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Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma.

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NCT ID: NCT01780662 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

Brentuximab Vedotin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

Start date: January 31, 2013
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of brentuximab vedotin when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, may find cancer cells and help kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving brentuximab vedotin together with gemcitabine hydrochloride may kill more cancer cells.

NCT ID: NCT01008462 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Start date: March 18, 2010
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant followed by donor bone marrow transplant in treating patients with high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Autologous stem cell transplantation uses the patient's stem cells and does not cause graft versus host disease (GVHD) and has a very low risk of death, while minimizing the number of cancer cells. Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant uses stem cells from the patient or a donor and may be able to replace immune cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy. These donated stem cells may help destroy cancer cells. Bone marrow transplant known as a nonmyeloablative transplant uses stem cells from a haploidentical family donor. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant followed by donor bone marrow transplant may work better in treating patients with high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

NCT ID: NCT00105001 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

Start date: November 2004
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with or without sirolimus works in preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant for hematologic cancer. Giving low doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, and total-body-irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also stops the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune system and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving MMF and tacrolimus with or without sirolimus after transplant may stop this from happening.

NCT ID: NCT00005803 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

Start date: September 1999
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase I/II trial studies how well autologous stem cell transplant followed by donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with lymphoma that has returned or does not respond to treatment. Peripheral blood stem cell transplant using stem cells from the patient or a donor may be able to replace immune cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy used to kill cancer cells. The donated stem cells may also help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect).