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Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT01825603 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

ADH-1, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic or Biliary Tract Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

Start date: April 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ADH-1 when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin in treating patients with metastatic pancreatic or biliary tract cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. ADH-1 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving ADH-1 together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT01229111 Completed - Clinical trials for Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer

Cediranib Maleate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary Cancers

Start date: October 2010
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial is studying how well giving cediranib maleate together with combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with advanced biliary cancers. Cediranib maleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth or by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving cediranib maleate together with combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT00478140 Completed - Malignant Neoplasm Clinical Trials

Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: May 2007
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial is studying how well trastuzumab works in treating patients with locally advanced or metastatic gallbladder cancer or bile duct cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them

NCT ID: NCT00397384 Completed - Clinical trials for Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

Start date: January 2007
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of erlotinib hydrochloride when given together with cetuximab and to see how well they work in treating patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer, head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, or colorectal cancer. Erlotinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Erlotinib hydrochloride and cetuximab may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Giving erlotinib hydrochloride together with cetuximab may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT00356889 Completed - Clinical trials for Gastrointestinal Cancer

Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Biliary Tumors

Start date: May 2006
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial is studying how well giving bevacizumab together with erlotinib hydrochloride works in treating patients with metastatic or unresectable biliary tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Erlotinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Bevacizumab and erlotinib hydrochloride may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Giving bevacizumab together with erlotinib hydrochloride may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT00253617 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

Stent Placement With or Without Photodynamic Therapy Using Porfimer Sodium as Palliative Treatment in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Cholangiocarcinoma That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

Start date: n/a
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

RATIONALE: Stent placement may help reduce symptoms caused by the tumor. Photodynamic therapy uses a drug, such as porfimer sodium, that becomes active when it is exposed to a certain kind of light. When the drug is active, tumor cells are killed. This may be an effective treatment for cholangiocarcinoma. It is not yet known whether stent placement and photodynamic therapy using porfimer sodium are more effective than stent placement alone in treating cholangiocarcinoma. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying stent placement and photodynamic therapy using porfimer sodium to see how well they work compared to stent placement alone as palliative treatment in treating patients with stage III or stage IV cholangiocarcinoma that cannot be removed by surgery.

NCT ID: NCT00238212 Completed - Clinical trials for Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

S0514 Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

Start date: October 2005
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial is studying how well sorafenib works in treating patients with unresectable or metastatic gallbladder cancer or cholangiocarcinoma. Sorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking blood flow to the tumor

NCT ID: NCT00107536 Completed - Clinical trials for Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer

Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver or Biliary Tract Cancer

Start date: October 2005
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This phase II trial is studying how well lapatinib ditosylate works in treating patients with unresectable liver or biliary tract cancer

NCT ID: NCT00101036 Completed - Clinical trials for Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer

Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

Start date: November 2004
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial is studying how well lapatinib works in treating patients with locally advanced or metastatic biliary tract or liver cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Lapatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT00087191 Terminated - Clinical trials for Fallopian Tube Cancer

EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Start date: May 2004
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This clinical trial is studying the amount of EF5 and motexafin lutetium present in tumor cells and/or normal tissues of patients with abdominal (such as ovarian, colon, or stomach cancer) or non-small cell lung cancer. EF5 may be effective in measuring oxygen in tumor tissue. Photosensitizing drugs such as motexafin lutetium are absorbed by tumor cells and, when exposed to light, become active and kill the tumor cells. Knowing the level of oxygen in tumor tissue and the level of motexafin lutetium absorbed by tumors and normal tissue may help predict the effectiveness of anticancer therapy