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Seasonal Affective Disorder clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03691792 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Optimizing Long-Term Outcomes for Winter Depression With CBT-SAD and Light Therapy

Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Major depression is a highly prevalent, chronic, and debilitating mental health problem with significant social cost that poses a tremendous economic burden. Winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a subtype of recurrent major depression that affects 5% of the population (14.5 million Americans), involving substantial depressive symptoms for about 5 months of each year during most years, beginning in young adulthood.

NCT ID: NCT03403959 Recruiting - Visual Impairment Clinical Trials

Seasonal Affective Disorder and Visual Impairment

Start date: December 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

As a subtype of major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder (SAD) or winter depression causes severe reductions in both quality of life and productivity and results in high morbidity and frequent sick leave (1). SAD is a prevalent disorder with rates as high as 3-5% in central European countries and 8-10% in Scandinavian countries. In our recent screening survey among persons with severe visual impairment or blindness (visual acuity < 6/60), we found a strikingly high prevalence of SAD of 17 % compared to 8% in the fully sighted control group. Persons with maintained light perception had a highly increased SAD prevalence of 18 % whereas no light perception (NLP) respondents had an SAD prevalence of 13 %. Light is unquestionably of great importance in the development and treatment of SAD. It is suggested that a reduced retinal sensitivity to light leads to sub-threshold light input to the brain and consequently to the development of SAD. The novel retinal non-visual photoreceptors, the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), are involved in the regulation of circadian rhythm and mood and their function are in part independent of the function of the classical rod and cone photoreceptors which form the basis of conscious visual perception. Function of the ipRGCs can be assessed by chromatic pupillometry where the sustained pupillary contractions following blue light stimulation (PIPR) is the main outcome. In persons with SAD without eye disorder the function of the ipRGCs is reduced. We here wish to investigate associations between ipRGC function and SAD symptoms, circadian profile and treatment response to light therapy in persons with visual impairment. Persons with visual impairment (SAD and non-SAD) are assessed for ipRGC function with chromatic pupillometry, for seasonal mood variation by interview and questionnaire and for diurnal melatonin secretion by saliva analysis summer and winter. In winter SAD participants are treated with daily morning bright light for 6 weeks. Reduction in depression scores and tolerability is recorded.

NCT ID: NCT03313674 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Major Depressive Disorder

Investigation of Seasonal Variations of Brain Structure and Connectivity in SAD

Start date: November 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a subtype of Major Depressive Disorder, characterized by a recurrent temporal relationship between the season of year, the onset and the remission of a major depressive episode. Estimates of the annual prevalence state that 1-6% of the population will develop SAD with the larger prevalences found at greater extremes in latitude. SAD is most likely triggered by the shortening photoperiod experienced in the winter months leading to a deterioration of mood. Recent cross-sectional neuroimaging studies have found cellular and neurotransmitter changes in response to seasonality, ultimately having an impact on the affect of patients. Conversly, this study aims to investigate the changes in neurocircuitry related to depression and euthymic states. Patients with SAD offer a unique ability to study these changes since they have predictable triggers for the onset of depression (i.e. the winter months) and remission (i.e. the summer months).

NCT ID: NCT02582398 Completed - Clinical trials for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Influence of Light Exposure on Cerebral MAO-A in Seasonal Affective Disorder and Healthy Controls Measured by PET

Start date: November 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study aims to assess differences in monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) distribution in the brain between seasonal affective disorder patients and healthy controls using positron emission tomography. In addition the investigators aim to demonstrate the impact of light therapy on MAO-A distribution In addition, a pilot study and a sub-study in healthy controls were performed

NCT ID: NCT01784705 Completed - Clinical trials for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Transcranial Bright Light Therapy in Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

SAD3
Start date: January 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Bright light therapy (BLT) has been found to be effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The mechanism of action of conventional BLT in the treatment of SAD is under debate. Recently, transcranial bright light (TBL) via ear canals has been proved to modulate the neural networks of the human brain and improve cognitive performance in healthy subjects. Moreover, TBL has been found to alleviate symptoms of SAD in open trial. In this case the investigators will study the effect of transcranial bright light treatment via ear canals on depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients suffering from SAD in randomized controlled double-blind study design.

NCT ID: NCT01714050 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Cognitive-behavioral Therapy vs. Light Therapy for Preventing SAD Recurrence

Start date: July 2008
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Major depression is a highly prevalent, chronic, and debilitating mental health problem with significant social cost that poses a tremendous economic burden. Winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a subtype of recurrent major depression involving substantial depressive symptoms that adversely affect the family and workplace for about 5 months of each year during most years, beginning in young adulthood. This clinical trial is relevant to this public health challenge in seeking to develop and test a time-limited (i.e., acute treatment completed in a discrete period vs. daily treatment every fall/winter indefinitely), palatable cognitive-behavioral treatment with effects that endure beyond the cessation of acute treatment to prevent the annual recurrence of depression in SAD. Aim (1) To compare the long-term efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and light therapy on depression recurrence status, symptom severity, and remission status during the next winter season (i.e., the next wholly new winter season after the initial winter of treatment completion), which we argue to be the most important time point for evaluating clinical outcomes following SAD intervention. Hypothesis: CBT will be associated with a smaller proportion of depression recurrences, less severe symptoms, and a higher proportion of remissions than light therapy in the next winter. The study is designed to detect a clinically important difference between CBT and light therapy in depressive episode recurrences during the next winter, the primary endpoint, in an intent-to-treat analysis. Aim (2) To compare the efficacy of CBT and light therapy on symptom severity and remission status at post-treatment (treatment endpoint). Hypothesis: CBT and light therapy will not differ significantly on post-treatment outcomes.

NCT ID: NCT01462305 Terminated - Clinical trials for Seasonal Affective Disorder

30-Minute Light Exposure for the Treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder

SAD
Start date: December 2011
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of light therapy using a narrow 467nm light compared to a 580nm light in subjects with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). It is hypothesized that the 467nm light will improve the symptoms of SAD better than the 580nm light.

NCT ID: NCT01462058 Completed - Mental Health Clinical Trials

The Role of Vitamin D Supplementation on Well Being and Symptoms of Depression During the Winter Season in Health Service Staff

D3-vit-SAD
Start date: October 2011
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether vitamin D3 (70 micrograms) is better than placebo in preventing depression symptoms among employees in health care

NCT ID: NCT01293409 Completed - Clinical trials for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Bright Light Therapy in Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Start date: November 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Bright light therapy (BLT) is widely accepted as first-line treatment of seasonal affective disorder (SAD). However, the mechanism of action of BLT is still widely unknown. On the other hand, in mammals, light penetrates the skull bone and reaches the brain, and extra ocular transcranial phototransduction has physiological influences such as changed reproductive cycles and increased brain serotonin levels. Therefore, the investigators run a randomized, placebo controlled, double blind, dose finding study on the putative effect of transcranial bright light in the treatment of SAD.

NCT ID: NCT01292889 Completed - Clinical trials for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Study of Genes in Relation to Seasonal Affective Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder

Season605
Start date: October 2008
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The investigators are looking for volunteers who have a history of Major Depressive Disorder, the Winter Blues, or Seasonal Affective Disorder or healthy volunteers who do not have a history of these disorders for a research study on genetics.