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Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive.

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NCT ID: NCT04188405 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Decitabine, Venetoclax, and Ponatinib for the Treatment of Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myeloid Blast Phase or Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

Start date: May 17, 2020
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well the combination of decitabine, venetoclax, and ponatinib work for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid blast phase or accelerated phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking Bcl-2, a protein needed for cancer cell survival. Ponatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving decitabine, venetoclax, and ponatinib may help to control Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid blast phase or accelerated phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.

NCT ID: NCT04060277 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Triplex Vaccine in Preventing CMV Infection in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Start date: October 7, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well Triplex vaccine works in preventing cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in patients undergoing a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. CMV is a virus that may be carried for life and does not cause illness in most healthy individuals. However, in people whose immune systems are lowered (such as those undergoing stem cell transplantation), CMV can reproduce and cause disease and even death. The Triplex vaccine is made up of 3 small pieces of CMV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (the chemical form of genes) placed into a weakened virus called modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that may help produce immunity (the ability to recognize and respond to an infection) and reduce the risk of developing complications related to CMV infection.

NCT ID: NCT03878524 Recruiting - Anemia Clinical Trials

Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

Start date: April 1, 2020
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient's cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.

NCT ID: NCT03560752 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

CMV-MVA Triplex Vaccination of Stem Cell Donors in Preventing CMV Viremia in Participants With Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: August 20, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well multi-peptide CMV-modified vaccinia Ankara (CMV-MVA Triplex) vaccination of stem cell donors works in preventing cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia in participants with blood cancer undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Giving a vaccine to the donors may boost the recipient's immunity to this virus and reduce the chance of CMV disease after transplant.

NCT ID: NCT03438344 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Multi-antigen CMV-Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vaccine in Reducing CMV Related Complications in Patients With Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: December 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well multi-antigen cytomegalovirus (CMV)-modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine works in reducing CMV related complications in patients with blood cancer who are undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT03333486 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Blood Cancer

Start date: December 7, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient?s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT03263572 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Blinatumomab, Methotrexate, Cytarabine, and Ponatinib in Treating Patients With Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive, or BCR-ABL Positive, or Relapsed/Refractory, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Start date: November 29, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab, methotrexate, cytarabine, and ponatinib work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive, or BCR-ABL positive, or acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ponatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving blinatumomab, methotrexate, cytarabine, and ponatinib may work better in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

NCT ID: NCT03147612 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Low-Intensity Chemotherapy, Ponatinib and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive and/or BCR-ABL Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Start date: February 8, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well low-intensity chemotherapy and ponatinib work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and/or BCR-ABL positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia that may have come back or is not responding to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, dexamethasone, methotrexate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with rituximab and blinatumomab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ponatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor helps the bone marrow make recover after treatment. Giving low-intensity chemotherapy, ponatinib, and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

NCT ID: NCT03096782 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With Added Sugar and Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Leukemia or Lymphoma

Start date: October 13, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well an umbilical cord blood transplant with added sugar works with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The umbilical cord blood cells will be grown ("expanded") on a special layer of cells collected from the bone marrow of healthy volunteers in a laboratory. A type of sugar will also be added to the cells in the laboratory that may help the transplant to "take" faster.

NCT ID: NCT02727803 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Personalized NK Cell Therapy After Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Leukemia, Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

Start date: May 19, 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II clinical trial studies how well personalized natural killer (NK) cell therapy works after chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma. This clinical trial will test cord blood (CB) selection for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C1/x recipients based on HLA-killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing, and adoptive therapy with CB-derived NK cells for HLA-C2/C2 patients. Natural killer cells may kill tumor cells that remain in the body after chemotherapy treatment and lessen the risk of graft versus host disease after cord blood transplant.