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Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma.

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NCT ID: NCT01229943 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: October 15, 2010
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well everolimus and octreotide acetate with or without bevacizumab works in treating patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that cannot be removed by surgery and have spread nearby or to other places in the body. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Octreotide acetate may interfere with and slow the growth of tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab and everolimus also may stop the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether giving everolimus and octreotide acetate together is more effective with or without bevacizumab in treating pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

NCT ID: NCT01204476 Completed - Paraganglioma Clinical Trials

Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

Start date: October 2010
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cixutumumab when given together with everolimus and octreotide acetate in treating patients with advanced low- or intermediate-grade neuroendocrine cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cixutumumab, may find tumor cells and help carry tumor-killing substances to them. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Octreotide acetate may interfere with the growth of tumor cells and slow the growth of neuroendocrine cancer. Giving cixutumumab together with everolimus and octreotide acetate may be a better treatment for neuroendocrine cancer.

NCT ID: NCT01010126 Completed - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

Start date: September 8, 2009
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well temsirolimus and bevacizumab work in treating patients with advanced endometrial, ovarian, liver, carcinoid, or islet cell cancer. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Bevacizumab may also stop the growth of cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Giving temsirolimus together with bevacizumab may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT00454363 Completed - Clinical trials for Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor

Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Cancer

Start date: March 2007
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well pazopanib hydrochloride works in treating patients with advanced neuroendocrine cancer. Pazopanib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking blood flow to the tumor.