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Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

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NCT ID: NCT03272633 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Irradiated Donor Cells Following Stem Cell Transplant in Controlling Cancer in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

Start date: January 5, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of irradiated donor cells following stem cell transplant in controlling cancer in patients with hematologic malignancies. Transfusion of irradiated donor cells (immune cells) from relatives may cause the patient's cancer to decrease in size and may help control cancer in patients receiving a stem cell transplant.

NCT ID: NCT03011814 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Durvalumab With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Cutaneous or Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

Start date: March 8, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase I/II trial studies the best dose and side effects of durvalumab and to see how well it works with or without lenalidomide in treating patients with cutaneous or peripheral T cell lymphoma that has come back and does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab and lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with cutaneous or peripheral T cell lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT02520791 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Anti-ICOS Monoclonal Antibody MEDI-570 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Follicular Variant or Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

Start date: April 22, 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of anti-inducible T-cell co-stimulator (ICOS) monoclonal antibody MEDI-570 in treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma follicular variant or angioimmunblastic T-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody MEDI-570, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.

NCT ID: NCT02342782 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Yttrium Y 90 Basiliximab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Mature T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: June 8, 2015
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of yttrium Y 90 basiliximab when given together with standard combination chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant in treating patients with mature T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Radioactive substances linked to monoclonal antibodies, such as yttrium Y 90 basiliximab, can bind to cancer cells and give off radiation which may help kill cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, cytarabine, etoposide, and melphalan (BEAM), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving yttrium Y 90 basiliximab and chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant may help kill any cancer cells that are in the body and help make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Stem cells that were collected from the patient's blood and stored before treatment are later returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed.

NCT ID: NCT01897012 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

Start date: July 17, 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alisertib and romidepsin in treating patients with B-cell or T-cell lymphomas that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or have not responded to treatment (refractory). Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving alisertib and romidepsin may be a better treatment for relapsed or refractory B-cell or T-cell lymphomas.

NCT ID: NCT01431209 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell or Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: August 2011
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib phosphate works in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell or peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory) after donor stem cell transplant. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.