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Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03736707 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Selective High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) for Neonates

Start date: December 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) remains a major respiratory disorder for the increasing preterm population, and its incidence has been confirmed to be increased gradually with decreased gestational age. Previous studies demonstrated incidences of 90% at 24 weeks', 80% at 28 weeks', 57% at 30-31 weeks', and 25% at 35-36 weeks' gestational age(GA). However, these figures were mainly performed in the pre-neonatal acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) era, in which ARDS was usually considered as RDS, and surfactant was therefore used repeatedly. In fact, no studies have indicated beneficial effects of surfactant for adult and pediatric ARDS, and therefore, its exact action for neonatal ARDS was needed to be further elucidated. In 2017, the international ARDS collaborative group provided the first consensus definition for neonatal ARDS, and the exact incidence of neonatal ARDS and mortality were unknown.

NCT ID: NCT03735563 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Surfactant Deficiency Syndrome Neonatal

Premedication for Less Invasive Surfactant Administration

LISA-Med
Start date: November 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

Early respiratory management of preterm infants immediately after birth should be as gentle as possible. With this so-called developmental approach, unnecessary invasive methods can be avoided or at least postponed. This kind of "soft landing" allows cardiorespiratory transition with fewer adverse outcomes. Less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) is a technique that involves delivery of surfactant to a spontaneously breathing infant through a thin catheter. This technique minimizes the risk for neonatal lung injury caused by positive pressure ventilation. LISA is nowadays widely used in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). Although less invasive, newborns exposed to this procedure need premedication prior the procedure. There is no consensus, which drug would be the optimal premedication for LISA and the research on this topic is lacking. An ideal premedication would treat the procedural pain without suppressing the infant's own breathing. The sedation and analgesia should start fast but the effect should be short-acting with as few adverse effects as possible. The aim of this randomized, controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of LISA protocol with the premedication of either ketamine or fentanyl by investigating whether one or the other is associated with lower rate of adverse events, hence would be preferred choice for premedication protocol.

NCT ID: NCT03719937 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Artificial Increase in Chest Wall Elastance as an Alternative to Prone Positioning in Moderate-to-severe ARDS.

ALTERPRONE
Start date: October 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

During moderate to severe ARDS, sessions of prone positioning lead to lung and chest wall mechanics changes that modify regional ventilation, with a final redistribution of tidal volume and PEEP towards dependent lung regions: this limits ventilator-induced lung injury, increases oxygenation and convincingly improves clinical outcome. Physiological data indicate that the increase in chest wall elastance is crucial in determining the benefit by prone positioning on oxygenation. In some patients, however, prone positioning may not be feasible or safe due to particular comorbidities and/or technical issues. In the present pilot-feasibility study enrolling 15 subjects with moderate to severe ARDS in whom prone positioning is contraindicated or unfeasible, we aim at assessing whether and to what extent an artificial increase in chest wall elastance while the patient is in the supine position may yield a significant benefit to oxygenation. The increase in chest wall elastance will be achieved placing 100g/kg weight on the anterior chest wall of the patient while he/she is in the supine position: this approach previoulsy appeared safe and effective in case reports and small case series. Patient's position will be standardized (30 degrees head-up, semi seated position). This one-arm sequential study will evaluate the effects of the procedure on gas exchange, haemodynamics, lung and chest wall mechanics, alveolar recruitment (measured with the nitrogen washout-technique and multiple PV curves) and tidal volume and PEEP distribution (assessed with electrical impedance tomography).

NCT ID: NCT03718507 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Study on the Effects of Different Premedication for LISA on Stress and Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation in Preterm Infants

SAFE LISA
Start date: December 20, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Given the popularity that LISA technique has gainig in worldwide neonatal units, the lack of evidence regarding its premedication is becoming even more relevant to provide the best care to premature infants. Objective of this clinical trial is to establish the best premedication for LISA procedure considering neonatal pain assessed with premature infants pain scale, salivary cortisol levels as an indicator of stress and crSO2 values as indicators of cerebral oxygenation. Moreover, we aim to verify if sucrose 24% given orally is an effective tool for pain management in preterm neonates also in more invasive procedure, comparable to pharmacological treatment.

NCT ID: NCT03715751 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Adaptive Support Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

ARDS
Start date: February 14, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this protocol is to compare standard of care lung protective ventilation settings with an automated ventilator setting, called Adaptive Support Ventilation (ASV), in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This study will compare measurements (i.e. tidal volumes, driving pressure, respiratory rate (RR), compliance, peak airway pressures, plateau pressures, PEEP) with each ventilator technique, and will measure esophageal pressures to compare transpulmonary and respiratory system mechanics.

NCT ID: NCT03715647 Completed - Sepsis Clinical Trials

Correlation of Survival in Puerperae by Electrical Impedance Tomography

COSIPBEIT
Start date: January 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Introduction: Electrical Impedance Tomography (TIE) consists of an equipment that enables the visualization / quantification in real time of the regional distribution of ventilation and pulmonary perfusion, as well as of ventilatory mechanics. Used on the edge of the bed, it is easy to move, non-invasive, allowing a momentary or continuous assessment, guiding the conduct in a safe and precise way through the electrical impedance technology. It is important to note that, in addition to ensuring the efficacy of the patient's behavior, the TIE supports the most diverse types of studies to be performed. These include those based on the effectiveness of the use of the method in the most diverse pulmonary dysfunctions, in the adjustment of the mechanical ventilation and in the average time of hospitalization. Objective: To evaluate the pulmonary function of patients in invasive mechanical ventilation through SIT. Method: This research was carried out in compliance with the National Health Council's Guidelines for Research Involving Human Beings (466/12). The study was a prospective longitudinal clinical-experimental type in which all patients (occasional sampling) used mechanical ventilation and were hospitalized in the Adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia Foundation of Pará, and they developed sepsis with pulmonary repercussions; (DEHG) / HELLP Syndrome and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and who met the inclusion criteria were evaluated and monitored with TIE to perform ventilatory therapy according to the research objectives. The research was carried out in the city of Belém, in the state of Pará, in the adult ICU of the FSCMP. As inclusion criterion, the patient should be in the FSCMP adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU), under mechanical invasive ventilation, previously authorized by the family through the Informed Consent Form to participate in the study.

NCT ID: NCT03712215 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult

STUDY OF ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IN PULMONARY FUNCTION IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

Start date: September 4, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Introduction: The Mechanical Ventilation (MV), a support method used in Intensive Care Units (ICU), reaches approximately 90% of critical patients whose withdrawal process represents 40% of the total time of their use. For this purpose Transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS), which by means of electrodes placed in motor action points on the phrenic nerve tend to provide improvement of the diaphragm muscle function. Objective: To analyze the effect of two protocols of transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation on the ventilatory and cardiorespiratory parameters of critically ill patients. Method: Clinical, longitudinal, prospective, quantitative, single center trial will be performed with 30 (thirty) participants in invasive mechanical ventilatory support, randomly divided into three groups: Experimental Group 1 (GE-1; n = 10) where they will be submitted to the TEDS protocol; Experimental Group 2 (GE-2; n = 10), where they will be submitted to the TEDS protocol based on the studies of Cancelliero et al. (2012); Control Group (GC; n = 10) where they will not be submitted to TEDS. All groups will receive physiotherapeutic care from the staff of the adult ICU of the FHCGV. The interventions will consist of ten sessions of Physical Therapy in each participant in the afternoon shift, for ten consecutive days, 1 time a day. For the TEDS procedure, the Orion TENS II (Orion-SP-Brazil) model will be used, the Wright analogue respirometer (Spire-SP-Brazil) will be used for the minute volume evaluation (V'). The variables of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) will also be monitored in order to verify if the TEDS application interferes with the hemodynamic variables of these patients. The data collected will be linked to Microsoft Office Excel® 2010 software and later transformed into tables and graphs. The information collected will be submitted to statistical analysis through the statistical package SPSS 22.0, applying the descriptive statistics for the characterization of the sample and then selecting the specific tests for the respective variances, adopting a level of significance of p≤0.05 for statistical inferences.

NCT ID: NCT03711565 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Neonatal Respiratory Distress Related Conditions

Oscillatory Versus Non-oscillatory Nasal Continuous Airway Pressure Neonatal Respiratory Support

Start date: September 19, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Controlled randomized trial looking at Standard nasal continuous airway pressure (CPAP) respiratory support versus High Frequency CPAP in neonates who require respiratory support or who are being extubated and require support post extubation. Patients will be evaluated for need to be reintubated and oxygen requirement and PaCO2 levels

NCT ID: NCT03709199 Recruiting - Quality of Life Clinical Trials

Long Term Follow up of Children Enrolled in the REDvent Study

Start date: October 1, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This is a prospective observational follow-up study of children enrolled in a single center randomized controlled trial (REDvent). Nearly 50% of adult Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) survivors are left with significant abnormalities in pulmonary, physical, neurocognitive function and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) which may persist for years.Data in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) survivors is limited. More importantly, there are no data identifying potentially modifiable factors during ICU care which are associated with long term impairments, which may include medication choices, or complications from mechanical ventilator (MV) management in the ICU including ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) or ventilator induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD). The Real-time effort driven ventilator (REDvent) trial is testing a ventialtor management algorithm which may prevent VIDD and VILI. VIDD and VILI have strong biologic plausibility to affect the post-ICU health of children with likely sustained effects on lung repair and muscle strength. Moreover, common medication choices (i.e. neuromuscular blockade, corticosteroids) or other complications in the ICU (i.e. delirium) are likely to have independent effects on the long term health of these children. This proposed study will obtain serial follow-up of subjects enrolled in REDvent (intervention and control patients). The central hypothesis is that preventing VIDD, VILI and shortening time on MV will have a measureable impact on longer term function by mitigating abnormalities in pulmonary function (PFTs), neurocognitive function and emotional health, functional status and HRQL after hospital discharge for children with PARDS. For all domains, the investigators will determine the frequency, severity and trajectory of recovery of abnormalities amongst PARDS survivors after ICU discharge, identify risk factors for their development, and determine if they are prevented by REDvent. They will leverage the detailed and study specific respiratory physiology data being obtained in REDvent, and use a variety of multi-variable models for comprehensive analysis. Completion of this study will enable the investigators to identify ICU related therapies associated with poor long term outcome, and determine whether they can be mitigated by REDvent.

NCT ID: NCT03706586 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Respiratory Distress Syndrome

The Hilo Trial to Improve Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Very Low Birthweight Infants

HiLo
Start date: November 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Preterm birth, or birth before 37 weeks' gestation, is increasingly common, occurring in 8% of pregnancies in Canada. Preterm birth is associated with many health complications, particularly when the birth happens before 29 weeks' gestation. At this gestational age, the lungs are not fully developed and it is not uncommon for infants to have problems breathing at the time of birth. One complication that can arise is when an infant stops breathing and needs to be resuscitated. When preterm babies need to be resuscitated doctors must take special care because of the small infant size and the immaturity of the brain and lungs. Oxygen is used to resuscitate babies who need it, but unfortunately there is disagreement about the best oxygen concentration to use. Oxygen concentration is important because both too much and too little oxygen can cause brain injury. Our research aims to fill this knowledge gap by participating in an international clinical trial to compare the effects of resuscitating babies less than 29 weeks' gestational age with either a low oxygen concentration or a high oxygen concentration. The oxygen concentrations have been selected using the best available knowledge. During the first 2 months of the clinical trial we will treat all babies less than 29 weeks' gestation who need resuscitation with the oxygen concentration we are randomly assigned. Then in the next 2 months, we will treat babies using the other oxygen concentration. After the trial, we will determine whether the babies resuscitated with low oxygen or those resuscitated with high oxygen have better survival and long-term health outcomes. Our research fills a critical knowledge gap in the care of extremely preterm babies and will impact their survival both here in Canada and internationally.