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Subacromial Impingement Syndrome clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

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NCT ID: NCT03658707 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Validity and Reliability of the Turkish Version of the Functional Shoulder Score

Start date: September 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The aim of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Functional Shoulder Score in Turkish patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS).

NCT ID: NCT03525275 Not yet recruiting - Pain, Postoperative Clinical Trials

Effect of Battlefield Acupuncture and Physical Therapy Versus Physical Therapy Alone After Shoulder Surgery

Start date: May 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to determine the effectiveness of Battlefield Acupuncture (BFA) in addition to usual post-surgical shoulder physical therapy compared to a standard shoulder rehabilitation program in reducing medication use and pain in patients who have undergone shoulder surgery. Measurements of medication (opioid, NSAID, acetaminophen, etc.) use (daily number of pills consumed), pain rating, patient specific functional scale and global rating of change will be taken at 24, 72 hours, 7 days, 14 days and at six weeks post-surgery. It is hypothesized that the inclusion of Battlefield Acupuncture will result in a decrease in medication use and post-surgical pain when compared to rehabilitation alone. The population for this study is male and female DoD beneficiaries, ages 17-55 (17 if cadet) that are not participating in other shoulder research studies. The subjects in the experimental group will receive Battlefield Acupuncture in addition to their respective post-surgical shoulder rehabilitation protocol.

NCT ID: NCT03494192 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Effects of Different Rehabilitation Programme on Pain, Function and AHD in Patients With SPS And Comparison With Healthy Controls

Start date: August 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Abnormal reduction of the AHD has been considered as one of the possible mechanisms in the aetiology of subacromial impingement syndrome. Maintenance of the AHD is crucial for prevention and rehabilitation of rotator cuff related disorders. The development of a rehabilitation treatment plan is based in part on the assessment of scapular motion and muscle deficits in patients with shoulder pain. Rehabilitation should be based on the identified impairments. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of scapula based and scapula&rotator cuff based rehabilitation programs on symptoms, functional limitations and AHD in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome and compare with health population.

NCT ID: NCT03442894 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Dry Needling for Sub Acromial Pain Syndrome

DITTO SAPS
Start date: March 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This trial will investigate the benefit of trigger point dry needling (DN) for individuals with a common cause of shoulder pain - sub-acromial pain syndrome. Sub-acromial pain syndrome, also knowns as SAPS, is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain. Physical therapy treatments are routinely used for treating SAPS. One treatment approach that has been shown to be beneficial is a combination of exercises and manual or manipulative therapy. This approach has been shown to reduce pain and improve overall shoulder function in individuals with SAPS. Recently, a novel treatment approach for SAPS has emerged that involves trigger point DN to muscles of the shoulder and ribcage. Some studies have shown promising results for this approach while others have not found it to be helpful. Overall there is currently little research available on the benefit of trigger point DN for individuals with SAPS. This study will investigate whether adding trigger point DN to a treatment program of exercise and manual therapy provides any benefit to individuals with SAPS. To answer this question, this study will divide subjects into three groups. One group will receive just exercise and manual therapy; one group will receive manual therapy and exercise plus trigger point DN and one group will receive manual therapy and exercise plus a sham trigger point DN treatment. All patients receiving treatment in the study will attend 10 visits to a physical therapy clinic over a 6-week period. Subjects in the dry needling and sham dry needling groups will receive 6 sessions of this treatment in addition to their 10 sessions of exercise and manual therapy. The investigators will assess the effectiveness of the three treatment protocols by measuring patients pain, shoulder function and disability levels. These outcomes will be assessed at baseline, six weeks, 6 months and one year from enrolling in the study. In addition to assessing clinical outcomes following treatment, the investigators will assess the amount of health care utilized by each participant in the year following enrollment in the study. The 3 groups will be analyzed to determine if there is a difference in the amount or type of additional healthcare utilized in the year following study enrollment. Examples of healthcare utilization include x-rays, medication and/or surgical procedures. The investigators hypothesis is that individuals that receive actual trigger point DN in addition to manual therapy and exercise interventions will demonstrate greater improvements in pain, shoulder function and disability when compared to individuals receiving exercise and manual therapy alone or exercise and manual therapy with sham needling. The investigators think these differences in clinical outcomes will be present at each of the follow-up points. Additionally, the investigators hypothesize that individuals receiving actual DN will use less healthcare than those in the other two groups.

NCT ID: NCT03326466 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Muscle Function, Central Nervous System Sensitization, and Pain Profiling in Patients With Subacromial Pain (SAP-CNSS).

Start date: November 13, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

In this case-control study, the investigators compare shoulder muscle function, pain, and central nervous system sensitization in patients with Subacromial Pain (SAP) to that in healthy controls. The investigators also examine if a relationship exists between shoulder symptom duration and central sensitization, shoulder muscle function and shoulder pain distribution in patients with SAP.

NCT ID: NCT03303001 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Comparison Between Subacromial Infiltrations

Start date: September 26, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The shoulder pain is commonly seeing in orthopedic consultation. Many patients was affected in activities of daily living and in laborer absent. One of the first treatment lines is the steroid infiltration for pain relieve, however in several times is only effective by a short period of time, and the symptoms usually appear again. One of the not known infiltration is the high volumen infiltration in subacromial space, this treatment appears to be an effective treatment for this patients.

NCT ID: NCT03246867 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

The Acute Effects of Different Stretching Methods in Individuals With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Start date: August 28, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the acute effects of isolytic and static stretching training in individuals having subacromial impingement syndrome with glenohumeral internal rotation deficit. Isolytic group will receive isolytic stretching in modified cross body position. Static group will receive static stretching in modified cross body position. Stretching groups will be evaluated before and just after stretching exercise. Control group will receive no stretching. Control group will be evaluated for the first time and then will be waited until the duration of the stretching exercise program. Afterwards, second evaluation will be performed

NCT ID: NCT03246698 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

The Effect of Isolytic and Static Stretching Training in Individuals With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Start date: August 28, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effect of isolytic and static stretching training in individuals having subacromial impingement syndrome with glenohumeral internal rotation deficit. Isolytic group will receive isolytic stretching in modified cross body stretching position and standard physiotherapy program. Static group will receive static stretching in modified cross body stretching position and standard physiotherapy program. Control group will receive only standard physiotherapy program.

NCT ID: NCT03186287 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Effectiveness of Eccentric and Concentric Strength Training in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Start date: September 21, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of eccentric and concentric strength training on pain, strength, joint position sense and function in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

NCT ID: NCT03109704 Completed - Clinical trials for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Thoracic Spine Thrust Manipulation Compared to Sham Manipulation in Individuals With Subacromial Pain Syndrome

Start date: February 1, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the immediate effects of a supine upper thoracic spine thrust manipulation, seated upper thoracic spine thrust manipulation, and sham manipulation for individuals with subacromial pain syndrome. The participants were randomized to receive one of the three interventions and baseline measures for the dependent variables were repeated immediately after the delivery of the intervention.