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Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma.

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NCT ID: NCT03403634 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma

Celecoxib, Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b, and Rintatolimod in Treating Patients With Colorectal Cancer Metastatic to the Liver

Start date: February 1, 2018
Phase: Early Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This early phase I trial studies how well celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that as spread to the liver. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Recombinant interferon alfa-2b is a substance that can improve the body's natural response and may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Rintatolimod may stimulate the immune system. Giving celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod may work better at treating colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver.

NCT ID: NCT03095781 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

Pembrolizumab and XL888 in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

Start date: June 28, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of Hsp90 inhibitor XL888 when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. XL888 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving XL888 with pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT03087591 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: April 28, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of APN401 in treating patients with pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, or other solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or have come back. APN401 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT03043313 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With HER2+ Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: June 23, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well the HER2 inhibitor tucatinib (ONT-380, ARRY-380) works in combination with trastuzumab in treating patients with HER2-positive (HER2+) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Tucatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking HER2, a receptor needed for cell growth in patients with HER2+ tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of HER2+ tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving tucatinib and trastuzumab in combination may work better in treating patients with HER2+ metastatic CRC.

NCT ID: NCT02973672 Recruiting - Colon Cancer Clinical Trials

Phase I of SGM-101 in Patients With Cancer of the Colon, Rectum or Pancreas

Start date: January 2016
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the safety and performance of SGM-101, a Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA)-specific chimeric antibody conjugated with a NIR emitting fluorochrome, for the visualization of CEA-expressing cancers during surgery. SGM-101 is injected 2 to 4 days before surgery and visualized using an optimized camera system.

NCT ID: NCT02873195 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma

Capecitabine and Bevacizumab With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: July 7, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and capecitabine with or without bevacizumab work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is not responding to treatment and has spread to other places. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab with capecitabine and bevacizumab may be a better way in treating colorectal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02713373 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer

Cetuximab and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Colorectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: August 5, 2016
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of cetuximab when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetixumab and pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.

NCT ID: NCT02650635 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

Start date: February 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase Ib trial studies the best way of TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with a solid tumor that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body (metastatic), progressed for a long time (persistent), come back (recurrent), or is growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressed). TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 together with cyclophosphamide may be a better treatment for solid tumors.

NCT ID: NCT02508077 Terminated - Clinical trials for Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer

FOLFIRI and Panitumumab in Treating Patients With RAS and BRAF Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: February 16, 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, and irinotecan hydrochloride (FOLFIRI) together with panitumumab work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that expresses the RAS and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) wild-type genes, has spread from the original site of growth to another part of the body (metastatic), resists the effects of treatment with prior cetuximab (or panitumumab) plus irinotecan hydrochloride-based therapy, and who have failed at least one subsequent non-anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) containing treatment regimen. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving FOLFIRI together with panitumumab may be an effective treatment for colorectal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02465060 Recruiting - Lymphoma Clinical Trials

NCI-MATCH: Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma

Start date: August 12, 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.