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Recurrent Colon Carcinoma clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03365882 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Rectal Adenocarcinoma

S1613, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2/Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: October 9, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT02465060 Recruiting - Lymphoma Clinical Trials

NCI-MATCH: Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma

Start date: August 12, 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

NCT ID: NCT02393755 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IVA Colon Cancer

Nintedanib and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: May 8, 2015
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of nintedanib when given together with capecitabine and to see how well they work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Nintedanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It may also block the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nintedanib with capecitabine may be a better treatment for colorectal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT01902173 Suspended - Recurrent Melanoma Clinical Trials

Akt Inhibitor GSK2141795, Dabrafenib, and Trametinib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Cancer

Start date: July 19, 2013
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 when given together with dabrafenib and trametinib and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IIIC-IV cancer. Akt inhibitor GSK2141795, dabrafenib, and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving Akt inhibitor GSK2141795 with dabrafenib and trametinib may be a better treatment for cancer.

NCT ID: NCT01802320 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IVA Colon Cancer

Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: March 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (Akt) inhibitor MK2206 works in treating patients with previously treated colon or rectal cancer that has spread from the primary site to other places in the body or nearby tissue or lymph nodes and cannot be removed by surgery. Akt inhibitor MK2206 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT01729923 Terminated - Clinical trials for Stage IVA Colon Cancer

A Trial of Maintenance ADAPT Therapy With Capecitabine and Celecoxib in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

ADAPT
Start date: March 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well capecitabine and celecoxib with or without radiation therapy works in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is newly diagnosed or has been previously treated with fluorouracil, and has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving capecitabine and celecoxib together with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT01383343 Completed - Clinical trials for Stage IVA Colon Cancer

Sorafenib Tosylate, Bevacizumab, Irinotecan Hydrochloride, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: August 2011
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of sorafenib tosylate when given together with bevacizumab, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Sorafenib tosylate and bevacizumab may also block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving sorafenib tosylate and bevacizumab together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for colorectal cancer.

NCT ID: NCT01254617 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Lenalidomide and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

ADCC
Start date: February 10, 2011
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of lenalidomide when given together with cetuximab in treating patients with colorectal cancer or head and neck cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving lenalidomide together with cetuximab may be a better treatment for colorectal cancer or head and neck cancer.

NCT ID: NCT01198535 Terminated - Clinical trials for Stage IVA Colon Cancer

Phase I Study of Cetuximab With RO4929097 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: September 2010
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine if a new drug, RO4929097, can work with cetuximab, a drug already approved for colorectal cancer, to help fight the patient's cancer. Cancers arise as a result of abnormal control of gene expression. One of the pathways that gets abnormally regulated in some cancers is the Notch pathway. RO4929097 is an investigational drug that blocks the activation of the Notch pathway. It is hoped that by blocking this abnormal activation, this drug may be helpful in patients with cancer but the investigators do not yet know if that is true. Cetuximab is an antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor and is known to have activity in metastatic colorectal cancer. Recent studies have shown that people with colorectal cancers that contain a mutation in a gene called K-ras do not benefit from receiving cetuximab. It is unknown if adding RO4929097 to cetuximab would benefit patients who have tumors with this mutation.

NCT ID: NCT01131234 Completed - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

Start date: May 2010
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I clinical trial is studying the side effects and best dose of giving gamma-secretase inhibitor RO4929097 and cediranib maleate together in treating patients with advanced solid tumors. Gamma-secretase inhibitor RO4929097 and cediranib maleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cediranib maleate also may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor.