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Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma.

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NCT ID: NCT03049618 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein and Pembrolizumab, MK-3475

Start date: March 10, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase IIa trial studies how well recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body or head and neck squamous cell cancer that has come back or spread to other places in the body. Recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung or head and neck squamous cell cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02706691 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 in Treating Patients With FGFR1-3 Translocated, Mutated, or Amplified Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

Start date: March 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase IIa trial studies how well pan fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) kinase inhibitor BGJ398 works in treating patients with FGFR1-3 translocated, mutated, or amplified head and neck cancer that has returned after a period of improvement. Pan FGFR kinase inhibitor BGJ398 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT02646319 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

Start date: January 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase II trial studies how well nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin works in treating patients with cancer that as has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced cancer) and that has an abnormality in a protein called mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). Patients with this mutation are identified by genetic testing. Patients then receive nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin, which may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking the mTOR enzyme, which is needed for cell growth and multiplication. Using treatments that target a patient's specific mutation may be a more effective treatment than the standard of care treatment.

NCT ID: NCT02474368 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma

Study Evaluating a Stereotactic Boost/Treatment for Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Head and Neck

Start date: November 2015
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This research study seeks to gain new knowledge about the addition of a carefully targeted "boost" dose of radiation as a possible treatment for recurrent or metastatic head or neck cancer. The name of the study intervention involved in this study is stereotactic body radiotherapy, which is a way of delivering radiation in a more precisely targeted way and with a higher dose than conventional radiotherapy.

NCT ID: NCT02467738 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma

Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Cesium-131 Brachytherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

Start date: March 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies cesium Cs 131 brachytherapy in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has come back (recurrent) and can be removed by surgery. Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Radioactive drugs, such as cesium Cs 131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Permanently implanting cesium Cs 131 into the wound bed after surgery may help treat microscopic cancer cells that may be in the tissue after surgical removal of the tumor.

NCT ID: NCT02465060 Recruiting - Lymphoma Clinical Trials

NCI-MATCH: Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma

Start date: August 12, 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT02318771 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

Start date: February 2015
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This randomized clinical trial studies radiation therapy and MK-3475 in treating patients with head and neck cancer, kidney cancer, melanoma, or lung cancer that has returned, has spread to other parts of the body, or cannot be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as MK-3475, may block tumor growth by targeting certain cells and causing the immune system to attack the tumor. Studying the effects of MK-3475 with radiation therapy on the body may help doctors learn whether it may be an effective treatment for these solid tumors.

NCT ID: NCT01846091 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

Start date: April 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of viral therapy in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck that has returned (come back) after a period of improvement or has spread to other parts of the body or breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. A virus called encoding thyroidal sodium iodide symporter, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill tumor cells without damaging normal cells.

NCT ID: NCT01727076 Completed - Clinical trials for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

Start date: February 15, 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of recombinant interleukin-15 in treating patients with melanoma, kidney cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, or head and neck cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Recombinant interleukin-(IL)15 is a biological product, a protein, made naturally in the body and when made in the laboratory may help stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing.

NCT ID: NCT01696955 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Cetuximab With or Without Tivantinib in Treating Patients With Head and Neck Cancer That Is Recurrent, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: August 20, 2012
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well cetuximab with or without tivantinib works in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has come back (recurrent), has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Tivantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether cetuximab is more effective with or without tivantinib in treating patients with head and neck cancer.