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Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT02650635 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

Start date: February 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib trial studies the best way of TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with a solid tumor that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body (metastatic), progressed for a long time (persistent), come back (recurrent), or is growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressed). TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 together with cyclophosphamide may be a better treatment for solid tumors.

NCT ID: NCT02595866 Recruiting - HIV Infection Clinical Trials

Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With HIV and Relapsed, Refractory, or Disseminated Malignant Neoplasms

Start date: February 3, 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malignant neoplasms that have come back (relapsed), do not respond to treatment (refractory), or have distributed over a large area in the body (disseminated). Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor or cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It may also help the immune system kill cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT02581930 Recruiting - Metastatic Melanoma Clinical Trials

Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Refractory Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma

Start date: August 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib works in treating patients with stage IV melanoma of the skin that has not responded to previous treatment. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT02506153 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7

High-Dose Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2B, Ipilimumab, or Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV High Risk Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery

Start date: October 15, 2015
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase III trial studies how well high-dose recombinant interferon alfa-2B or ipilimumab works compared with pembrolizumab in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma that has been removed by surgery but is likely to come back or spread. High-dose recombinant interferon alfa-2B may help shrink or slow the growth of melanoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether high-dose recombinant interferon alfa-2B or ipilimumab is more effective than pembrolizumab in treating patients with melanoma.

NCT ID: NCT02339571 Suspended - Clinical trials for Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7

Nivolumab and Ipilimumab With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: September 10, 2015
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II/III trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with or without sargramostim and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may kill tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor, by stimulating white blood cells to kill the tumor cells, or by attacking specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the production of white blood cells. It is not yet known whether nivolumab and ipilimumab are more effective with or without sargramostim in treating patients with melanoma.