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Acid Maltase Deficiency Disease clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT00520143 Approved for marketing - Clinical trials for Pompe Disease (Late-Onset)

Alglucosidase Alfa Temporary Access Program

ATAP
Start date: n/a
Phase: N/A
Study type: Expanded Access

Pompe disease (also known as glycogen storage disease Type II) is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In patients with Pompe disease, an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart and skeletal muscle, which prevents their normal function. The objective of this expanded access study is to provide patients with Pompe disease in the United States (US), access to alglucosidase alfa produced from a scaled up manufacturing process for a limited time until production at this scale is approved for commercial use by the Food and Drug Administration.

NCT ID: NCT00486889 Active, not recruiting - Pompe Disease Clinical Trials

Growth and Development Study of Alglucosidase Alfa.

Start date: August 26, 2008
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Pompe disease (also known as glycogen storage disease Type II) is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In patients with Pompe disease, an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart and skeletal muscle, which prevents their normal function. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the long-term growth and development of patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease with alglucosidase alfa before 1 year of age. Patients will be followed for 10-year period.

NCT ID: NCT00268944 Completed - Clinical trials for Pompe Disease (Late-onset)

Safety and Effectiveness Study of rhGAA in Patients With Advanced Late-Onset Pompe Disease Receiving Respiratory Support

Start date: December 2005
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Pompe disease (also known as glycogen storage disease Type II) is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In patients with Pompe disease, an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart and skeletal muscle, which prevents their normal function. The overall objective is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of rhGAA in patients with advanced Late-onset Pompe disease.

NCT ID: NCT00250939 Completed - Clinical trials for Pompe Disease (Late-onset)

A Study of rhGAA in Patients With Late-Onset Pompe Disease

Start date: February 2005
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Pompe disease (also known as glycogen storage disease Type II) is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In patients with Pompe disease, an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart and skeletal muscle, which prevents their normal function. The overall objective is to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and efficacy of Myozyme treatment.

NCT ID: NCT00158600 Completed - Clinical trials for Pompe Disease (Late-onset)

A Placebo-Controlled Study of Safety and Effectiveness of Myozyme (Alglucosidase Alfa) in Patients With Late-Onset Pompe Disease

Start date: September 2005
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Pompe disease (also known as glycogen storage disease Type II) is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In patients with Pompe disease, an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart and skeletal muscle, which prevents their normal function. The overall objective is to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of alglucosidase alfa treatment in patients with late-onset Pompe disease as compared to placebo.

NCT ID: NCT00053573 Completed - Pompe Disease Clinical Trials

rhGAA in Patients With Infantile-onset Glycogen Storage Disease-II (Pompe Disease)

Start date: February 2003
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Glycogen Storage Disease Type II ("GSD-II"; also known as Pompe disease) is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In patients with GSD-II, an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart and skeletal muscle, which prevents their normal function. This study is being conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for GSD-II. Patients diagnosed with infantile-onset GSD-II who are greater than 6 months old, but less than or equal to 36 months old will be studied.

NCT ID: NCT00051935 Completed - Pompe Disease Clinical Trials

A Study of the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of rhGAA in Siblings With Glycogen Storage Disease Type II

Start date: January 2003
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

GSD-II (also known as Pompe disease) is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In patients with GSD-II, an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart and skeletal muscle, which prevents their normal function. This study is being conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and efficacy of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for a pair of siblings with GSD-II. To be eligible for this study, a patient must have a confirmed diagnosis of GSD-II and have a sister or brother who also has a confirmed diagnosis of GSD-II.

NCT ID: NCT00025896 Completed - Pompe Disease Clinical Trials

Safety and Efficacy of Recombinant Human Acid Alpha-Glucosidase in the Treatment of Classical Infantile Pompe Disease

Start date: May 2001
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Pompe disease is caused by a deficiency of a critical enzyme in the body called acid alpha glucosidase (GAA). Normally, GAA is used by the body's cells to break down glycogen (a stored form of sugar) within specialized structures called lysosomes. In infants with severe cases of Pompe disease (called Classical Infantile Pompe disease), an excessive amount of glycogen accumulates and is stored in various tissues, especially heart, skeletal muscle, and liver, which prevents their normal function. This study being conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease. Patients diagnosed with Classical Infantile Pompe disease who have a small, but inactive, amount of natural GAA enzyme present in their bodies (called Cross-Reacting Immunologic Material-Positive or "CRIM (+)" patients), will be studied.