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NCT ID: NCT03559101 Completed - Dehydration Clinical Trials

Effects of Amino Acid/Electrolyte-based Beverages on Hydration Status

Start date: May 25, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Older adults typically do not drink later in the day to avoid the necessity of interrupting sleep to urinate. Sometimes they also limit ingestion of fluids to avoid the need to urinate when engaged in certain activities such as traveling or attending an event. Therefore, beverages that have greater fluid retention in the body leading to a more sustained positive hydration status could be advantageous in such situations. The composition of a beverage as well as other factors such as volume ingested and metabolism of components can affect the retention of the fluid in the body. Age may be another factor. The beverage hydration index (BHI), first described in 2016, was used to indicate the hydration response to thirteen well-known beverages in young male adults. The current study assesses the BHI of four beverages and how that response is affected by age following the standardized protocol. The four beverages have been chosen for inclusion in this study because they have been used by older adults to prevent dehydration.

NCT ID: NCT03559088 Not yet recruiting - Migraine Clinical Trials

A Study of the Effect of a Disease-Specific Migraine Smart Phone Application (App) on Participant Care

Start date: June 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine whether using a smart phone application to foster communication between study participants and their doctor will impact care. Participants must have a history of migraine or have recently been prescribed a common medicine to treat migraine. The study will last about one year for each participant.

NCT ID: NCT03559075 Not yet recruiting - Atopic Dermatitis Clinical Trials

Clinical vs. Anecdotal Evidence - Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis

Start date: June 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

In dermatology, topical anti-inflammatory medications, such as corticosteroids, are the mainstay treatment of managing patients with atopic dermatitis. However, caregivers are often apprehensive about choosing a topical steroid for a variety of reasons. Many caregivers are not aware that clinical trial evidence for these medications exist, and instead may rely on anecdotal evidence in choosing to take these medications. Because fear of the drug is inherently subjective, it can be modified with appropriate reassurance and presentation of evidence. The goal of the study is to learn whether caregivers are more confident in treating a child's atopic dermatitis after being presented with varying amounts of information.

NCT ID: NCT03559049 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

Rucaparib and Pembrolizumab for Maintenance Therapy in Stage IV Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Start date: July 2018
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This study is a multi-center, Phase I/II, single arm trial to assess the safety and efficacy of the combination of oral rucaparib plus intravenous pembrolizumab as maintenance therapy in patients with stage IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without progressive disease (PD), as confirmed on CT scans, after induction therapy with carboplatin/pemetrexed/pembrolizumab (CPP) triplet therapy.

NCT ID: NCT03559036 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Spinal Cord Injuries

Pediatric Locomotor Training Bladder Study

Start date: April 26, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Bladder dysfunction is one of the most important factors influencing duration and quality of life in children with spinal cord injury. Effective bladder control comprises a major aspect of a child's life with SCI and is especially challenging due to the rapid changes in a child's physical and cognitive development. Urological consequences secondary to a neurogenic bladder are responsible for many clinical complications post-spinal cord injury, including repeated urinary tract infections, autonomic dysreflexia, lifelong urologic care, and many hospitalizations. Alternative approaches to bladder management that focus on recovery of function and age-appropriate independence are needed. Prior research findings in our lab in adult participants indicate a benefit of locomotor training on bladder function. The purpose of this study is to determine with quantitative unbiased urodynamic outcome measures if locomotor training, provided to children with spinal cord injury, impacts the developing urinary system.

NCT ID: NCT03559010 Recruiting - Contraception Clinical Trials

A Study of Oral Contraception Under Simulated OTC Conditions

OPTION
Start date: April 27, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This study is designed to assess whether consumers select and use norgestrel 0.075 mg, a progestin only pill for contraception, in a manner consistent with the OTC package directions in an Over-the-Counter (OTC)-like setting.

NCT ID: NCT03558997 Recruiting - Allergic Rhinitis Clinical Trials

Dupilumab As An Adjunct For Subcutaneous Grass Immunotherapy

Start date: June 14, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective is to assess whether 16 weeks of treatment with dupilumab as an adjunct to Timothy Grass Subcutaneous Immunotherapy (SCIT) improves upon the efficacy of Timothy Grass SCIT to reduce provoked allergic rhinitis symptoms, as measured by Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS) after nasal allergen challenge (NAC) with Timothy Grass extract at week 17. The secondary objectives of the study are: - To assess whether 16 weeks of treatment with dupilumab as compared to placebo reduces provoked allergic rhinitis symptoms, as measured by TNSS after nasal allergen challenge (NAC) with Timothy Grass extract - To assess changes in serum Timothy-grass-specific immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4), serum Timothy grass-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE), and ratio of serum Timothy Grass-specific IgG4 to IgE over 16 weeks of treatment with dupilumab + SCIT as compared to SCIT monotherapy - To evaluate the safety and tolerability of 16 weeks of treatment with dupilumab as an adjunct to Timothy Grass SCIT

NCT ID: NCT03558971 Completed - Rheumatic Diseases Clinical Trials

Patient Self-administration of Cortisol for Cortisol-responding Disorders in Men and Women Over the Age of 17

Start date: January 1, 2000
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Participants diagnosed as having fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis are to be brought to a minimum symptom state using a 3-week period during which they are to ingest modest doses of cortisol tablets with weekly lowered tapered doses. Thereafter, the participants are to be taught to self-administer cortisol tablets on the as-needed basis to maintain the minimum symptom state. For this, they are to ingest a smaller-dosage, 5-day tapered regimen of cortisol tablets to quench each reoccurring exacerbation of the disease at its earliest stage. Participants are limited to using less than the safe use limit of cortisol per month and are required to include a minimum of 10 days per month during which no cortisol was ingested.

NCT ID: NCT03558958 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Exploratory, Open-label Study to Assess Safety and Efficacy of P-188 NF in DMD Patients

Start date: June 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This is an open-label study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of daily, subcutaneous dosing with P-188 NF (Carmeseal-MD™) in non-ambulatory boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). This study will determine if continuous treatment with Carmeseal-MD™ can maintain or improve pulmonary function, and skeletal and cardiac muscle function, compared to baseline, in boys 12-25 years of age.

NCT ID: NCT03558893 Not yet recruiting - Hypertension Clinical Trials

Health Disparities in Hypertension

Start date: July 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study will be the first to distinguish the relative contributions of sleep, circadian and behavioral mechanisms to the non-dipping BP profile in Black adults and will lay the groundwork for optimizing therapies dependent on mechanisms, such as targeting sleep, targeting circadian rhythmicity, or targeting behaviors, and raising the possibility that ideal therapy for hypertension (HTN) may differ by race. This research will ultimately help to improve health and survival in black populations with HTN.