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Tobacco Use Disorder clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Tobacco Use Disorder.

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NCT ID: NCT03707600 Not yet recruiting - Nicotine Dependence Clinical Trials

State and Trait Mediated Response to TMS in Substance Use Disorder

Start date: October 19, 2018
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

OBJECTIVES: The current protocol seeks to develop brain-based intermediate phenotypes of response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in chronic substance use disorder (SUD). To date the field has relied on subjective reports, behavioral performance, and long-term clinical outcomes as primary measures of TMS efficacy. While certainly ecologically valid, these observable behaviors lack the sensitivity necessary to fully quantify the effects (or lack thereof) across both individual participants and TMS intervention protocols. This proposed within-subjects design seeks to leverage differences in metaplasticity that is, the context in which stimulation occurs-by studying the response to stimulation in both sated and abstinent states. It is predicted these state manipulations will potentiate response to TMS. When a disruptive allostatic load like chronic nicotine exposure or acute abstinence is placed on the brain, the underlying network becomes less stable and thus more susceptible to TMS intervention. For SUD in general and tobacco use disorder (TUD) in particular, this state dependence of TMS response is a potentially valuable tool to improve a given intervention s clinical efficacy. STUDY POPULATION: Physically and psychiatrically healthy smokers will be recruited. A comparison group of non-smokers will be concurrently enrolled. We estimate we will require n=51/group of completers to have sufficient power to develop the intermediate phenotypes of TMS. DESIGN: The protocol is a two group, between/within subject, fully counterbalanced design. The between-subjects factor is GROUP (smoker/non-smoker) and the within-subjects factor for each GROUP is TMS CONDITION (active/sham). Additionally, and for the smoker group, nicotine STATE (sated/abstinent) is a nested within-subjects factor. Each group will receive single sessions of active and sham intermittent theta burst stimulation to left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, followed immediately by an MRI scan to characterize the acute neurobiological response to stimulation. Smokers will repeat these procedures both during smoking satiety and following an ~48-hour period nicotine abstinence. OUTCOMES PARAMETERS: In addition to subjective and behavioral task performance changes associated with TMS intervention, changes in MRI BOLD signal will be used to characterize the neurobiological response to TMS intervention across groups and states. Taken together, the development of brain-based markers of TMS response may thus improve both our mechanistic understanding of the causal dysfunctions of TUD as well as the potential efficacy of these interventions longer term to address the relevant clinical characteristics of the disease and ultimately improve treatment outcomes.

NCT ID: NCT03700112 Not yet recruiting - Nicotine Dependence Clinical Trials

Clinical Study Comparing 7 ENDS Products and 1 Combustible Cigarette Using 2 Delivery Methods.

Start date: November 21, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A Randomized Study Comparing Nicotine Pharmacokinetics of Seven Electronic Cigarette Products and One Traditional Cigarette Across Two Delivery (10 puff and ad- libitum) Conditions, in Healthy Adult Smokers

NCT ID: NCT03694327 Not yet recruiting - Smoking Cessation Clinical Trials

Innovative Digital Therapeutic for Smoking Cessation

Start date: October 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study is comparing the efficacy of two smoking cessation apps.

NCT ID: NCT03691805 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Tobacco Use Disorder

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation - Tobacco Use Disorder

Start date: October 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study aims to detect how transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) affects smokers' inhibitory control, craving and consumption of tobacco goods.

NCT ID: NCT03635333 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Nicotine Use Disorder

Effects of E-Cigarette Flavors on Adults

Start date: September 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study looks at the effects of flavors when administered with nicotine in e-cigarettes in younger and older adult cigarette smokers.

NCT ID: NCT03634839 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Nicotine Use Disorder

Effects of E-cigarette Flavors on Youth

Start date: September 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study is an examination of the influence of sweet and cooling flavors on the appeal and abuse potential of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes among susceptible youth.

NCT ID: NCT03626064 Completed - Clinical trials for Tobacco Use Disorder

The PROMPT Pilot Study

Start date: June 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The PROMPT Pilot Study is a feasibility mixed methods prospective cohort study following principles of community-based participatory action research. The study recruited 80 people who use drugs and followed them for 6 months while providing access to counselling, nicotine replacement therapy and peer-support in a community setting. A notable reduction in average cigarette use per day (20.5 to 9.3) and illicit substance use (18.8%) was observed at study-end. PROMPT's patient engagement model is an effective harm-reduction strategy for the growing opioid use crisis and can improve the health outcomes of marginalised at-risk populations worldwide.

NCT ID: NCT03625986 Not yet recruiting - Tobacco Dependence Clinical Trials

Does Switching to Nicotine Containing Electronic Cigarettes Reduce Health Risk Markers

Start date: October 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The overall goal of this project is to understand the likely health effects of cigarette smokers switching to a Standardized Research Electronic Cigarette (SREC) and to assess the role of nicotine delivery on switching and acceptability as well as markers of health outcomes. Current smokers who meet all eligibility criteria will completely switch from their combustible (regular) cigarettes to an electronic cigarette (SREC) that either contains 15 mg/ml of nicotine or 0 mg/ml of nicotine in the liquid. The investigators' hypothesis is that attempting to switch to a SREC will result in a reduction in markers of harms to health, as compared with the baseline (smoking) measures. The investigators also hypothesize that nicotine-containing SRECs will facilitate switching from smoking more efficiently than zero nicotine SRECs and will result in a significantly greater improvement in markers of health risk, but will result in higher ratings of dependence on the SREC (as compared to the zero nicotine SREC).

NCT ID: NCT03612960 Not yet recruiting - Tobacco Dependence Clinical Trials

Measuring Neuroadaptations in Response to Very Low Nicotine Content Cigarettes

Start date: September 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The overall goal of this study is to determine if switching to very low nicotine content cigarettes changes the function of brain circuitry involved in incentive salience and executive control among dependent smokers.

NCT ID: NCT03612895 Completed - Smoking, Tobacco Clinical Trials

Proactive Population Health Strategy to Offer Tobacco Dependence Treatment to Smokers

Start date: April 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Health care systems are key channels for delivering tobacco cessation treatment to the smokers in a population. A population-based approach could complement office-based care and offload busy clinicians. The project will conduct population-based proactive outreach to current smokers in a health care system's primary care practices and randomize smokers who respond to the outreach to 3 groups: 2 alternative evidence-based cessation resources or to usual care. Specific Aims: Aim 1: To determine the feasibility and reach of the program Aim 2a: To determine whether the 2 intervention arms combined increase the proportion of smokers who use tobacco cessation treatment over a 6-month follow-up compared to those randomized to usual clinical care. Aim 2b: To determine whether each of the two intervention arms increases the proportion of smokers who use tobacco cessation treatment over a 6-month follow-up, compared to those receiving usual clinical care.