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Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

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NCT ID: NCT02831179 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

Start date: December 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of veliparib when given together with capecitabine and temozolomide in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumor that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment, has returned after a period of improvement, and cannot be removed by surgery. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

NCT ID: NCT02267603 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Merkel Cell Cancer

Start date: November 25, 2014
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with Merkel cell cancer that cannot be removed by surgery or controlled with treatment, or has spread to other parts of the body. Pembrolizumab may stimulate the immune system to identify and destroy cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT01758458 Terminated - Clinical trials for Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Viral Oncoprotein Targeted Autologous T Cell Therapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Start date: February 2013
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best way to give laboratory treated autologous T cells together with aldesleukin and to see how well it works in treating patients with merkel cell carcinoma that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body. Biological therapies, such as cellular adoptive immunotherapy, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill tumor cells. Giving cellular adoptive immunotherapy with aldesleukin may be a better treatment for metastatic merkel cell carcinoma.

NCT ID: NCT01204476 Completed - Paraganglioma Clinical Trials

Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

Start date: October 2010
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cixutumumab when given together with everolimus and octreotide acetate in treating patients with advanced low- or intermediate-grade neuroendocrine cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cixutumumab, may find tumor cells and help carry tumor-killing substances to them. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Octreotide acetate may interfere with the growth of tumor cells and slow the growth of neuroendocrine cancer. Giving cixutumumab together with everolimus and octreotide acetate may be a better treatment for neuroendocrine cancer.