Clinical Trials Logo

Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia.

Filter by:

NCT ID: NCT04797767 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Venetoclax and CLAG-M for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

Start date: May 1, 2021
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial finds the best dose and side effects of venetoclax in combination with cladribine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and mitoxantrone (CLAG-M) in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia and high-grade myeloid neoplasms. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax with CLAG-M may kill more cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT04128501 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Venetoclax and Azacitidine for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Post-Transplant Setting

Start date: May 5, 2020
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax and azacitidine work for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia after stem cell transplantation. Venetoclax, a BCL-2 inhibitor, and azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving venetoclax and azacitidine after a stem cell transplant may help control high risk leukemia and prevent it from coming back after the transplant.

NCT ID: NCT03970096 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Graft Versus Host Disease-Reduction Strategies for Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant Patients With Acute Leukemia

Start date: November 19, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial investigates four strategies and how well they work for the reduction of graft versus host disease in patients with acute leukemia in remission. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT03779854 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Naive T Cell Depletion for Preventing Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease in Children and Young Adults With Blood Cancers Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: August 29, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well naive T-cell depletion works in preventing chronic graft-versus-host disease in children and young adults with blood cancers undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted white blood cells from a donor attack the body's normal tissues (called graft versus host disease). Removing a particular type of T cell (naive T cells) from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.

NCT ID: NCT03739606 Withdrawn - Acute Leukemia Clinical Trials

Flotetuzumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory CD123 Positive Blood Cancer

Start date: October 20, 2020
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well flotetuzumab works in treating patients with CD123 positive blood cancer that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as flotetuzumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

NCT ID: NCT03683433 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Enasidenib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and IDH2 Gene Mutation

Start date: September 18, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well enasidenib and azacitidine work in treating patients with IDH2 gene mutation and acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Enasidenib and azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT03399773 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Infusion of Expanded Cord Blood Cells in Addition to Single Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Start date: June 1, 2021
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well donor umbilical cord blood transplant with ex-vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells (NLA101) works in treating patients with blood cancer. Before the transplant, patients will receive chemotherapy (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and in some cases thiotepa) and radiation therapy. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT03326921 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

HA-1 T TCR T Cell Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: February 23, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CD4+ and CD8+ HA-1 T cell receptor (TCR) T cells in treating patients with acute leukemia that persists, has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) following donor stem cell transplant. T cell receptor is a special protein on T cells that helps them recognize proteins on other cells including leukemia. HA-1 is a protein that is present on the surface of some peoples' blood cells, including leukemia. HA-1 T cell immunotherapy enables genes to be added to the donor cells to make them recognize HA-1 markers on leukemia cells.

NCT ID: NCT03267186 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Ibrutinib in Preventing Acute Leukemia in Patients After Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: September 12, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib works in preventing acute leukemia in patients after reduced-intensity conditioning and stem cell transplant. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT03195010 Terminated - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Management of Platelet Transfusion Therapy in Patients With Blood Cancer or Treatment-Induced Thrombocytopenia

Start date: June 9, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial compares the safety of two different platelet transfusion "thresholds" among patients with blood cancer or treatment-induced thrombocytopenia whose condition requires anticoagulant medication (blood thinners) for blood clots. Giving relatively fewer platelet transfusions may reduce the side effects of frequent platelet transfusions without leading to undue bleeding.