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NCT ID: NCT05431361 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Living Donor Liver Transplantation

PRehab tO PreparE Living Liver Donors for Enhanced Recovery

PROPELLER
Start date: May 4, 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

1. to determine if a Phase III RCT of prehab vs usual care for LLDs is feasible (including rates of recruitment, adherence, adverse events, and attrition); 2. to determine what, if any, intervention or trial modifications are warranted for a Phase III RCT; and, 3. to explore estimates of efficacy among donor-centered outcomes (e.g., quality of life, physical function, satisfaction with care) that may form the basis for sample size calculations of a Phase III RCT.

NCT ID: NCT05430464 Not yet recruiting - Acne Vulgaris Clinical Trials

A Study of a Laser for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris

Start date: June 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the onset, duration, efficacy and safety of the laser for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

NCT ID: NCT05430152 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Post-Viral Fatigue Syndrome

Low-dose Naltrexone for Post-COVID Fatigue Syndrome

Start date: July 2022
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This study aims to determine if low-dose naltrexone (LDN) reduces fatigue, improves related symptoms, and reduces inflammatory markers in peripheral blood in cases with Post-COVID-19 Fatigue Syndrome (PCFS) from COVID-19 (i.e. confirmed SARS-CoV-2 case) in the past 3-6 months. LDN refers to naltrexone given in doses of 1-4.5 mg. Overall, studies have found that LDN is safe and well-tolerated. It may help to reduce pain and inflammation and improve well-being and immune function.The trial will be conducted by the Complex Chronic Diseases Program (CCDP) at BC Women's Hospital and the Post-COVID Recovery Clinics (PCRC) in British Columbia and will demonstrate whether LDN could benefit a large number of people with PCFS.

NCT ID: NCT05429996 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Ultrastructural Collagen Markers in Ehlers Danlos Syndromes

Start date: July 1, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Establishing the diagnosis of Ehlers Danlos Syndromes (EDS)/generalized hypermobility spectrum disorders (G-HSD) is often problematic for patients. The absence of a precise unifying diagnosis in patients results in a significant emotional burden on the patient and caregivers, not to mention the hidden costs, including multiple recurring visits to several medical specialists and associated social and economic costs. To date, while collagen ultra-scale morphological heterogeneity has been used to comment on an EDS diagnosis, the mechanical properties of the collagen remain mostly unexplored. From a biophysical point of view, collagen affected with hEDS can be described as biomechanically deficient. In the case of EDS, the skin's abnormal elasticity can be directly related to the organization of the collagen network within the dermis. Quantitative Nanohistology (QNH) is a newer method to evaluate both the structural and mechanical properties of collagen in-situ histological sections. Therefore, the aim of this study is to define histo-biophysical markers of two most common types of EDS i.e. classical EDS (cEDS) & hypermobile EDS (hEDS) at the single collagen fibrils level and matrix and to further explore the origin of collagen fibril properties deficiency in hEDS and cEDS.

NCT ID: NCT05429879 Not yet recruiting - Flexible Cystoscopy Clinical Trials

The Impact of Music on Pain and Anxiety During Flexible Cystoscopies

Start date: June 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Background: Cystoscopy is a routine diagnostic test often performed in the outpatient Urology setting. However, patients may sometimes feel pain and anxiety during this procedure. Distraction therapies, including patient preferred music and classical music may reduce pain and anxiety associated with cystoscopy. However, it is unclear if patient preferred music has greater positive outcomes for patients than classical music. Hypothesis: We hypothesize that patient preferred music during flexible cystoscopies will reduce patient self-reported pain and anxiety scores when compared to classical music and absence of music. Objective: To assess whether a patient's preferred music reduces pain and anxiety during cystoscopies when compared to classical music and the absence of music Methods: This is a prospective randomized control study where patients undergoing flexible cystoscopy in the outpatient Urology clinic will be randomly assigned to one of three groups: Preferred music, classical music, or no music for their procedure. Differences in pain and anxiety will be assessed between groups using the Visual Analog Scale and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scale. Potential Benefits: Identifying and understanding non-pharmacological interventions that can reduce pain and anxiety during cystoscopies is an important task that will allow urologists to better manage these patients.

NCT ID: NCT05429411 Recruiting - Burn Scar Clinical Trials

Nonsilicone Gel Sheet for Burn Hypertrophic Scars

Start date: April 22, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Overview: The application of gel sheets holds promise for both the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scar after deep dermal injuries. Although some positive results have been published, a Cochrane review of the data concluded that the trials were of poor quality therefore only provided weak evidence for their benefit. One of the limitations of previous studies has been the subjectivity and potential bias of the evaluation tools that were used. The validation of electronic instrumentation for the measurement of hypertrophic scar and determination of their superior clinometric properties provides the basis from which precise, systematic, evaluations can now be performed that will allow for confident conclusions to be made. Thus, the objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a non-silicone gel sheet relative to a patient-matched control site in a prospective, randomized, controlled, within-patient study. This study has been piloted and the data used to establish the number of participants that will be required for an adequately powered study. Specific Objectives: 1. To characterize the changes in vascularity, thickness, pain and itch in adult burn hypertrophic scar (HSc) following an extended course of treatment with a non-silicone based gel sheet relative to matched control scars. 2. To characterize the changes in pliability of adult burn HSc following an extended course of treatment with a non-silicone based gel sheet relative to matched control scars. Recruitment: Burn survivors aged 14 years and more, who have developed HSc and are being treated at CHUM and Villa Medica Rehabilitation Hospital. Risks: There is a minimal risk that the gel used in this project might cause minor redness (10-25% if the use instructions are not followed). The rash quickly resolves once the gel sheet is removed. Study Site: This study will be carried out at Villa Medica Rehabilitation Hospital.

NCT ID: NCT05427929 Not yet recruiting - Infant, Premature Clinical Trials

A Pilot Study of Measuring Diaphragm Electrical Activity in Neonates Using a Smaller Inter-electrode Distance

Start date: August 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a mode of ventilation where the electrical activity of the diaphragm (EDI) - a signal representing the baby's respiratory drive - is used to control the timing and amount of assist provided. NAVA was introduced to the market in 2007 and since has been used in more than 40 countries. In the current clinical practice, the Edi signal from the patient is captured with miniature sensors (the size of a hair) embedded in the wall of a specially designed naso/orogastric feeding tube. This FDA and Health Canada approved, commercially available catheter (Getinge, Solna, Sweden), is 6 Fr in size (outer diameter), 49 cm in length and has 8 pairs of sensors that are placed 6 mm apart (so-called inter electrode distance (IED) is 6 mm). While no obvious side effects have been noted by clinicians, for the smallest of neonates, the currently used commercial catheter (size 6F, 49 cm long) may have 'excessive' post-array catheter length. In these neonates, typically those with weight < 750 grams, following the correct placement of catheter as per the electrode array positioning at gastro-esophageal junction, the feeding holes in the catheter may end at the level of distal stomach instead of the desirable mid-stomach location. The changing demographics of the patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) has created a clinical need to redesign the currently used Edi catheter specifically to suit the smallest of patients, such that following adequate placement the feeding holes sit at the level of mid-stomach. Drs. Christer Sinderby and Jennifer Beck in Toronto, Canada, are the original designers of the 6 mm/49 cm currently used Edi catheter. These investigators (at St-Michael's Hospital, Toronto) in collaboration with their team at Neurovent Research Inc. (NVR) have re-designed and invented a new prototype of the current FDA-approved catheter specifically suited for use in extreme premature neonates. They have done so by reducing the interelectrode distance from the originally set 6 mm to 4 mm, which reduces the overall insertion depth to capture the same signal from the diaphragm. All other parameters are exactly same as the original catheter (6F, 49 cm long). In this small feasibility study we wish to provide a clinical proof of concept for the use of this newly designed prototype in 10 extremely premature neonates who are already receiving NAVA ventilation in our NICU.

NCT ID: NCT05427110 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Shearwave Elastography in the Evaluation of Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Start date: May 5, 2022
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is a condition frequently treated in physiotherapy. The pathophysiology underlying this syndrome is still poorly understood. Ultrasound makes it possible to evaluate the morphology and to quantify, with sonoelastography (SWE), the stiffness of the iliotibial band (ITB). The objective is to determine the feasibility of a cross-sectional study aimed at evaluating the morphometry and stiffness of the ITB in runners with and without a diagnosis of ITBS. Socio-demographic and clinical data will be collected and ultrasound measurements (thickness and stiffness) of the iliotibial band will be performed in supine with the knee positioned at 2 different angles (0° and 30° flexion). Variables such as the recruitment rate/month, the inclusion/exclusion rate, the acceptability of the procedure will be used to characterize the feasibility. The relationship between ultrasound measurements and clinical outcomes will be explored. The results obtained will document feasibility issues and provide preliminary results will lay the groundwork for a large scale study.

NCT ID: NCT05426252 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Thalassemia in Children

Thal-Fabs: Reduced Toxicity Conditioning for High Risk Thalassemia

Start date: March 22, 2022
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a novel transplant strategy for the long-term benefit of patients with transfusion dependent high-risk thalassemia.

NCT ID: NCT05425797 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Delivery Modality of BETTER Intervention

The Virtual BETTER Study

Start date: July 2022
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The focus of this project is to examine how delivering virtual care impacts health behaviour change for patients with chronic illnesses compared to in-person visits using a chronic disease prevention and screening (CDPS) program called BETTER (Building on Existing Tools To ImprovE Chronic Disease PRevention and Screening in Primary Care).