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Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03257761 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Guadecitabine and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver, Pancreatic, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

Start date: October 30, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of guadecitabine and how well it works when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with liver, pancreatic, bile duct, or gallbladder cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Guadecitabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving guadecitabine and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with liver, pancreatic, bile duct, or gallbladder cancer.

NCT ID: NCT03095781 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

Pembrolizumab and XL888 in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

Start date: June 28, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of Hsp90 inhibitor XL888 when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. XL888 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving XL888 with pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT03087591 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: April 28, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of APN401 in treating patients with pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, or other solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or have come back. APN401 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT03073785 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil or Capecitabine With or Without Zoledronic Acid in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

Start date: September 16, 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy and fluorouracil or capecitabine with or without zoledronic acid work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends higher doses of x-rays over a shorter period of time directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Zoledronic acid is used in cancer patients to reduce cancer symptoms and may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation. Giving hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy and fluorouracil or capecitabine with or without zoledronic acid may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02896907 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Ascorbic Acid and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: March 21, 2017
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body, has come back, or cannot be removed by surgery. Nutrients found in food and dietary supplements, such as ascorbic acid, may improve the tolerability of chemotherapy regimens. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02890355 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

FOLFIRI or Modified FOLFIRI and Veliparib as Second Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

Start date: September 1, 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well modified irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil (FOLFIRI) and veliparib as a second line of therapy work compared to FOLFIRI in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has come back after a period of improvement (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether modified FOLFIRI and veliparib as second line therapy is more effective than FOLFIRI alone in treating metastatic pancreatic cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02671890 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

Disulfiram and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable Solid Tumors or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

Start date: February 25, 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This partially randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of disulfiram when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride in treating patients with a solid tumor that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and to compare whether disulfiram and gemcitabine hydrochloride may reduce tumor induced muscle loss. Weight loss occurs in pancreatic cancer patients and is common in a multitude of other cancers. Patients with metastatic cancer and weight loss sometimes are not able to receive treatment due to physical weakness or debility. Disulfiram is a potential inhibitor of muscle degradation and may reduce tumor induced muscle wasting. Disulfiram may also help gemcitabine hydrochloride work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet know whether giving gemcitabine hydrochloride with or without disulfiram is a better treatment for unresectable solid tumors or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02650635 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

Start date: February 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib trial studies the best way of TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with a solid tumor that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body (metastatic), progressed for a long time (persistent), come back (recurrent), or is growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressed). TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 together with cyclophosphamide may be a better treatment for solid tumors.

NCT ID: NCT02620865 Suspended - Clinical trials for Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

Bispecific Antibody Armed Activated T-cells With Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

Start date: December 2015
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bispecific antibody armed activated T-cells when given together with aldesleukin and sargramostim and to see how well they work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic). Bispecific antibody armed activated T-cells are the patient's own T cells that are coated with a bispecific antibody comprising 2 antibodies chemically joined together. These antibodies have specific targets and binding properties that may give the T cells a greater ability to seek out, attach to, and kill more cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT02465060 Recruiting - Lymphoma Clinical Trials

NCI-MATCH: Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma

Start date: August 12, 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.