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Obesity clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Obesity.

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NCT ID: NCT03242564 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effects of Red Light LED Therapy on Body Contouring

Start date: July 10, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine whether red light therapy using LED 650nm red light for body contouring of the waist, hips and thighs is as effective as red light therapy using Laser 635nm red light.

NCT ID: NCT03241394 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Monocyte Subsets in Obese Patients With and Without Metabolic Syndrome

Start date: July 25, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue that induces insulin resistance and the appearance of metabolic syndrome (MS). The aim of the study was the investigation of whether circulating monocyte subsets are differentially regulated in MS.

NCT ID: NCT03241121 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Study of Eating Patterns With a Smartphone App and the Effects of Time Restricted Feeding in the Metabolic Syndrome

Start date: August 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

SwissChronoFood - Study of eating patterns with a smartphone app and the metabolic effects of time restricted feeding in metabolic syndrome The purpose of this study is to assess eating patterns among teenagers and adults with a new method, going beyond the pen-and-paper food diaries, and to investigate whether time restricted feeding leads to weight loss, improvement in lipid and glucose metabolism in individuals with metabolic syndrome

NCT ID: NCT03240419 Not yet recruiting - Inflammation Clinical Trials

Prenatal Probiotic Intervention

Start date: August 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study will assess the feasibility of a randomized control trial in which the effects of probiotic supplementation throughout pregnancy on maternal insulin sensitivity and inflammation, as well offspring gene expression and body composition are examined.

NCT ID: NCT03239782 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Glucose Metabolism Disorders

The "Metabolically-obese Normal-weight" Phenotype and Its Reversal by Calorie Restriction

Start date: March 29, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Singapore is approximately half of that in the United States, yet the incidence of type 2 diabetes is similar, and is expected to double in the near future. This indicates that metabolic dysfunction, particularly insulin resistance, is widely prevalent even among individuals who are considered normal-weight or lean by conventional measures, i.e. body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat. These individuals are often referred to as "metabolically-obese normal-weight" (MONW), and have increased risk for cardiometabolic disease despite their normal BMI and total body fat values. The prevalence of the MONW phenotype varies across populations and differs markedly among different ethnicities. However, our understanding of the complex interactions between ethnicity, body composition, and metabolic dysfunction and its reversal remains rudimentary. Previous attempts to characterize the MONW phenotype are confounded by the small but significant differences in BMI or percent body fat between groups (even if all subjects were lean, within the "normal" range), with MONW subjects being always "fatter" than the corresponding control subjects. There are no published studies that prospectively recruited groups of metabolically healthy and unhealthy lean individuals matched on BMI and percent body fat. Furthermore, although weight loss improves body composition and many of the cardiometabolic abnormalities in most obese patients, little is known about the possible therapeutic effects of calorie restriction in MONW subjects. Accordingly, a better understanding of the MONW phenotype and the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for its reversal will have important implications for public health. By facilitating earlier identification of these subjects, who are more likely to go undiagnosed and thus less likely to be treated before clinically overt cardiometabolic disease develops, results from this study will allow for earlier and effective intervention.

NCT ID: NCT03239717 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

SOAR: Can we Stop Obesity and Diabetes by Amino Acid Reduction?

SOAR
Start date: July 28, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are essential nutrients that the body obtains from proteins found in food, especially meat, diary products, and legumes. Data from rodent studies suggest that reduction of dietary BCAAs will promote fat mass loss and improved control of blood glucose. The purpose of this study is to test if reduction of dietary BCAAs without reducing calorie intake will lead to similar metabolic benefits in humans. Here the investigators test the feasibility of reducing dietary BCAAs using BCAA-free meal replacement beverages for two months.

NCT ID: NCT03238794 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Bariatric Surgery Versus Diet Alone in the Bile Acid Pathway and Weight Loss

Start date: September 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

It is unknown whether the bile acid pathway reacts differently to weight loss resulting from Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) surgery than weight loss resulting from caloric restriction alone.

NCT ID: NCT03236363 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effectiveness of MOVI Interventions on Adiposity, Cognition and Motor Competence: MOVI-da10!

MOVI-da10!
Start date: September 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Project which objective is to test the effectiveness of a classroom-based physical activity intervention (MOVI-da10!) on improving, body composition, cardio-respiratory fitness and executive function.

NCT ID: NCT03236337 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effectiveness of MOVI Interventions on Adiposity, Cognition and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: MOVI-daFit!

Start date: September 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Project which objective is to test the effectiveness of an extracurricular physical activity intervention based on high intensity interval training (MOVI-daFit!) on improving cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), cardiometabolic risk, executive function, and academic performance.

NCT ID: NCT03236285 Not yet recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Microvascular and Metabolic Effects of High-intensity Interval Exercise Training

HIIT-FAST
Start date: October 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study investigates the effects of high intensity interval training (HIIT) versus continuous training (CT), combined or not with fasting, on capillary density, microvascular function, cardiometabolic risk markers, functional capacity, and quality of life, in overweight or obese sedentary women with cardiometabolic risk factors. The use of HIIT could promote greater improvements in these parameters than CT. Furthermore, the positive effects of exercise may increase when it is performed in the fasting state, compared to exercise performed in the fed state.