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Insomnia Due to Mental Disorder clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03730974 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Insomnia Due to Mental Disorder

Ball Blankets on Insomnia in Depression in Outpatient Clinics

Start date: May 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The objective of the study is to examine the efficacy of Protac Ball BlanketsTM (PBB) and specifically if the PBB will extend the total sleep time of patients with insomnia due to depression in two psychiatric outpatient clinics at Aarhus University Hospital and Odense University Hospital. Furthermore, it will be examined whether the PBB will reduce the sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, need for sedatives and hypnotics, the self reported symptoms of depression and anxiety and improve the quality of sleep. 45 with depression and insomnia who receive outpatient treatment will be included in this study. The study is a randomized cross-over study. The data collection period lasts four weeks. Data will be collected using actigraphs, sleep diaries and questionnaires.

NCT ID: NCT03122080 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Insomnia Due to Mental Disorder

Efficacy of EA on Depression Related Insomnia: Study Protocol for a Multicenter RCT

Start date: November 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The investigators describe a protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial to find out the efficacy of electroacupuncture for depression related insomnia.

NCT ID: NCT03000894 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Insomnia Due to Mental Disorder

CBT-I as Early Intervention of Mood Disorders

Start date: January 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of transdiagnostic nurse-administered 4-session group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) plus standard care, compared to standard care alone, for improving sleep and daytime function, enhancing recovery, preventing relapses, and reducing medication burden in patients with the first episode of mood disorders.