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Recurrent Colon Cancer clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT02235324 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Recurrent Rectal Cancer

Ziv-Aflibercept Followed by Ziv-Aflibercept, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin Calcium in Treating Patients With Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

Start date: March 2015
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how long it takes colorectal cancer resistant to standard treatment to grow while receiving treatment with ziv-aflibercept, and how well adding fluorouracil and leucovorin calcium to ziv-aflibercept works in treating patients with stage IV colorectal cancer after they progress on ziv-aflibercept alone. Ziv-aflibercept may stop the growth of colorectal cancer by blocking the formation of tumor blood vessels. Fluorouracil and leucovorin calcium are drugs used in chemotherapy. Fluorouracil works to stop the growth of tumors cells by preventing the cells from growing and dividing. Leucovorin calcium helps fluorouracil work better. Adding fluorouracil and leucovorin calcium to ziv-aflibercept may be an effective treatment for patients who progress on ziv-aflibercept alone.

NCT ID: NCT02232152 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Rectal Cancer

CPI-613 and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Start date: December 2014
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CPI-613 when given together with fluorouracil in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and cannot be removed by surgery. CPI-613 may kill tumor cells by turning off their mitochondria. Mitochondria are used by tumor cells to produce energy and are the building blocks needed to make more tumor cells. By shutting off these mitochondria, CPI-613 deprives the tumor cells of energy and other supplies that they need to survive and grow in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CPI-613 with fluorouracil may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT02110953 Recruiting - Liver Metastases Clinical Trials

Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

Start date: January 2016
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of irinotecan-eluting beads in treating patients with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to the liver and does not respond to treatment with standard therapy. Irinotecan-eluting beads are tiny beads that have been loaded with irinotecan hydrochloride, a chemotherapy drug. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or stopping them from dividing. This treatment delivers the chemotherapy directly to the tumor area inside the liver instead of to the whole body as with systemic delivery of the drug. Irinotecan-eluting beads may work better that standard chemotherapy in treating patients with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to the liver.

NCT ID: NCT02041481 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Rectal Cancer

MEK Inhibitor MEK162 in Combination With Leucovorin Calcium, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: June 2014
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of MEK inhibitor MEK162 when given together with leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin in treating patients with advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. MEK inhibitor MEK162 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving MEK inhibitor MEK162 with leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin may kill more tumor cells.

NCT ID: NCT01987726 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Stage IV Breast Cancer

Comprehensive Gene Sequencing in Guiding Treatment Recommendations Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors

Start date: September 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This pilot clinical trial studies comprehensive gene sequencing in guiding treatment recommendations in patients with metastatic or recurrent solid tumors. Studying samples of blood and tissue from patients with cancer in the laboratory may improve the ability to plan treatment.

NCT ID: NCT01941173 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Recurrent Rectal Cancer

Short-Infusion Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

Start date: January 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This pilot clinical trial studies short-infusion ziv-aflibercept in treating patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving combination chemotherapy. Ziv-aflibercept may stop the growth of colorectal cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Giving the drug over a shorter infusion time may result in improved efficiency and patient satisfaction.

NCT ID: NCT01923337 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

Irinotecan and Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

Start date: August 2013
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alisertib when given together with irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with advanced solid tumors or colorectal cancer. Irinotecan hydrochloride and alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

NCT ID: NCT01846520 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment

Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, Urologic and Lung Cancers

Start date: October 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This randomized clinical trial studies the Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in supporting caregivers of patients with stage II-IV gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic and lung cancers. Education and telephone counseling may reduce stress and improve the well-being and quality of life of caregivers of cancer patients.

NCT ID: NCT01821105 Completed - Clinical trials for Recurrent Rectal Cancer

2 Phase Comparison of Pre-operative CT and PET Images for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Start date: March 2004
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This pilot phase II studies how well computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging works in detecting disease in patients undergoing surgery for metastatic colorectal cancer. Diagnostic procedures, such as CT and PET scans, done before and during surgery may help find colorectal cancer and help guide surgery

NCT ID: NCT01814501 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Rectal Cancer

Panitumumab and Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer After Prior Therapy With Bevacizumab

Start date: February 2013
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well panitumumab and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with metastatic colorectal cancer previously treated with combination chemotherapy and bevacizumab. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving panitumumab and combination chemotherapy together may kill more tumor cells