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Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03185494 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Treatment of Relapsed and/or Chemotherapy Refractory B-cell Malignancy by Tandem CAR T Cells Targeting CD19 and CD22

Start date: July 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

RATIONALE: Placing a tumor antigen chimeric receptor that has been created in the laboratory into patient autologous or donor-derived T cells may make the body build immune response to kill cancer cells. PURPOSE: This clinical trial is studying genetically engineered lymphocyte therapy in treating patients with B-cell leukemia or lymphoma that is relapsed (after stem cell transplantation or intensive chemotherapy) or refractory to chemotherapy.

NCT ID: NCT03147885 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Selinexor Plus Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: May 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib/II trial is aimed at studying the combination of a drug named Selinexor (selective inhibitor of nuclear export) in combination with standard therapy for B cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma called R-CHOP. The investigators will establish maximum tolerated dose of Selinexor in combination with RCHOP and also study the efficacy of this combination for therapy of B cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Giving Selinexor plus chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT03097770 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Treatment of Relapsed and/or Chemotherapy Refractory B-cell Malignancy by Tandem CAR T Cells Targeting CD19 and CD20

Start date: April 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

RATIONALE: Placing a tumor antigen chimeric receptor that has been created in the laboratory into patient autologous or donor-derived T cells may make the body build immune response to kill cancer cells. PURPOSE: This clinical trial is studying genetically engineered lymphocyte therapy in treating patients with B-cell leukemia or lymphoma that is relapsed (after stem cell transplantation or intensive chemotherapy) or refractory to chemotherapy.

NCT ID: NCT03035331 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Dendritic Cell Therapy, Cryosurgery, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: March 27, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the best dose and side effects of dendritic cell therapy, cryosurgery and pembrolizumab in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Vaccines, such as dendritic cell therapy made from a person's tumor cells and white blood cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Cryosurgery kills cancer cells by freezing them. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving dendritic cell therapy, cryosurgery and pembrolizumab may work better at treating non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT03015896 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Nivolumab and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: February 14, 2017
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide when given together with nivolumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back and does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab and lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT02950220 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Pembrolizumab and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: January 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib when given together with pembrolizumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Given pembrolizumab and ibrutinib may work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

NCT ID: NCT02869633 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: September 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib works in treating patients after a donor stem cell transplant for lymphoma that is not responding to treatment or has come back. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT02736617 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Obinutuzumab in Combination With Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Start date: May 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well obinutuzumab works in combination with ibrutinib in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Obinutuzumab binds to a protein called cluster of differentiation (CD)20, which is found on B cells and some types of leukemia and lymphoma cells and help the immune system kill cancer cells. Ibrutinib blocks a protein called Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), which may help keep cancer cells from growing. Giving obinutuzumab in combination with ibrutinib may kill more cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT02721407 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Anti-CD22 CAR-T Therapy for CD19-refractory or Resistant Lymphoma Patients

MendCART
Start date: March 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this clinical trial is to study the feasibility and efficacy of anti-CD22:TCRz:4-1BB chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T (CAR-T) cells in treating recurrent patients with refractory or resistant lymphoma to anti-CD19:TCRz:CD28 CAR-T cells. Recently, cancer immunotherapy, treatments aiming to arm patients with immunity specifically against cancer cells, has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy. Among the many emerging immunotherapeutic approaches, clinical trials utilizing CARs against B cell malignancies have demonstrated remarkable potential. CARs combine the variable region of an antibody with T-cell signaling moieties to confer T-cell activation with the targeting specificity of an antibody. Thus, CARs are not MHC-restricted so they are not vulnerable to MHC down regulation by tumors. However, defined by the recession of evaluable lesions, the persistence and efficacy of CAR-T cells are still restricted by the "target" selection. Previous clinical studies largely utilized CD19 for the in vivo targeting of CAR-T cells, which preferentially become refractory or resistant due to the heterogeneity of lymphoma. This clinical investigation is to test a hypothesis whether anti-CD22 CAR-T cells work more effective in lymphoma patients refractory or resistent to anti-CD19:TCRz:CD28 CAR-T cells.

NCT ID: NCT02706392 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

Genetically Modified T-Cell Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced ROR1+ Malignancies

Start date: March 16, 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cell therapy in treating patients with receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 positive (ROR1+) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), or triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Genetically modified therapies, such as ROR1 specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells, are taken from a patient's blood, modified in the laboratory so they specifically may kill cancer cells with a protein called ROR1 on their surfaces, and safely given back to the patient after conventional therapy. The "genetically modified" T-cells have genes added in the laboratory to make them recognize ROR1.