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Weight Gain clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03567317 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Weight Gain After CPAP Treatment in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

OSA
Start date: March 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this trial is to investigate the mechanisms leading to weight gain during CPAP treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

NCT ID: NCT03551054 Completed - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Healthy for Two, Healthy for You

H42/H4U
Start date: July 22, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Investigators conducted a pilot feasibility and acceptability randomized controlled trial of a remotely delivered behavioral health coaching program in pregnancy and postpartum.

NCT ID: NCT03531112 Not yet recruiting - Weight Loss Clinical Trials

Reducing Binge Eating to Prevent Weight Gain in Black Women

Start date: July 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of the proposed study is to pilot a 6-month, cognitive-behavioral binge eating intervention, Appetite Awareness Training (AAT) to reduce binge eating and prevent weight gain for Black women with a BMI > 25 kg/m² and with weekly binge eating episodes. Intervention participants will receive a 8-week group AAT intervention, and will also receive bluetooth-connected scales for daily weighing. Participants will also receive tailored feedback on self-weighing frequency and weight change. We will follow-up with participants at six months.

NCT ID: NCT03505203 Recruiting - Weight Gain Clinical Trials

Sleep-Safe: A Strong African American Families Study

Start date: March 4, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Rapid weight gain during infancy is a powerful, and potentially malleable, risk factor for later overweight and obesity, but limited research has examined the impact of promising interventions when applied to the groups most at risk for rapid weight gain in infancy. The present study examines whether providing mothers of newborns with responsive parenting guidance during the first weeks of life to promote infant sleep and soothing can reduce rapid weight gain for African American infants born in low SES contexts.

NCT ID: NCT03498989 Not yet recruiting - Weight Gain Clinical Trials

Effect of Early Feeding of Breast Milk

Start date: June 21, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Breast milk is an extremely complex and highly variable biofliud that has evolved to nourish infants and protect them from disease whilst their own immune system matures. The composition of human breast milk changes in response to many factors, matching the infants requirement according to its age and other characteristics.

NCT ID: NCT03490734 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Neurobehavioral Plasticity to Regular Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake: An fMRI Experiment

Start date: April 10, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The proposed project will examine the strength, specificity and persistence of neurobehavioral adaptions that occur in the initial period of repeated consumption of a branded sugar sweetened beverage (SSB).

NCT ID: NCT03455712 Completed - Pregnancy Related Clinical Trials

Impact of GWG Tool on Patient Knowledge

Start date: June 27, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Women with singleton pregnancies at one outpatient clinic to be recruited for controlled clinical trial. Over eight weeks, women 15 0/7--22 6/7 weeks' with at least one prior prenatal visit to be enrolled in the control group. Women 6 0/7--14 6/7 weeks' to be enrolled in the intervention group at their first prenatal visit and to receive a pregnancy-specific gestational weight gain card. Women to be encouraged to record their weight at each prenatal care visit. All women to complete a GWG knowledge--based questionnaire at 15 0/7‐22 6/7 weeks'.

NCT ID: NCT03411616 Completed - Eating Behavior Clinical Trials

Eating Behavior, Food Craving and Relation to Excessive Weight Gain in Patients Submitted to Liver Transplantation

Start date: August 23, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Excessive weight gain, obesity and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Traditional methods of assessing dietary intake have failed to demonstrate an association between these problems and dietary intake. Patients with an indication for transplantation due to ethanolic cirrhosis, ex-smokers and those with a previous history of overweight were identified as being at greater risk for overweight and metabolic syndrome, and these factors may be related to the change in eating behavior after the operation. Objective: To evaluate the eating behavior, the occurrence of food craving and relation to weight gain, overweight and obesity after liver transplantation. Method: This is a cross-sectional study in which adult and elderly patients in follow-up at the Hepatic Transplant Outpatient Clinic of the Alpha Institute of Gastroenterology of the Federal University of Minas Gerais were evaluated for eating behavior and food craving. The evaluation of the eating behavior was performed with the help of the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire-R21 (TFEQ-R21), translated version and validated for Portuguese. Food Craving Questionnaires State (FCQ-S) and Trait (FCQ-T) and the Brazilian Inventory of Foods Related to Craving (FCI-Br) were used in the translated and validated versions for Portuguese. Demographic, lifestyle, clinical and anthropometric variables of the evaluated patients were obtained through electronic medical records. Weight gain was assessed by the difference between the current weight and the first post-transplant outpatient weight.

NCT ID: NCT03405246 Recruiting - Childhood Obesity Clinical Trials

KIDFIT: Keeping Ideal Cardiovascular Health Family Intervention Trial

Start date: June 13, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Adverse influences starting in utero may predestine an individual's long- term risk for developing cardiometabolic diseases. The Keeping Ideal CVH (cardiovascular health) Family Intervention Trial (KIDFIT) will test whether preschool-age children, born to overweight/obese (OW/OB (mothers who did or did not experience a diet and lifestyle intervention to reduce GWG: 1) demonstrate more favorable adiposity (body fat %), body mass index percentiles (BMI%), diet quality (DASH diet score), physical activity, and other CVH metrics at baseline according to antenatal intervention status; and 2) respond to an early childhood intervention targeting diet and lifestyle behaviors with improvement in these same adiposity and CVH metrics. We hypothesize children randomized to the KIDFIT diet and lifestyle intervention group at age 3-5 years, regardless of initial maternal antenatal group assignment, will demonstrate more favorable adiposity changes assessed by anthropometry (body fat %/sum of skinfolds) and a lower cumulative incidence of obesity after the 12-month intervention, as compared with the control group. Additionally, after 12 months of the KIDFIT Intervention, children will have more favorable blood pressure and blood lipids, better diet quality (as measured by the DASH-style diet score), increased physical activity levels, and more optimal sleep duration, without adverse effects on height, compared to the control group

NCT ID: NCT03397940 Recruiting - Physical Activity Clinical Trials

Role of Structured Days on Weight Gain

Start date: March 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Summer vacation is a 3-month window of vulnerability for children from low-income households when health behaviors and academic learning decay. The goal of this project is to collect information on where low-income children go during summer, what they do when they get there, and how their behaviors (physical activity, sedentary, sleep, and diet) differ between the summer (unstructured days) and school year (structured days). This study is 1) significant because it will provide evidence on potential points of intervention that can reduce or reverse the excessive unhealthy weight gains that occur during summer and 2) innovative because it will be the first to identify changes in activity, sedentary, sleep, and dietary behaviors during prolonged and shorter periodic breaks from school and link these behaviors to changes in zBMI over time.