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Leukemia, Lymphoid clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Leukemia, Lymphoid.

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NCT ID: NCT03804372 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia

The Incidence of Hepatitis B in Diffuse Large B‑Cell Lymphoma/Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia HBsAg-positive Treated With Rituximab, Chemotherapy and Tenofovir Alafenamide

CLL1818
Start date: March 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

In this study, we will evaluate the incidence of hepatitis B virus reactivation within the first 6 months of treatment with rituximab, standard chemotherapy and TAF in patients with diffuse Large B‑Cell Lymphoma/Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia HBsAg-positive.

NCT ID: NCT03803670 Completed - Clinical trials for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Clinical Significance of Occult Central Nervous System Disease In Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Start date: January 1, 2007
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Central nervous system involvement at diagnosis remains an obstacle to a long-term cure of patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We have previously reported that flow cytometry (FCM) is better than conventional cytology (CC) in demonstrating the presence of leukemic cells in the patients'(pts) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), especially in samples with low cell counts. In the framework of the national Campus ALL program aimed at improving the management of adult ALL patients in the context of the GIMEMA protocols, in the present study we retrospectively evaluated the incidence of occult CNS positivity and its impact on outcome in 241 adult pts with newly diagnosed ALL from 13 centers.

NCT ID: NCT03802695 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

A Phase 1 Study of Engineered Donor Grafts (OrcaGraft) in Recipients Undergoing Allogeneic Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

Start date: February 1, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of engineered donor grafts ("OrcaGraft") in participants undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

NCT ID: NCT03801525 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Ublituximab Plus Umbralisib in Combination With Venetoclax in Subjects With CLL

ULTRA-V
Start date: January 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Phase II study designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of ublituximab and umbralisib combined with venetoclax in subjects with previously treated CLL.

NCT ID: NCT03798509 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Human CD19 Targeted T Cells Injection Therapy for Relapsed and Refractory CD19-positive Leukemia

Start date: January 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

To evaluate the safety and tolerance of human CD19 targeted T Cells injection for the treatment of relapsed and refractory CD19-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Patients will be given a conditioning chemotherapy regimen of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide followed by a single infusion of CD19 CAR+ T cells.

NCT ID: NCT03792633 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Lymphoid Leukemia

Study of huCART19 for Very High-Risk (VHR) Subsets of Pediatric B-ALL

Start date: January 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This is a phase 2 study to evaluate humanized CD19 redirected autologous T cells (or huCART19 cells) with CD19 expressing relapsed and refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This study is targeting pediatric and young adult patients aged 1-29 years with CD19+ B cell malignancies in newly diagnosed B-ALL patients predicted to have an exceedingly poor outcome with conventional chemotherapy, in high-risk first relapse, or and in second or greater relapse in this phase 2 trial. In addition, a second cohort will test the efficacy of huCART19 in patients with poor response to prior B cell directed engineered cell therapy.

NCT ID: NCT03792256 Not yet recruiting - Acute Leukemia Clinical Trials

Palbociclib in Combination With Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (LL)

Start date: January 3, 2019
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

AINV18P1 is a Phase 1 study where palbociclib will be administrated in combination with a standard re-induction platform in pediatric relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL). LL patients are included because the patient population is rare and these patients are most commonly treated with ALL regimens. The proposed starting dose for this study will be 50 mg/m^2/day for 21 days.

NCT ID: NCT03788291 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Acalabrutinib and High Frequency Low Dose Subcutaneous Rituximab in Patients With Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia / Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

Start date: February 1, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The main purpose of this research study is to find out if the combination of acalabrutinib and high frequency low dose subcutaneous rituximab is safe and effective in patients who have previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL).

NCT ID: NCT03787264 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia

Sequential Regimen of Bendamustin-Debulking Followed by Obinutuzumab, Acalabrutinib and Venetoclax in Patients With Relapsed/Refractory CLL

CLL2-BAAG
Start date: January 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

CLL2-BAAG is a prospective, open-label, multicenter phase-II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a sequential regimen of debulking with bendamustine followed by induction and maintenance with GA101 (obinutuzumab), acalabrutinib (ACP-196) and venetoclax (ABT-199) in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL.

NCT ID: NCT03779854 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Naive T Cell Depletion for Preventing Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease in Children and Young Adults With Blood Cancers Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

Start date: February 14, 2019
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

This phase II trial studies how well naive T-cell depletion works in preventing chronic graft-versus-host disease in children and young adults with blood cancers undergoing donor stem cell transplant. This study is comparing naïve T-cell depletion transplantation to the traditional stem cell transplantation. In these transplants, chemotherapy and total-body radiotherapy ('conditioning') are used to kill residual leukemia cells and the patient's normal blood cells, especially immune cells that could reject the donor cells. Following the chemo/radiotherapy, blood stem cells from the donor are infused. These stem cells will grow and eventually replace the patient's original blood system, including red cells that carry oxygen to our tissues, platelets that stop bleeding from damaged vessels, and multiple types of immune-system white blood cells that fight infections. Mature donor immune cells, especially a type of immune cell called T lymphocytes (or T cells) are transferred along with these blood-forming stem cells. T cells are a major part of the curative power of transplantation because they can attack leukemia cells that have survived the chemo/radiation therapy and also help to fight infections after transplantation. However, donor T cells can also attack a patient's healthy tissues in an often-dangerous condition known as Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD). Drugs that suppress immune cells are used to decrease the severity of GVHD; however, they are incompletely effective and prolonged immunosuppression used to prevent and treat GVHD significantly increases the risk of serious infections. Removing all donor T cells from the transplant graft can prevent GVHD, but doing so also profoundly delays infection-fighting immune reconstitution and eliminates the possibility that donor immune cells will kill residual leukemia cells. Work in animal models found that depleting a type of T cell, called naïve T cells or T cells that have never responded to an infection, can diminish GVHD while at least in part preserving some of the benefits of donor T cells including resistance to infection and the ability to kill leukemia cells. This clinical trial studies how well the selective removal of naïve T cells works in preventing GVHD after peripheral blood stem cell transplants compared to the subjects that receive unmanipulated bone marrow transplants.