Clinical Trials Logo

Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma.

Filter by:

NCT ID: NCT03856112 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Ixazomib and Dexamethasone With or Without Venetoclax in Treating Patients With Non-t(11;14) Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: June 21, 2019
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the best dose and side effects of venetoclax and how well it works in combination with ixazomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with t(11;14) negative multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax and dexamethasone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how well venetoclax works with ixazomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03841565 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Daratumumab and Dexamethasone With Pomalidomide or Carfilzomib in Treating Patients With Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

Start date: March 31, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab and dexamethasone with pomalidomide or carfilzomib work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back. Immunotherapy with daratumumab may induce changes in body?s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving daratumumab and dexamethasone with pomalidomide or carfilzomib work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03829020 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Metformin and Nelfinavir in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: April 17, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of metformin and nelfinavir in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Metformin may stop the growth of tumor cells by disrupting the energy source within multiple myeloma cells. Nelfinavir may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving metformin and nelfinavir may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03798678 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

CB-839 HCl in Combination With Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: December 26, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the best dose of CB-839 HCl when given together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to previous treatment. CB-839 HCl and carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CB-839 HCl, carfilzomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03770260 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Ixazomib and Pevonedistat in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma That Has Come Back or Does Not Respond to Treatment

Start date: June 7, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This IB trial studies side effects and best dose of pevonedistat when given together with ixazomib in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come or does not respond to treatment. Pevonedistat and ixazomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT03763162 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Daratumumab, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Daratumumab, Ixazomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: January 17, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone followed by daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not response to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daratumumab and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bortezomib and ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone followed by daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone may work better and help to control cancer in patients with multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03710421 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

CS1-CAR T Therapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: June 10, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CS1-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T therapy after chemotherapy in treating patients who have multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immune cells can be engineered to kill multiple myeloma cells by inserting a piece of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into the immune cells using a lentiviral vector such as CS1, that allows them to recognize multiple myeloma cells. These engineered immune cells, CS1-CAR T cells, may kill multiple myeloma cells.

NCT ID: NCT03701321 Suspended - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Daratumumab, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone With or Without Venetoclax in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: January 25, 2019
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone, and how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body's immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bortezomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving venetoclax with daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma compared to standard of care treatment, including chemotherapy.

NCT ID: NCT03622775 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Daratumumab in Treating Participants With Relapsed Multiple Myeloma After Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: April 11, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab works in treating participants with multiple myeloma that has come back after stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with daratumumab, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

NCT ID: NCT03605719 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Dexamethasone, Carfilzomib, & Nivolumab With Reovirus for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: October 24, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of wild-type reovirus when given together with dexamethasone, carfilzomib, and nivolumab in treating participants with multiple myeloma that has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. A virus, called wild-type reovirus, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill tumor cells without damaging normal cells. Giving dexamethasone, carfilzomib, and nivolumab with wild-type reovirus may work better in treating participants with multiple myeloma.