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Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma.

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NCT ID: NCT02049541 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

Start date: July 2014
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and the best dose of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor BKM120 when given together with rituximab in treating patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade B-cell lymphoma. PI3K inhibitor BKM120 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Giving PI3K inhibitor BKM120 with rituximab may be an effective treatment for B-cell lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT02037256 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: July 2011
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This clinical trial studies peripheral blood hemapoietic stem cell mobilization with the combination of bortezomib and G-CSF (filgrastim) in multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Giving chemotherapy before a peripheral stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.

NCT ID: NCT01955499 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: September 13, 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide and ibrutinib in treating patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned or not responded to treatment. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving lenalidomide with ibrutinib may work better in treating non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT01839916 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

Start date: April 4, 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase II trial studies how well giving donor T cells after donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. In a donor stem cell transplant, the donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Giving an infusion of the donor's T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) after the transplant may help increase this effect.

NCT ID: NCT01815749 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Genetically Modified T-cell Infusion Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or High-Risk Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: September 27, 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cells following peripheral blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with recurrent or high-risk non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. Giving an infusion of the donor's T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) later may help the patient's immune system see any remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect)

NCT ID: NCT01812005 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: May 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well alisertib with and without rituximab works in treating patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Giving alisertib with and without rituximab may be an effective treatment for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

NCT ID: NCT01678443 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoid Malignancies

Start date: September 1, 1999
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of monoclonal antibody therapy before stem cell transplant in treating patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, such as yttrium-90 anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody BC8, can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving radiolabeled monoclonal antibody before a stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies.

NCT ID: NCT01529827 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

Start date: February 28, 2012
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well giving fludarabine phosphate, melphalan, and low-dose total-body irradiation (TBI) followed by donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy drugs such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan, and low-dose TBI before a donor PBSCT helps stop the growth of cancer and abnormal cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from the donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cell from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and methotrexate after transplant may stop this from happening

NCT ID: NCT01523223 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Donor Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematolymphoid Malignancies

Start date: January 2012
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of donor CD8+ memory T-cells in treating patients with hematolymphoid malignancies. Giving low dose of chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-cancer effects). Giving an infusion of the donor's T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) after the transplant may help increase this effect

NCT ID: NCT01479842 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Start date: December 7, 2011
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of BTK inhibitor PCI-32765 when given together with rituximab and bendamustine hydrochloride in treating patients with recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). BTK inhibitor PCI-32765 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving BTK inhibitor PCI-32765 together with rituximab and bendamustine hydrochloride may kill more cancer cells.