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NCT ID: NCT03767244 Not yet recruiting - Prostatic Neoplasms Clinical Trials

A Study of Apalutamide in Participants With High‑Risk, Localized or Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Who Are Candidates for Radical Prostatectomy

Start date: February 15, 2019
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine if treatment with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plus apalutamide (with or without abiraterone acetate with prednisone [AAP]) before and after radical prostatectomy in participants with high-risk localized or locally advanced prostate cancer results in an improvement in pathological complete response (pCR) rate and metastasis-free survival (MFS), as compared to ADT plus placebo.

NCT ID: NCT03761147 Active, not recruiting - Bowel Dysfunction Clinical Trials

Gastrointestinal Activation Post-elective CS (Cesarean Section) :A Comparison of Paula Method to Standard Care

Start date: February 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Women generally report discomfort and a delay in GI motility after CS. The Paula method, circular exercises of ring muscles has been shown to increase GI motility. This method had not been studied in women post CS. The current study is comparing the resumption of bowel sounds after CS in women utilizing the Paula exercises to standard care (no exercises).

NCT ID: NCT03758586 Completed - Spatial Learning Clinical Trials

Spatial Skill Training for Robot-assisted Surgery

Start date: January 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Surgical residents from a single tertiary medical center were divided into 2 groups. All residents performed 2 tasks on a Da Vinci robotic simulator system after which they were either given a real training session in spatial skills (study group) or shown a short presentation regarding robotic surgery. After training/watching the presentation, they repeated the for mentioned tasks on the robotic simulator. Improvement in surgeon performance, especially regarding tissue damage was documented.

NCT ID: NCT03756740 Not yet recruiting - Low Back Pain Clinical Trials

The Effectiveness of Telerehabilitation Modalities in Physical Therapy in the Management of Chronic Low Back Pain

Start date: February 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Low back pain (LBP), a common disorder, causes disability, functional decline and high health care costs. Patient care programs include specific exercises for promoting function and improving health. Self-practice and adherence to treatment are important for treatment success and better outcomes. Telerehabilitation (TR) might improve patient symptoms, compliance to treatment and reduce patient symptoms, however, its effectiveness in treating LBP, still needs further investigation. The overall aim of this study will be to examine the effectiveness of combining telerehabilitation within physical therapy treatments for patients with LBP

NCT ID: NCT03756545 Recruiting - Trauma Clinical Trials

Neurobehavioral Moderators of Post-traumatic Disease Trajectories

Start date: January 20, 2015
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

The research goal is to uncover the neurocognitive moderators of PTSD trajectories, by documenting clinical symptoms, cognitive functioning, and brain structure and function, one-, six- and fourteen months following a traumatic event, in a large population of survivors at initial high risk for PTSD.

NCT ID: NCT03755908 Not yet recruiting - Asthma in Children Clinical Trials

Sensitivity of Forced Oscillation Technique in Children With Asthma and Normal Spirometry

Start date: December 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Exhibiting variable airway obstruction is a key factor in the diagnosis of asthma but too often it is undetected by spirometry. Study hypothesis: The forced oscillation technique (FOT) will show airway obstruction in asthmatic children with normal spirometry pointing out its advantage in measuring AW obstruction in this population. We will conduct a prospective observational study in 6-18 years old children with the diagnosis of asthma and a normal spirometry results. Each subject will undergo evaluation including: asthma control questionnaire, spirometry, FOT and Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) to assess the sensitivity of FOT in diagnosing airway obstruction in this circumstances.

NCT ID: NCT03754985 Completed - Hyperoxia Clinical Trials

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Effects on Pulmonary Functions

PulmHBOT
Start date: January 2016
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Prospective analysis included patients, 18 years or older, scheduled for 60 daily HBOT sessions between 2016-2018. Each session was 90 min of 100% oxygen at 2 ATA with 5 minutes air breaks every 20 min, five days per week. Pulmonary functions,measured at baseline and after HBOT,included forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow rate (PEF).

NCT ID: NCT03750812 Not yet recruiting - Physical Activity Clinical Trials

The Effect of Age, Physical Fitness and a Single Bout of Aerobic Exercise on Motor and Cognitive Functions

Start date: December 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The proposed study is intended to examine the connection between two types of inhibition - cognitive and motor and the connection between motor inhibitory functions and a single bout of physical exercise in the context of age and physical fitness.

NCT ID: NCT03748641 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

A Study of Niraparib in Combination With Abiraterone Acetate and Prednisone Versus Abiraterone Acetate and Prednisone for Treatment of Participants With Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Start date: January 14, 2019
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of niraparib in combination with abiraterone acetate and prednisone (AA-P) compared to AA-P plus placebo.

NCT ID: NCT03748290 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Spinal Cord Injuries

Effect of Preventional Drug Therapy on Pain Regulation Mechanisms Among SCI

Start date: August 23, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Central neuropathic pain (CNP) is defined as chronic pain due to injury or disease in the central nervous system. This pain is most common among people with a spinal cord injuries (SCI), with a prevalence of about 50%. The central pain usually develops within a few months of spinal cord injury - and this period is significance in terms of this research work. This pain is one of the most complex and challenging pain syndromes. One of the reasons for this stems from its adherence to most treatments. Another reason is that there is partial information about the mechanism responsible for its development. Animal studies suggest that it is possible to prevent and / or reduce its development or reduce its strength by preventive treatment (given immediately after the injury). Currently, the treatments found to prevent or reduce central pain in animals are anti Inflammation and neuronal excitability suppressors such as interleukin 10. The purpose of this study,is to explore whether pre-treatment with pregabalin prior to the development of the central pain will prevent the incidence of pain or reduce its intensity by improving pain regulation and reducing hypersensitivity. The goal of the pharmacotherapy is to reduce the hypersensitivity- lyrica is used to reduce chronic neuropathic pain by reducing the degree of hypersensitivity in the pain system. the objectives of this study are to examine whether early treatment of central pain can prevent or reduce the incidence of pain by improving pain regulation and reducing hypersensitivity. That is, whether there will be a difference between those who take Lyrica-Pregabalin (a drug that reduces hypersensitivity of pain) compared to placebo. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which people with a fresh SCI will receive lyrica or placebo as soon as possible from their arrival at the rehabilitation hospital for 2-3 months during which pain system characteristics will be measured and monitored for central pain development.