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Subacromial Impingement Syndrome clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

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NCT ID: NCT03326466 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Muscle Function, Central Nervous System Sensitization, and Pain Profiling in Patients With Subacromial Pain (SAP-CNSS).

Start date: November 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

In this case-control study, the investigators compare shoulder muscle function, pain, and central nervous system sensitization in patients with Subacromial Pain (SAP) to that in healthy controls. The investigators also examine if a relationship exists between shoulder symptom duration and central sensitization, shoulder muscle function and shoulder pain distribution in patients with SAP.

NCT ID: NCT03303001 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Comparison Between Subacromial Infiltrations

Start date: September 26, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The shoulder pain is commonly seeing in orthopedic consultation. Many patients was affected in activities of daily living and in laborer absent. One of the first treatment lines is the steroid infiltration for pain relieve, however in several times is only effective by a short period of time, and the symptoms usually appear again. One of the not known infiltration is the high volumen infiltration in subacromial space, this treatment appears to be an effective treatment for this patients.

NCT ID: NCT03246867 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

The Acute Effects of Different Stretching Methods in Individuals With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Start date: August 28, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the acute effects of isolytic and static stretching training in individuals having subacromial impingement syndrome with glenohumeral internal rotation deficit. Isolytic group will receive isolytic stretching in modified cross body position. Static group will receive static stretching in modified cross body position. Stretching groups will be evaluated before and just after stretching exercise. Control group will receive no stretching. Control group will be evaluated for the first time and then will be waited until the duration of the stretching exercise program. Afterwards, second evaluation will be performed

NCT ID: NCT03246698 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

The Effect of Isolytic and Static Stretching Training in Individuals With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Start date: August 28, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effect of isolytic and static stretching training in individuals having subacromial impingement syndrome with glenohumeral internal rotation deficit. Isolytic group will receive isolytic stretching in modified cross body stretching position and standard physiotherapy program. Static group will receive static stretching in modified cross body stretching position and standard physiotherapy program. Control group will receive only standard physiotherapy program.

NCT ID: NCT03186287 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Effectiveness of Eccentric and Concentric Strength Training in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Start date: September 21, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of eccentric and concentric strength training on pain, strength, joint position sense and function in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

NCT ID: NCT03109704 Completed - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Thoracic Spine Thrust Manipulation Compared to Sham Manipulation in Individuals With Subacromial Pain Syndrome

Start date: February 1, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the immediate effects of a supine upper thoracic spine thrust manipulation, seated upper thoracic spine thrust manipulation, and sham manipulation for individuals with subacromial pain syndrome. The participants were randomized to receive one of the three interventions and baseline measures for the dependent variables were repeated immediately after the delivery of the intervention.

NCT ID: NCT02747251 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Strengthening Exercises in Shoulder Impingement (SExSI) Trial

Start date: May 13, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the addition of a high dose of simple home-based elastic band strengthening exercises to usual care in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Half of the participants receive instructions in simple home-based elastic band strengthening exercises in addition to usual care, while the other half receive usual care.

NCT ID: NCT02725749 Completed - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Low Level Laser Therapy Associated With Exercise in Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Start date: January 2013
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Objectives: The objective was to compare low level laser therapy (LLLT) therapy versus low LLLT therapy in combination with an exercise or exercise only on pain, range of motion (ROM), functionality, and activity limitation in patients with subacromial impact syndrome. Design: Randomized and placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: The setting for the study was the Municipal Clinic of Barueri, São Paulo, Brazil. Participants: 60 patients with subacromial impact syndrome were randomly assigned in three groups. Interventions: Group I, experimental (n=21) treated with low level laser therapy and exercises; Group II, experimental (n=21) treated with exercises; and Group III, experimental (n=18) treated with low level laser therapy. Laser used were GaAs (904 nm, 60 mW), in continuous emission. The participants received application of laser three times or week for eight weeks, on 9 shoulder points (3 Joules/point) per session. Main outcome measures: Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) score, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), goniometer, Modified-University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale (UCLA), recorded before and after treatment.

NCT ID: NCT02725346 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

ArthroPlanner: A Surgical Planning Solution for Acromioplasty

Start date: July 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A computer-assisted solution for acromioplasty is presented. The software allows surgeons to better plan the surgical procedure by visualizing dynamic simulation of the patient's shoulder joint during everyday activities. Impingements are dynamically detected and the exact location and amount of bone to be resected is precisely computed. As a result, the success of the acromioplasty does not only rely on the surgeon's experience or previous recommendations, but on quantitative data. Although the clinical validation of this 3D planning support is currently under evaluation, it may allow to recover more effectively postoperative joint mobility, to get a better relationship with pain and a better healing rate of the rotator cuff tendons.

NCT ID: NCT02705521 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Comparing Gamification With Remote Monitoring Against Standard Rehabilitation, for Patients After Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression Surgery

GAME
Start date: April 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This randomised prospective controlled trial will investigate patients with impingement syndrome who undergo arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The intervention group will receive physiotherapy aided by automated sensor-based technology which will help them perform exergames and track their rehabilitation progress. The control group will be treated by standard physiotherapy protocols. The two groups will be compared using patient reported outcome measures and assessment of shoulder range of movement before and after the shoulder surgery. Data will be collected on patient experience, engagement with the rehabilitation process and the usability of the sensor-based technology through the use exergames. This will guide development of methods to quantify patient activation and engagement. Hypothesis: 1. There will be a significant clinical difference in post-surgical improvement measured by patient reported outcomes when physiotherapy is aided by automated sensor-based technology to perform Exergames and track progress, compared to standard physiotherapy protocols. 2. There will be a significant difference in post-surgical improvement in range of shoulder movement and patient improvement, measured by patient reported out-comes when physiotherapy is aided by automated sensor-based technology to perform exergames and track progress, compared to standard physiotherapy protocols.