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Clinical Trial Summary

Asthma imposes a significant burden in the US in terms of morbidity, costs to society, individual suffering, loss of productivity and mortality. African Americans (AA) and Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) bear a disproportionate share of that morbidity. Despite national guidelines for asthma treatment, the gap between these groups and whites has been stable or widening. The need for pragmatic research to address the continuing burden is widely recognized. Patients use asthma reliever inhalers to provide immediate relief of symptoms. Controller inhalers (inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)) are intended to be used regularly to prevent symptoms and attacks. Guidelines suggest that they be used daily, on a fixed basis, in all but the mildest asthma. However, adherence by patients and implementation of evidence-based guideline recommendations by clinicians has been poor. Gap analysis suggests that it is difficult to improve adherence to the current recommendations without complex and resource-intensive interventions. Studies have examined symptom-activated use of ICS triggered by use of a reliever medication. The Investigators call this approach PARTICS - Patient Activated Reliever-Triggered Inhaled CorticoSteroid. Explanatory, non-real world studies suggest that PARTICS can produce up to 50% reductions in asthma attacks compared with usual care, while reducing ICS use by half or more. These studies have been performed in pre-selected populations, which represent less than 5% of asthma patients. The previous studies have been done with repeated education and adherence checks in both the intervention and control arms. The investigators have consulted with AA and H/L patients, health care providers, leaders of professional societies, advocacy groups, health policy leaders, pharmacists, and pharmaceutical manufacturers. All groups have indicated that asthma decision making would be changed if we demonstrated that implementing PARTICS improves important asthma outcomes such as reducing exacerbations. The Investigators have designed a study with the stakeholders to determine whether PARTICS can improve outcomes that are important to patients when superimposed on a background provider-educated standard of care through the Asthma IQ system. The Investigators propose a study entitled PREPARE: Patient Empowered Strategy to Reduce Asthma Morbidity in Highly Impacted Populations. The Investigators aim to determine whether PARTICS can reduce asthma morbidity in AA and H/L.


Clinical Trial Description

Asthma imposes a significant burden on the US population in terms of morbidity, costs to society, individual suffering, loss of productivity and mortality. African Americans (AA) and Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) bear a disproportionate share of that morbidity. Despite introduction of national guidelines for asthma treatment, the gap between these groups and whites has been stable or widening. The need for pragmatic research to address the continuing burden is widely recognized. Patients use asthma reliever inhalers to provide immediate relief of symptoms. Controller inhalers (inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)) are intended to be used regularly to prevent symptoms and attacks. Guidelines suggest that they be used daily, on a fixed basis, in all but the mildest asthma. However, adherence by patients and implementation of evidence-based guideline recommendations by clinicians has been poor. Gap analysis suggests that it is difficult to improve adherence to the current recommendations without complex and resource-intensive interventions. Studies have examined symptom-activated use of ICS triggered by use of a reliever medication. We call this approach PARTICS - Patient Activated Reliever-Triggered Inhaled CorticoSteroid. Explanatory, non-real world studies suggest that PARTICS can produce up to 50% reductions in asthma attacks compared with usual care, while reducing ICS use by half or more. However, these studies have been performed in pre- selected populations, which represent less than 5% of patients with asthma. They have been done with repeated education and adherence checks in both the intervention and control arms. The investigators have consulted with AA and H/L patients, health care providers, leaders of professional societies, advocacy groups, health policy leaders, pharmacists, and pharmaceutical manufacturers. All groups have indicated that asthma decision making would be changed if it was demonstrated that implementing PARTICS improves important asthma outcomes such as reducing rates of exacerbations. Together with our partners and stakeholders, the investigators have designed a study to determine whether PARTICS can improve outcomes that are important to patients when superimposed on a background provider-educated standard care through the Asthma IQ system. The investigators therefore propose a study entitled PREPARE: Patient Empowered Strategy to Reduce Asthma Morbidity in Highly Impacted Populations. The aim is to determine whether a PARTICS strategy can reduce asthma morbidity in AA and H/L. The primary outcome will be asthma exacerbations which have been shown to be important to patient and healthcare stakeholders. The secondary outcomes will include additional outcomes important to patients (i.e. days lost from work or school, asthma control, & asthma quality of life). The investigators have broad input and involvement from multiple stakeholder groups in study design, implementation, and commitments for dissemination. AA and H/L patients and their advocates have been involved and will continue to play a central role in all phases of the study. ;


Study Design


Related Conditions & MeSH terms


NCT number NCT02995733
Study type Interventional
Source Brigham and Women's Hospital
Contact
Status Active, not recruiting
Phase Phase 4
Start date November 27, 2017
Completion date May 2021

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