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Recurrent Uveal Melanoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Uveal Melanoma.

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NCT ID: NCT02363283 Suspended - Clinical trials for Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

Glembatumumab Vedotin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Uveal Melanoma

Start date: September 16, 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well glembatumumab vedotin works in treating patients with middle layer of the wall of the eye (uveal) melanoma that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or has returned at or near the same place after a period of time during which the cancer could not be detected (locally recurrent). Glembatumumab vedotin may shrink the tumor by binding to tumor cells and delivering tumor-killing substances to them.

NCT ID: NCT01979523 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

Trametinib With or Without GSK2141795 in Treating Patients With Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

Start date: October 23, 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well trametinib with or without Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 (GSK2141795) works in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Trametinib and GSK2141795 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether trametinib is more effective with or without GSK2141795 in treating patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.

NCT ID: NCT01961115 Active, not recruiting - Recurrent Melanoma Clinical Trials

Epacadostat and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

Start date: September 13, 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase II trial studies how well epacadostat and vaccine therapy work in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma. Epacadostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Vaccines made from peptides and antigens may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Giving epacadostat with vaccine therapy may be an effective treatment for advanced melanoma.

NCT ID: NCT01835145 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

Cabozantinib-S-Malate Compared With Temozolomide or Dacarbazine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Melanoma of the Eye That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: July 31, 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works compared with temozolomide or dacarbazine in treating patients with melanoma of the eye (ocular melanoma) that has spread to other parts of the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether cabozantinib-s-malate works better than temozolomide or dacarbazine in treating patients with melanoma of the eye.

NCT ID: NCT01587352 Suspended - Clinical trials for Stage IV Uveal Melanoma

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic Melanoma of the Eye

Start date: April 20, 2012
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well vorinostat works in treating patients with melanoma of the eye that has spread to other parts of the body. Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT01143402 Active, not recruiting - Iris Melanoma Clinical Trials

Temozolomide or Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Melanoma of the Eye

Start date: June 2010
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies temozolomide to see how well it works compared to selumetinib in treating patients with melanoma of the eye that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Selumetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether temozolomide is more effective than selumetinib in treating melanoma of the eye.