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Recurrent Endometrial Cancer clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03277482 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma

Durvalumab, Tremelimumab + Radiotherapy in Gynecologic Cancer

Start date: November 20, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This research study is evaluating the safety and effectiveness of 2 immunotherapy drugs in combination with radiation therapy as a possible treatment for recurrent or metastatic gynecologic cancer. The names of the immunotherapy drugs involved in this study are: - Durvalumab - Tremelimumab

NCT ID: NCT02899793 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

Pembrolizumab in Ultramutated and Hypermutated Endometrial Cancer

Start date: September 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Primary Objectives: To assess the antitumor activity (proportion of objective response by RECIST 1.1 criteria) of pembrolizumab with objective tumor response in patients with persistent, recurrent or metastatic endometrial cancer harboring an ultra-mutated or hyper-mutated (MMR gene-defective) phenotype identified by next generation sequencing (NGS) and comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). To determine the nature and degree of toxicity of pembrolizumab as assessed by CTCAE in patients with persistent, recurrent or metastatic endometrial carcinoma. Secondary Objective(s): To estimate the duration of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

NCT ID: NCT02788708 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

Lenvatinib and Weekly Paclitaxel for Patients With Recurrent Endometrial or Ovarian Cancer

Start date: May 27, 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenvatinib mesylate when given together with paclitaxel in treating patients with endometrial, ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back or grown. Lenvatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking a protein needed for cell growth and may block the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving lenvatinib mesylate and paclitaxel together may work better in treating patients with endometrial, ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02755844 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

Safety and Efficacy of Metronomic Cyclophosphamide, Metformin and Olaparib in Endometrial Cancer Patients

ENDOLA
Start date: April 2016
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Endometrial cancer ranks 11th in terms of incidence (7275 / year) and mortality (2025 deaths/ year). The 5-year overall survivals of patients at diagnosis with locally advanced and metastatic carcinomas are about 50% and 15% respectively. Beyond first line treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy, there is lack of effective drug in this disease, which explains the poor prognosis of patients. The prognosis of metastatic endometrial cancer patients is poor, and few drugs have been shown to be effective beyond first chemotherapy line. Endometrial carcinomas are characterized by frequent alterations of PI3K-AKT-mTor; IGF1R and of DNA repair pathways. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) and DNA repair pathways interact, and inhibition of PI3K-AKT-mTor signaling pathway may alter DNA damage repair. Metronomic cyclophosphamide regimen may increase the anti-proliferative effects of olaparib because it is an alkylating agent, and it exerts anti-angiogenic effects, with a favorable toxicity profile. Metformin may increase the anti-proliferative effects of olaparib because it downregulates IGF1R and PI3K-AKT-mTor pathways, with no additive toxicity.

NCT ID: NCT02549989 Recruiting - Endometrial Cancer Clinical Trials

Study of LY3023414 for the Treatment of Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

Start date: September 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of LY3023414 in treating the participants type of cancer and to determine the types and severity of side effects caused by treatment with LY3023414.

NCT ID: NCT02117817 Withdrawn - Ovarian Cancer Clinical Trials

Phase I BKM120/Abraxane in Solid Tumors, Expansion Phase Recurrent Endometrial or Ovarian Cancer

Start date: February 2015
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of the first part of this study or the dose escalation portion of the study is to determine what dose of BKM120 and Abraxane is safe to give when the two drugs are used at the same time in patients who are diagnosed with a solid cancer. A solid cancer is a cancer that does not involve the blood, bone marrow or lymph nodes. Dose escalation determines the least toxic and most effect dose of this drug combination for treatment. Once this dose is established, it will be used for the dose expansion phase of the study where we will determine the effect of BKM120 and Abraxane in women diagnosed with a recurrent endometrial or ovarian cancer. We will see whether the combination of both drugs improves the response and survival of patients treated on the two drug regimen. Also we will try to find out whether there are changes in tumors that can help us determine what patients are more likely to respond to BKM120 and Abraxane.

NCT ID: NCT01454479 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

A Phase I Study of Lapatinib (Tykerb) Plus Ixabepilone (Ixempra) as 2nd-line Treatment for Patients With HER-2 Overexpressed Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Carcinoma or Carcinosarcoma

Start date: March 2011
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

Endometrial cancer (EC) is the 8th most common female cancer in Taiwan. Its incidence is increasing in the recent few years, around 1,200 new cases per year. The outcome of recurrent EC is disappointing, except focal recurrences that could be irradiated or removed. Chemotherapy is currently the most common salvage treatment for recurrent endometrial cancer. However, the response rate (RR) to 2nd-line treatment is approximately 0-27.3%, with short median time to progression, 2-3.9 months and low overall survival, 6.4-11 months. Due to progress of studies on the molecular and genetic basis of cancer and cellular signaling pathways, targeted therapy has been developed for various cancer treatments. A Gynecologic Oncology Group study found 44% of advanced endometrial cancer had HER>=2+ and the ratio of HER2:chromosome 17 (CEP17) >=2. Another study showed that HER>=2+ was seen in 47% of carcinosarcoma. These evidences indicated HER2 gene amplification and HER2 overexpression occur in endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma, especially in those of high grade and recurrence. Lapatinib (L), an oral inhibitor of both EGFR(epidermal growth factor receptor) and HER2(human epidermal growth receptor), has been shown to be an effective treatment in HER2/neu overexpressing metastatic breast cancer. Ixabepilone is a semisynthetic analog of the natural product epothilone B, and recently has been approved by US Food and Drug Administration as a treatment option in metastatic breast cancer. It was also observed that lapatinib + ixabepilone killed more breast tumor cells than trastuzumab + paclitaxel in vitro. Two GOG(Gynecologic Oncology Group) studies had reported that weekly Ixabepilone as 2nd-line chemotherapy provided a similar RR to 3-weekly regimen of 14.3% in platinum- and taxane-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer with less severe toxicities. The combination of lapatinib and ixabepilone is expected to become an effective treatment for recurrent endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma, but the ideal dose is yet to be surveyed.