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PTSD clinical trials

View clinical trials related to PTSD.

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NCT ID: NCT03916614 Not yet recruiting - PTSD Clinical Trials

Relief of Symptoms of Post-traumatic Stress for Victims of Gun Violence

Start date: June 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

To test the hypothesis that adult individuals who are victims of gun violence will have decreased symptoms of post-traumatic stress after an individual-level intervention with the Screening and Tool for Awareness and Relief of Trauma (START).

NCT ID: NCT03907995 Not yet recruiting - PTSD Clinical Trials

Peer-led Group Intervention for Coping With Disaster

Start date: May 13, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The present project partners with leading faith communities in Houston to provide expert-led educational workshops to a diverse sample of adults on normative and concerning response to disaster. Secondly implementing peer-led interventions where a trained adult leads others through an evidence-based manualized intervention. Lastly, identifying and referring individuals who require more intensive services to a higher level of care.

NCT ID: NCT03891797 Recruiting - PTSD Clinical Trials

PTSD Treatment for Incarcerated Men and Women

Start date: March 5, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

There is a particular need for more effective treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within the incarcerated population. The prevalence of trauma history and PTSD are markedly higher in jail and prison populations than in the general population, with estimates of current PTSD prevalence among prison inmates exceeding 20%, as opposed to 3-6% in the general population. Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) is a potentially promising PTSD treatment for the prison setting. The primary objectives of this project include: 1. Establish the feasibility of group CPT delivery in male and female prisons with PTSD by examining participant retention in the 12-week course; 2. Obtain preliminary efficacy estimates for reducing PTSD symptom severity, as well as secondary symptoms associated with trauma, including depression, hopelessness, self-blame, and negative self-related thoughts.

NCT ID: NCT03887312 Not yet recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Phone-Delivered Psychological Intervention (t-CETA) for Mental Health Problems in 8-16 Year-Old Syrian Refugee Children

t-CETA
Start date: April 1, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the effectiveness of t-CETA, a version of Common Elements Treatment Approach (CETA) adapted to be delivered over the telephone, in treating common mental health problems in 8-16 year old Syrian refugee children living in Lebanon. Children will be randomly assigned to receive either t-CETA or treatment as usual provided by Médecins du Monde, an NGO providing medical and mental health services to Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Symptoms of common mental health problems, including anxiety, depression, PTSD, and behavioural problems, and psychological well-being, will be measured before treatment, immediately after treatment, and three months after treatment is completed. Groups will be compared to determine if t-CETA is at least as effective as standard treatment provided by Médecins du Monde.

NCT ID: NCT03886753 Not yet recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Pharmacokinetic (PK) and Pharmacodynamics (PD) Study of Ilera Specific Products

Ilera
Start date: April 8, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This is an observational study of medical marijuana manufactured and dispensed by Ilera and given as standard treatment for a variety of approved serious medical conditions as defined by individual state law. All patients who are receiving one of the four formulations (Dream, Soothe, Shine and Ease) of medical marijuana will be provided a study flyer and asked to contact the study team via phone or email. Once the study team confirms eligibility, the study team will meet the subject face-to-face most likely at their dispensary (or other mutually agreeable location) and obtain informed consent, and assent when appropriate. Initial baseline demographic information, medical history and medication inventory will be completed. Also, since it is possible that the Investigators will enroll subjects across the region, Investigators anticipate the need to seek consent over the phone for many patients. This will be done via Skype, Go to Meeting, Facetime or similar platforms so that the Investigators can have a face to face interaction with the potential subjects. Regardless of where this discussion takes place (i.e., in person or via the web), all reasonable safeguards to ensure patient privacy will be taken. Patients or their legally authorized representative (LAR) will be given sufficient (i.e., up to several hours/days) to make a decision to participate in this study. Study staff will fax or email the consent form for their signature and no study procedures will begin until the signed consent form is received by the study team. The subjects or their LARs will be instructed on obtaining the blood samples. Blood draws will be completed in the subjects' home after one of their standard doses is taken.

NCT ID: NCT03868761 Not yet recruiting - Anxiety Clinical Trials

Feasibility and Efficacy of a Digital Mental Health Intervention for Teen Wildfire Survivors

Start date: April 1, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

In October, 2017, Northern California experienced devastating and historic wildfires. Sonoma Rises is an app designed for anyone who was impacted by this event and is intended to help survivors of disaster find their new normal. This study will assess the feasibility and efficacy of a self-help post-disaster mental health intervention delivered via a mobile app with a sample of teens who are experiencing post-disaster mental health symptoms.

NCT ID: NCT03862703 Not yet recruiting - PTSD Clinical Trials

PTSD Help - a Randomized Controlled Trial of a PTSD Mobile Health App

Start date: March 14, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Due to an increase in PTSD patients seeking treatment in the Danish mental health sector and the addition of Complex PTSD to the ICD-11, there is a need to increase the effectiveness of existing treatments for PTSD. mHealth interventions have been shown to be effective in reducing PTSD symptoms with small to moderate effect sizes. Therefore, the implementation of a mHealth intervention designed for psychiatric PTSD patients as a supplement to therapy may increase treatment outcome. As no studies to date has explored the effects of mHealth interventions in the Danish mental health sector the feasibility and effect of this type of intervention needs testing. The study's primary hypothesis is that PTSD patients in a Danish psychiatric outpatient setting will want to use a mHealth application as a supplement to care as usual (CAU). The secondary hypothesis is that PTSD patients will benefit from using a mHealth application as a supplement to CAU The study is an investigator-initiated randomized controlled feasibility trial investigating PTSD help combined with CAU compared to CAU for adults with PTSD. Eighty patients will be recruited and receive either the mHealth intervention combined with CAU or CAU alone. Primary outcome is the ratio of eligible patients that agree to participate in the study and the level of user compliance. Secondary outcome data consists of exploratory data on PTSD help on PTSD symptom severity, level of psychological distress, sleep quality, dissociation symptoms, therapy readiness, quality of life, disability levels, recovery and rumination. This study may help increase the investigator's knowledge of possible benefits of, as well as potential barriers to, the implementation of mHealth tools. It may also provide a cost-efficient means to increase therapy outcomes and decrease the duration of suffering for PTSD patients in the Danish psychiatric sector.

NCT ID: NCT03848858 Not yet recruiting - HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

Efficacy of EMDR Therapy, as Compared to Treatment as Usual, in Reducing Clinical Symptoms in People With HIV

Start date: March 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

People living with HIV may suffer HIV-related psychological trauma. Studies also show that this group is vulnerable to non-HIV-related trauma. Trauma can increase vulnerability to stress and reducing the ability to cope. It can have a negative impact on treatment adherence, treatment outcomes, functioning and health-related quality of life. However, despite evidence showing psychological trauma can contribute to poor outcomes in HIV, little research has been carried out to assess whether psychological trauma-focused therapy can help people living with HIV. A first-line treatment for psychological trauma is Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. This therapy is recommended by the World Health Organization for treating Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, with many studies showing this treatment is safe and effective for this disorder. However, it has not to our knowledge been specifically tested in the population of people living with HIV. This project will test whether EMDR therapy, in addition to the standard medical treatment received at the Infectious Diseases Unit, is more effective than standard medical treatment alone in reducing psychological trauma, improving health-related quality of life and improving HIV outcomes in people recently diagnosed with HIV. To test this, the investigators will recruit 40 people who have received a diagnosis of HIV within the last month. 20 will be offered the possibility to receive EMDR treatment for one hour weekly for up to 6 months, in addition to the standard medical treatment, while the other 20 will be offered only the standard medical treatment. The hypotheses of the present study are that the participants who receive EMDR therapy on top of their standard medical treatment will show a reduction in psychological trauma and related symptoms such as anxiety, depression and global distress, as compared to those who did not. The investigators also predict that the EMDR group will show improved functioning and health-related quality of life. The final hypotheses are that the EMDR group will show improved treatment adherence and HIV outcomes. If this study shows that a psychological trauma-focused therapy can help people adjust to a recent HIV diagnosis and have better outcomes, this will have important implications for improving care for people living with HIV.

NCT ID: NCT03846115 Not yet recruiting - Trauma Clinical Trials

A Mobile App for Peer-led Seeking Safety

Start date: July 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Peer support is historically prominent for substance use disorder (SUD), such as the world-wide model of Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-step groups. Yet for trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) there have been few attempts at peer help. A major challenge of trauma peer groups is that they usually focus on telling the story of members' trauma histories, which can be overly triggering and distressing. Seeking Safety offers an excellent choice for peer-led care. It is an evidence-based and is the most widely adopted model for SUD/PTD. It is present-focused, cognitive-behavioral, and provides psychoeducation and coping skills to help clients attain greater safety in their lives. It has been successfully implemented in peer-led format for many years and has been studied in various trials, including a recent randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing peer versus professional delivery, with positive results. In Phase 1 we developed a beta version of a mobile app for peer-led Seeking Safety (PLSS). In Phase 2 we will enhance the app features and content and also conduct an RCT in a sample of adults with current SUD/PTSD to compare the Peer Safety app condition to a control app.

NCT ID: NCT03842553 Completed - Trauma Clinical Trials

Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Among Rescuers at Risk

Start date: June 2014
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This cross-sectional, anonymous online survey aims to examine how salient variables influence PTSS, well-being, and suicidal ideation across the following professions of rescue workers: firefighters, ambulance personnel, police officers, and emergency and psychiatric nurses. PTSS, coping strategies, well-being, suicidal ideation, previously experienced and work-related trauma, and self-efficacy were measured and analyzed using multiple regression and structural equation modeling.