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Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03338972 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Immunotherapy With BCMA CAR-T Cells in Treating Patients With BCMA Positive Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: December 15, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of BCMA CAR-T cells in treating patients with BCMA positive multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. T cells are a type of white blood cell and a major component of the immune system. T-cells that have been genetically modified in the laboratory express BCMA and may kill cancer cells with the protein BCMA on their surface. Giving chemotherapy before BCMA CAR-T cells may reduce the amount of disease and to cause a low lymphocyte (white blood cell) count in the blood, which may help the infused BCMA CAR-T cells survive and expand.

NCT ID: NCT03333746 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Lenalidomide and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: February 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well lenalidomide and nivolumab work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving lenalidomide and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03328936 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Study of Personalized Melphalan Dosing in the Setting of Autologous Transplant

Start date: December 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies the side effects and how well melphalan hydrochloride works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

NCT ID: NCT03311828 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

Copper 64Cu-DOTA-Daratumumab Positron Emission Tomography in Diagnosing Patients With Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

Start date: January 12, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies how well copper 64Cu-DOTA-daratumumab positron emission tomography works in diagnosing patients with multiple myeloma that has come back. Diagnostic procedures, such as copper 64Cu-DOTA-daratumumab positron emission tomography, may help evaluate the extent of multiple myeloma in patients prior to the initiation of treatment and ultimately monitor disease status/response during and post treatment.

NCT ID: NCT03303950 Not yet recruiting - Anemia Clinical Trials

Busulfan, Fludarabine, Donor Stem Cell Transplant, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma or Myelofibrosis

Start date: January 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well busulfan, fludarabine, donor stem cell transplant, and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with multiple myeloma or myelofibrosis. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving busulfan and fludarabine before and cyclophosphamide after donor stem cell may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma or myelofibrosis.

NCT ID: NCT03267888 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Pembrolizumab and Radiation Therapy in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: March 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab and radiation therapy in treating patients with stage I-III multiple myeloma that has come back after a period of improvement or that does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving pembrolizumab and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with stage I-III multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03256045 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Panobinostat, Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: December 31, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well panobinostat, carfilzomib and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Panobinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carfilzomib and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Using multiple myeloma cells from patients' blood samples, the researchers will do laboratory tests to look at how well each of the drugs, alone and in different combinations, kill multiple myeloma cells. If the laboratory tests work well, they may be used in the future to help plan treatment for future patients.

NCT ID: NCT03246906 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Comparison of Triple GVHD Prophylaxis Regimens for Nonmyeloablative or Reduced Intensity Conditioning Unrelated Mobilized Blood Cell Transplantation

Start date: November 2, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial includes a blood stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor to treat blood cancer. The treatment also includes chemotherapy drugs, but in lower doses than conventional (standard) stem cell transplants. The researchers will compare two different drug combinations used to reduce the risk of a common but serious complication called "graft versus host disease" (GVHD) following the transplant. Two drugs, cyclosporine (CSP) and sirolimus (SIR), will be combined with either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy). This part of the transplant procedure is the main research focus of the study.

NCT ID: NCT03202628 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma

Ixazomib Citrate, Pomalidomide, Dexamethasone, and Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Start date: July 24, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well ixazomib citrate, pomalidomide, dexamethasone, and stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy, such as pomalidomide and dexamethasone, before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient?s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving ixazomib citrate in addition to pomalidomide, dexamethasone, and stem cell transplantation may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT03128359 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: May 30, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase II trial studies how well high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil work in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.