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Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03246906 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Comparison of Triple GVHD Prophylaxis Regimens for Nonmyeloablative or Reduced Intensity Conditioning Unrelated Mobilized Blood Cell Transplantation

Start date: August 15, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial includes a blood stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor to treat blood cancer. The treatment also includes chemotherapy drugs, but in lower doses than conventional (standard) stem cell transplants. The researchers will compare two different drug combinations used to reduce the risk of a common but serious complication called "graft versus host disease" (GVHD) following the transplant. Two drugs, cyclosporine (CSP) and sirolimus (SIR), will be combined with either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy). This part of the transplant procedure is the main research focus of the study.

NCT ID: NCT03202628 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Ixazomib Citrate, Pomalidomide, Dexamethasone, and Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: July 24, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well ixazomib citrate, pomalidomide, dexamethasone, and stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient?s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving ixazomib citrate in addition to pomalidomide, dexamethasone, and stem cell transplantation may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03128359 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: June 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase II trial studies how well high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil work in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.

NCT ID: NCT03031730 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

MDM2 Inhibitor AMG-232, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: October 27, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232 when given together with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patient with multiple myeloma that has come back of has not responded to previous treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

NCT ID: NCT03017820 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

VSV-hIFNbeta-NIS in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or T-cell Lymphoma

Start date: April 4, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus carrying the human NIS and IFN beta genes (VSV-hIFNbeta-sodium iodide symporter [NIS]) in treating patients with multiple myeloma, acute myeloid leukemia, or T-cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. A virus, called VSV-hIFNbeta-NIS, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill cancer cells without damaging normal cells.

NCT ID: NCT03015792 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Ibrutinib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma Ineligible for Transplant

Start date: March 10, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the best dose and side effects of ibrutinib when given together with lenalidomide and dexamethasone and how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that are not eligible for transplant. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT02971410 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Simvastatin in Overcoming Chemotherapy Resistance in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: April 2017
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies how well simvastatin works in overcoming chemotherapy resistance in patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Simvastatin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT02948283 Recruiting - Anemia Clinical Trials

Metformin Hydrochloride and Ritonavir in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Start date: March 8, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of metformin hydrochloride and ritonavir in treating patients with multiple myeloma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement or has not responded to treatment. Metformin hydrochloride and ritonavir may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT02765854 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Ixazomib and Dexamethasone Versus Ixazomib, Dexamethasone and Lenalidomide, Randomized With NFKB2 Rearrangement

Start date: September 1, 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well ixazomib and dexamethasone or ixazomib, dexamethasone, and lenalidomide work based on the presence of the rearrangement of a gene called nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 2 (NFKB2) in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking enzymes called proteasomes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lenalidomide may stimulate the immune system against cancer cells and may also prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. It is not yet known whether ixazomib and dexamethasone, or ixazomib, dexamethasone, and lenalidomide are more effective in treating multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT02697344 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

R-(-)-Gossypol Acetic Acid With Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed Symptomatic Multiple Myeloma

Start date: April 14, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of R-(-)-gossypol acetic acid when given together with lenalidomide and dexamethasone and to see how well it works in treating patients with multiple myeloma, also known as plasma cell myeloma, that has come back after a period of improvement or has gotten worse after treatment. R-(-)-gossypol acetic acid may stop the growth of cancer cells by recognizing certain proteins and stimulating programmed cell death. Lenalidomide may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving R-(-)-gossypol acetic acid with lenalidomide and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.