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Colorectal Cancer clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Colorectal Cancer.

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NCT ID: NCT03843749 Recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Pyrotinib in Combination With Trastuzumab in Treatment-refractory, HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancar.

Start date: July 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This clinical trial aims to evaluate the efficacy, safety of Pyrotinib in combination with trastuzumab in Treatment-refractory, HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancar.

NCT ID: NCT03843398 Not yet recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Survival Outcome After Minilaparotomy for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

SoMiniCRC
Start date: April 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The primary aim of this study is - to determine the difference of survival outcome (3-year overall survival, 3y OS) between after minilaparotomy and after laparoscopy.. Other aims include to determine the data below when minilaparotomy and laparoscopy are compared with each other. - 3-year disease free survival, 3y DFS - 5-year overall survival, 5y OS - 5-year disease free survival, 5y DFS - Local recurrence rate, LRR - Postoperative complications Incidence and mortality at 30 days

NCT ID: NCT03841799 Not yet recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

COLON-IM : Prospective Cohort Study About Colorectal Environment:Microbiota and Immune Infiltrate in Colorectal Tissue

Start date: March 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The primary objective of COLON-IM is to describe colorectal tissue microenvironment (neutrophils infiltrate) of patients with benign or malignant colorectal lesion (from stage I to III according to Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM)/ Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) classification).

NCT ID: NCT03841110 Not yet recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

FT500 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

Start date: March 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

FT500 is an off-the-shelf, iPSC-derived NK cell product that can bridge innate and adaptive immunity, and has the potential to overcome multiple mechanisms of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) resistance. The preclinical data provide compelling evidence supporting the clinical investigation of FT500 as monotherapy and in combination with ICI in subjects with advanced solid tumors.

NCT ID: NCT03836131 Recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Rate of Cancer of Granular Mixed Laterally Spreading Tumors (GM-LST)

LST GM
Start date: December 31, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide, with 1.65 million new cases and almost 835,000 deaths in 2015. CRC is still a major cause of mortality associated with cancer, although the wide spread of the screening program has led to a reduction in the mortality rate compared to the last decades. CRCs derive from precancerous lesions that may be polypoid or non-polypoid according to the Paris classification. Thus, resection in an early stage could led to a CRC mortality reduction. Laterally spreading tumors (LST) are non-polypoid lesions of at least 1 cm in diameter that have lateral growth rather than upward or downward growth. The prevalence of LSTs ranges from 1 to 6% of all colorectal lesions. LSTs can be divided into two groups: granular LSTs, which include homogeneous and granular mixed forms and non-granular (NG) LSTs, which include pseudo-depressed and flat-elevated forms. Histologically, 90% of LSTs are adenomas and having a low incidence of invasive neoplasia, these lesions can be removed endoscopically. However, as evidenced by a recent meta-analysis published by Bogie Roel MM et al on Endoscopy, the type of LST and the distal or proximal colonic localization could represent predictors of submucosal invasion and could simplify the therapeutic decision for the removal of these lesions. GM-LSTs and pseudo-depressed NG-LSTs predominantly localize in the distal portion of the colon and have a submucosal invasion rate of 10,5% and 31,6% respectively. LSTs can be removed both through endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The main limitation of EMR is that large lesions require a piecemeal approach, resulting in a non-optimal histological evaluation and a high risk of recurrence. ESD instead allows a higher rate of en bloc resections, thus resulting more curative and reducing the risk of having partial and incomplete resections, which can lead to disease recurrence/non curative resection. LST-GM are characterized by the presence of a granular appearance with a main nodule and represent approximately 1/4 of the LSTs. There are no guidelines indicating the proper resective technique of these lesions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) suggests to consider ESD for the removal of colorectal lesions that are > 20 mm in size, with a depressed and irregular morphology or a non-granular surface pattern, as these lesions have a high probability of having a limited submucosal invasion. Moreover ESD can be used to treat lesions that cannot be completely removed with standard polypectomy or EMR. The investigators propose to perform a multicenter retrospective observational study to define the percentage of cancer in patients with GM-LSTs treated with endoscopic resection in order to evaluate the correlation between pre-resection and post-resection characteristics, defining the best therapeutic approach (en bloc or piecemeal) and avoiding incomplete endoscopic resections or unnecessary surgical procedures.

NCT ID: NCT03831698 Not yet recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Omega 3 Fatty Acids in Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Prevention in Patients With Lynch Syndrome (COLYNE)

Start date: February 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This is a pilot study aimed at assessing the effects of moderate dose omega-3-acid ethyl esters capsules (generic Lovaza) on molecular, and intestinal microbiota changes in participants at high risk for colorectal cancer. The study will be a single arm, open label study.

NCT ID: NCT03829436 Not yet recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

TPST-1120 as Monotherapy and in Combination With (Nivolumab, Docetaxel or Cetuximab) in Subjects With Advanced Cancers

Start date: March 11, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This is a phase 1/1b open label, multicenter dose escalation and dose expansion study to investigate the safety, tolerability and anti-tumor activity of TPST-1120, a small molecule selective antagonist of PPARĪ± (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha) as monotherapy and in combination with other systemic anticancer agents including nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody, docetaxel, a cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent and cetuximab, an anti-EGFR antibody in subjects with advanced solid tumors.

NCT ID: NCT03828396 Recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer and Advanced Adenoma Using Cancer-specific Methylation Signatures

Start date: October 26, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Colorectal cancer is a common malignant tumor of the digestive tract. It is still a challenging task to detect colorectal cancer at an early stage. Studies have found that DNA methylation has a relationship with the occurrence and development of tumors. Singlera Genomics Inc. has invented the proprietary methyl-Titan sequencing technology and developed a detection method for colorectal cancer and advanced adenoma (Adenoma/Colorectal cancer Early detection, ACE) using the cancer-specific methylation markers. ACE is a blood-based non-invasive diagnostic technique. It has high compliance rate compared with colonoscopy, and sampling is more convenient than stool testing. It also has much higher sensitivity compared to existing blood testing methods. The current study plans to use ACE method to analyze ctDNA in the blood for the cancer-specific DNA methylation markers to aid in the differential diagnosis of patients with colorectal cancer or adenoma. This technique will greatly reduce the discomfort in the diagnosis of suspected patients and improve the diagnosis of high-risk population of colorectal cancer. The goals of this study are: 1) to establish a detection system based on plasma ctDNA methylation sequencing technology for the auxiliary diagnosis of colorectal cancer and adenoma, 2) to assess the diagnostic value of plasma ctDNA methylation signature for colorectal cancer and adenoma, and 3) to assess the association of plasma ctDNA methylation signals with colonoscopy results and pathological results of surgical specimens. A total of 1300 patients (700 cases positive and 600 cases negative) aging between 45 and 80 years old will be enrolled. Colonoscopy will be performed to determine whether patients are positive or negative. Positive patients who need surgical resection will be further classified according to their surgical histopathological results. For negative patients, the type of lesion will be clarified. The plasma samples of all subjects will be analyzed for cancer-specific ctDNA methylation profiles. Based on the results of plasma ctDNA methylation test, the risks of colorectal cancer of the enrolled subjects are scored. Combined with the grouping information, the clinical application value of the cancer-specific methylation profile for early cancer diagnosis will be assessed.

NCT ID: NCT03827967 Not yet recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Trial of PalloV-CC in Colon Cancer

Start date: February 15, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study is a phase Ib prospective, open label study evaluating the effect of vaccination on the immune microenvironment of cancers with results compared to banked tissue from historical controls. Prospectively vaccinated patients will also serve as their own controls by comparing the immune microenvironment of the tumor in pre-treatment biopsies to post-treatment surgical specimens. This is also a dose-escalation study with consecutive enrollment and advancement of cohorts in an overlapping fashion.

NCT ID: NCT03821948 Recruiting - Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Blood and Stool Sample Collection in Subjects Participating in Colorectal Cancer Screening: Act Bold

Start date: January 3, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The primary objective of this study is to collect de-identified, clinically-characterized stool and whole blood specimens for use in developing and evaluating the performance of new biomarker assays for detection of colorectal cancer (CRC).