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Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03206047 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Atezolizumab, Guadecitabine, and CDX-1401 Vaccine in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Start date: October 7, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase I/IIb trial studies side effects and best dose of atezolizumab when given together with guadecitabine and CDX-1401 vaccine and to see how well they work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. CDX-1401 vaccine may enhance the expression of the genes encoding tumor antigens on the surface of tumor cells and enhance the activity of tumor-killing T cells against those tumor cells. Vaccines made from monoclonal antibodies combined with tumor cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Giving atezolizumab, guadecitabine, and CDX-1401 vaccine may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT03113487 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

P53MVA and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

Start date: November 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well modified vaccinia virus ankara vaccine expressing p53 (p53MVA) and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving p53MVA and pembrolizumab together may work better in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer.

NCT ID: NCT03029598 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Pembrolizumab and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Start date: March 14, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and carboplatin work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back or has not responded to previous treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab and carboplatin may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT03017131 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Genetically Modified T Cells and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

Start date: August 31, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects of genetically modified T cells and decitabine in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back or has not responded to previous treatments. White blood cells called T cells are collected via a process called leukapheresis, genetically modified to recognize and attack tumor cells, then given back to the patient. Decitabine may induce and increase the amount of the target protein NY-ESO-1 available on the surface of tumor cells. Giving genetically modified T cells and decitabine may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT02996825 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Mirvetuximab Soravtansine and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With FRa-Positive Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Start date: December 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of mirvetuximab soravtansine and gemcitabine hydrochloride in treating patients with folate receptor (FR) alpha-positive ovarian, primary peritoneal, fallopian tube, endometrial, or triple negative breast cancer that has come back. Monoclonal antibodies, such as mirvetuximab soravtansine, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving mirvetuximab soravtansine and gemcitabine may work better in treating patients with FRalpha-positive ovarian, primary peritoneal, fallopian tube, endometrial, or triple negative breast cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02953457 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Olaparib, Durvalumab, and Tremelimumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube or Primary Peritoneal Cancer With BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

Start date: June 29, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of olaparib when give together with durvalumab and tremelimumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutation that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Drugs, such as olaparib, may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and kill tumors cells with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help stimulate the immune system in different ways to attack and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving olaparib with durvalumab and tremelimumab may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02901899 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Guadecitabine and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

Start date: November 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to look at how patients respond to treatment with guadecitabine and pembrolizumab. The researchers will also be looking at the amount of time it takes for cancer to get worse when participants take the study drugs. All participants will be treated with guadecitabine and pembrolizumab. Guadecitabine interferes with the cancer cells' DNA and can increase the production of certain proteins, making cancer cells more recognizable by the immune system. Pembrolizumab helps your immune system to kill cancer cells. Thus the combination of guadecitabine and pembrolizumab may increase the ability of the immune system to eliminate cancer cells. Researchers want to find out whether the combination of guadecitabine and pembrolizumab is effective in treating ovarian cancer that has not responded to traditional chemotherapy. Participants will keep receiving treatment until their cancer gets worse, they have side effects, or they decide they don't want to receive the treatment anymore. After stopping treatment, the study doctor will watch participants for side effects and follow their condition every 6-12 weeks. The study aims to keep track of participants' medical conditions for the rest of their lives. This helps us look at the long-term effects of the study drugs.

NCT ID: NCT02898207 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Olaparib and Onalespib in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Start date: May 19, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of olaparib and onalespib when given together in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery or ovarian, fallopian tube, primary peritoneal, or triple-negative breast cancer that has come back. Olaparib and onalespib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT02853318 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Start date: September 1, 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies the combination of pembrolizumab, bevacizumab, and low dose oral cyclophosphamide in treating patients with recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab and bevacizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways such as boosting your own immune system to find, recognize and kill tumor cells as well as by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth and nutrition. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as low dose oral cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, as well as by further enhancing your own body's immune response against cancer cells. As these three drugs have all been shown to improve the immune response against cancer cells giving pembrolizumab, bevacizumab, and cyclophosphamide together may work better in treating patients with recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02839707 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Atezolizumab and/or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Start date: May 12, 2017
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride with atezolizumab and/or bevacizumab work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. block tumor growth Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known which combination will work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.