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Pneumonia clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03530319 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Pneumonia, Mycoplasma

Treatment of Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma Pneumoniae

Start date: June 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A randomized clinical trial comparing treatment effectiveness of azithromycin and doxycycline for pediatric Mycoplasma pneumonia.

NCT ID: NCT03528759 Not yet recruiting - Pneumonia Clinical Trials

Streptoccus Pseudopneumoniae atAssiut UniversityHospitals

Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae as suggested by DNA-DNA homology studies is recorded as a species of the Streptococcus mitis/oralis members of viridans group Streptococci; they have some similar features to the Streptococcus mitis/oralis members of viridans Streptococcus pneumoniae

NCT ID: NCT03527992 Recruiting - Pneumonia Clinical Trials

Automated Oxygen Administration in Patients With Hypoxemic Pneumonia and Pleuropneumonia

OPPAÎ
Start date: March 9, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Hypoxemic pneumonia is a major cause of hospitalization in Pulmonology. The patient's dependency on oxygen prevents early discharge from the hospital. An automated oxygen therapy is a system that allows administration of oxygen with a flow that is automatically adjusted to the patient's saturation, which is continuously monitored. This system has proven to be particularly effective with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, by decreasing the time spent in hypoxia and hyperoxia, and by accelerating the weaning of oxygen. Our hypothesis is that automated oxygen therapy leads to a diminution on the length of hospital stay.

NCT ID: NCT03523182 Completed - Malaria Clinical Trials

Spirulina Supplementation and Infant Growth, Morbidity and Motor Development

Start date: March 1, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Background: In developing countries, micronutrient deficiency in infants is associated with growth faltering, morbidity, and delayed motor development. One of the potentially low-cost and sustainable solutions is to use locally producible food for the home fortification of complementary foods. Objective: The objectives are to test the hypothesis that locally producible spirulina platensis supplementation would achieve the following: 1) increase infant physical growth; 2) reduce morbidity; and 3) improve motor development. Design: 501 Zambian infants are randomly assigned into a control (CON) group or a spirulina (SP) group. Children in the CON group (n=250) receive a soya-maize-based porridge for 12 months, whereas those in the SP group (n=251) receive the same food but with the addition of spirulina. The change in infants' anthropometric status, morbidity, and motor development over 12 months are assessed.

NCT ID: NCT03515031 Not yet recruiting - Pneumonia Clinical Trials

High Flow Nasal Cannulae vs Venturi Mask in Respiratory Failure Due to Pneumonia

HiFlOViP
Start date: June 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of treatment with HFNC (group A) compared to administration of oxygen therapy by Venturi mask (group B, standard therapy) in terms of reaching of endotracheal intubation criteria during acute respiratory failure due to severe pneumonia. Inclusion Criteria: Respiratory rate (RR) at rest ≥30 bpm or presence of respiratory distress (severe dyspnoea at rest or use of accessory respiratory muscles or abdominal paradox); PaO2 / FiO2 ≤250 during oxygenation with Venturi Oxygenation mask at FiO2 = 50% administered for at least 60 minutes; Diagnosis of pneumonia as the sole cause of acute respiratory failure. Randomization: 150 consecutive patients will be randomized either to High Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygenation (75 patients, HFNCO with flow ≥ 60 L/min and FiO2 to maintain SpO2 ≥ ) or Venturi Mask Oxygenation (control, 75 patients). Patients from both groups will be treated with antibiotic therapy according to the IDSA/ATS 2007 guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia and the IDSA/ATS 2016 guidelines for hospital-acquired pneumonia. Intubation Criteria: MAJOR CRITERIA: Cardiac or respiratory arrest Breathing pauses with loss of consciousness Severe hemodynamic instability Need for sedation MINOR CRITERIA (maintained for ≥1h): Reduction ≥30% of the value of the PaO2/FiO 2 compared to baseline Increased 20% if PaCO2 PaCO2 previous ≥40mmHg Worsening alertness as increased by one degree on the Kelly scale Persistence or onset of respiratory distress Vital parameters, Kelly scale and arterial blood gas analysis (BGA) will be performed on admission, and at 1, 24, at 48 hours, at the achievement of clinical stability, and whenever there is a clinical worsening. Patients enrolled in HFNC arm will continue HFNC oxygenation until clinical stability, defined as: Body temperature ≤ 37°C and ≥36°C for 24 consecutive hours Good ability in swallowing CRP and WBC normalization trend than the admission exams Hemodynamic stability Lack of respiratory distress SpO2 94-98% The primary outcome variable is the proportion of patients who reach the endotracheal intubation criteria - regardless of the actual intubation rate - within the first 48 hours of treatment. The primary analysis will be performed on the ITT population

NCT ID: NCT03506191 Recruiting - Critical Illness Clinical Trials

Pneumonia Due to Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia in ICUs

RETROSTENO
Start date: January 1, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Pneumonia is a major cause of ICU admission, or may complicate ICU course. Among the causative pathogens, Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia is a rare pathogen, but affects usually patients with chronic pulmonary co-morbidities, or with long duration of mechanical ventilation and multiples treatment with broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy. However, there are only a paucity of data regarding epidemiology, impact and outcome of Pneumonia due to Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia in critically ill patients. Primary objective was to study factors associated with mortality in case of Pneumonia due to Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia. Secondary objectives were to describe factors associated with morbidity of Pneumonia due to Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia (duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU length of stay), and to report the characteristics of critically ill patients presenting Pneumonia due to Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia.

NCT ID: NCT03506113 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

GRam Stain-guided Antibiotics ChoicE for Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (GRACE-VAP) Trial

Start date: April 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Background: Optimising the use of antibiotic agents is a pressing challenge to overcoming the rapid emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens in intensive care units (ICUs). Although Gram staining may possibly provide immediate information for predicting pathogenic bacteria, Gram stain-guided initial antibiotic treatment is not well established in the ICU setting. The investigators planned the GRam stain-guided Antibiotics ChoicE for Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (GRACE-VAP) trial to investigate whether Gram staining can safely restrict the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), which is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in ICUs. Methods/Design: The GRACE-VAP trial is a multicenter, randomised, open-label parallel-group trial to assess the non-inferiority of Gram stain-guided initial antibiotic treatment to guidelines-based initial antibiotic treatment for the primary endpoint of clinical cure rate in patients with VAP. Secondary endpoints include the coverage rates of initial antibiotic therapies, the selected rates of anti-pseudomonal agents and anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) agents as initial antibiotic therapies, 28-day all-cause mortality, ICU-free days, ventilator-free days, and adverse events. Participants are randomly assigned to receive Gram stain-guided treatment or guidelines-based treatment at a ratio of 1:1. In the Gram stain group, results of Gram staining of endotracheal aspirate are used to guide the selection of antibiotics. In the guidelines group, the combination of an anti-pseudomonal agent and anti-MRSA agent are administered. A total sample size of 200 was estimated to provide a power of 80% with a 1-sided alpha level of 2.5% and a non-inferiority margin of 20%, considering 10% non-evaluable participants. Discussion: The GRACE-VAP trial is expected reveal whether Gram staining can reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics without impairing patient outcomes and thereby provide evidence for an antibiotics selection strategy in patients with VAP.

NCT ID: NCT03505281 Not yet recruiting - Pneumonia Clinical Trials

Evaluation of a Functional Lymphocyte Test (QuantiFERON Monitor®) as a Prognostic Marker for Acute Community-acquired Pneumonia

LYMPHONIE
Start date: May 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Lower respiratory infections, or pneumonia, remain the third leading cause of death worldwide, despite progress in vaccinating at-risk populations and improved resuscitation techniques. Research shows that immune defences are weakened during severe infections. This immune weakening could alter resistance to bacterial infection and facilitate death, but also facilitate the onset of secondary infections. Through this study, investigators wish to evaluate a biomedical test (derived from a blood sample - Quantiferon Monitor test), aimed at measuring the immune response of certain immune cells (lymphocytes). The objective of the study is to determine whether this test can predict the occurrence of death during pneumonia. If this hypothesis is verified, it would make it possible to use this test as a marker to identify patients at risk of death, and would open up new therapeutic prospects in order to provide patients with severe pneumonia with a treatment that stimulates their immune defences.

NCT ID: NCT03502291 Completed - Pneumonia Clinical Trials

The Effect of Live Attenuated Inactivated Influenza Vaccine on Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage Study

LAIV/EHPC
Start date: August 2015
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The investigators are interested in examining the effect of the Live Attenuated Influenza (flu) Vaccine (LAIV) upon nasal carriage of bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae (also known as pneumococcus). The nasal spray is a live attenuated vaccine which means that it has weakened virus that does not cause disease. This vaccine is licenced in the United Kingdom for children and adolescents from 2 to 18 years of age. Pneumococcus can commonly be found harmlessly inhabiting the nose where it does not cause any problem (pneumococcal colonisation). About 10% of adults carry pneumococcus at any one time, and almost all adults experience an episode of carriage at least once per year. Carriage acts as a natural vaccine, boosting immunity against pneumococcal infection in adults and children. During influenza there is an increase in the burden of pneumococcal pneumonia. We have studied the effects of pneumococcus for many years and have developed a programme in which we can nasally inoculate healthy participants with a dose of pneumococcus and achieve a reproducible carriage rate. The investigators would now like to use this model to investigate the effects of the nasal influenza vaccine upon pneumococcal carriage and to better understand how influenza infections lead to increased susceptibility to pneumonia. Pneumococcal disease in young adults is rare - less than 10 cases per 100,000 people per year. When pneumococcus does cause problems, usually in young children or elderly people, it can be very serious as it is responsible for diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, which kill millions of children around the world each year.

NCT ID: NCT03497962 Completed - Pneumonia Clinical Trials

P4 Peptide in Community Acquired Pneumonia

P4
Start date: January 2013
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The investigators' aim is to find out whether immune cells from patients with a severe chest infection will react ex vivo to a new immunomodulating peptide, P4 as part of augmented passive immunotherapy The investigators know that P4 treatment can successfully improve the efficiency of specialized immune cells responsible for killing bacteria. The investigators also know that P4 treatment is effective in healthy human volunteers but wish to extend this observation to patients that have infection, as immune cells may react differently in these patients. If this study is successful, the investigators hope to be moving closer to a new treatment against severe bacterial infections. The investigators plan to recruit patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and healthy volunteers, using carefully established inclusion and exclusions criteria with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and obtain both blood and (if clinically feasible), a bronchoscopy BAL sample (washing of lung tissue).