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Inflammation clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Inflammation.

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NCT ID: NCT03253705 Recruiting - Healthy Volunteers Clinical Trials

Samples From Human Subjects to Facilitate Basic, Translational and Clinical Research

Start date: August 23, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Background: This study is designed to provide samples to help us study the genes your blood cells are making as well as the proteins, sugars, fats, vitamins and other metabolites found in your blood or urine. Blood samples may also be collected to make special cells. These are called induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs. Pluripotent stem cells are cells that can be converted into any type of cell. Researchers want to study in the lab iPSCs that are derived from blood samples. Objective: To collect samples to help study genes, proteins, sugars, fats, vitamins, and other metabolites found in blood or urine. Eligibility: Healthy volunteers and patients ages 18 and older Design: First-time research study participants at NIH will have an initial visit for this study that should last no more than 1 hour. All other visits should last 20 30 minutes. Participants will undergo a limited history and physical exam. Participants may have routine blood and urine tests. If participants are giving a blood sample, they must have a hemoglobin level checked in the past 12 months to make sure it is safe for them to give a blood sample for research. Participants may have a venous blood collection. They may do this at several visits. They will lie on a recliner or couch or sit in a chair. A needle will be placed into a vein in the hand or arm, using sterile techniques. Blood will be withdrawn into multiple syringes or tubes. Participants may be asked to provide urine in an appropriate container

NCT ID: NCT03251560 Recruiting - Chronic Pelvic Pain Clinical Trials

The Clinical Effect of Fuke Qianjin Capsule on Chronic Pelvic Pain Caused by Pelvic Inflammation

Start date: December 1, 2016
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

A prospective random control clinical trials to research Fuke Qianjin capsule's effects on ameliorating the pain caused by chronic pelvic disease.

NCT ID: NCT03244592 Not yet recruiting - Inflammation Clinical Trials

Minocycline for Alcohol Use Disorder

Start date: January 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 1/Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The objective of this proposal is to advance medication development for alcohol use disorder by examining the efficacy and mechanisms of action of minocycline, a neuroimmune modulator, as a potential treatment. This study has important clinical implications, as the available treatments for alcohol use disorder are only modestly effective and testing novel medications is a high research priority.

NCT ID: NCT03244462 Not yet recruiting - Inflammation Clinical Trials

Food Effect, Oral & Intravenous Pharmacokinetics and Absolute Bioavailability of BAY1834845 Including Drug-drug Interaction With Methotrexate

Start date: August 17, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This study is planned to explore the effect of food on the oral pharmacokinetics, the intravenous pharmacokinetics and the absolute bioavailability of BAY1834845. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of BAY1834845 on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered methotrexate in healthy male subjects.

NCT ID: NCT03242395 Completed - Depression Clinical Trials

PRIME: Cognitive Outcome Following Major Burns

PRIME
Start date: October 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

PRIME aims to demonstrate through neurocognitive assessment that BICU patients will have a degree of neurocognitive dysfunction following a major burn, that this neurocognitive dysfunction is due to an underlying neuroinflammatory process by fMRI neuroimaging techniques, and that the neurocognitive deficit is associated with a reduced quality of life.

NCT ID: NCT03240497 Active, not recruiting - Inflammation Clinical Trials

Effects of Cold Exposure and Breathing Techniques on Immune Response

EXPOCOL
Start date: April 12, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Inflammatory cytokines play a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and innovative non-pharmacological therapies aimed at limiting cytokine production are highly warranted. Recently, our group showed that healthy volunteers trained in an intervention developed by 'Iceman' Wim Hof were able to voluntarily attenuate the pro-inflammatory response during experimental human endotoxemia (a model of systemic inflammation elicited by administration of lipopolysaccharide [LPS] in healthy volunteers). Subjects trained in the intervention exhibited profound increases in plasma adrenaline levels, a rapid increase of an anti-inflammatory cytokine and subsequent attenuation of the pro-inflammatory response. The intervention consists of three elements, namely meditation, exposure to cold and breathing techniques. The meditation element is not likely to be involved. It was a very minor part of the training program and was not practiced during the endotoxemia experiments. Exposure to cold and the subsequent rewarming to normal body temperature may influence the inflammatory response through the release of immunomodulatory molecules like HSP-70. Also, exposure to cold can induce an ischemia-reperfusion-like state in the skin and peripheral tissue that is known to be involved in the downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and upregulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The investigators anticipate that the third element, breathing techniques, is the major contributor to the anti-inflammatory effects of the intervention previously observed. The present study aims to explore the effects of the breathing technique ('strength ventilation'), the exposure to cold, and these two elements combined on the immune response during human endotoxemia. Elucidation of the relative contribution of the elements is of importance to establish a feasible, safe, and effective intervention for future use in patients. Objective: The primary objective of the present study is to determine the effects of the `strength ventilation` breathing technique and exposure to cold, both separately and in combination, on the inflammatory response during human endotoxemia. To this end, a 2 by 2 design will be employed. Additionally, an evaluation of the influence of the cold exposure and breathing technique on pain thresholds and oxygen tension in the mitochondria will take place.

NCT ID: NCT03240419 Not yet recruiting - Inflammation Clinical Trials

Prenatal Probiotic Intervention

Start date: August 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study will assess the feasibility of a randomized control trial in which the effects of probiotic supplementation throughout pregnancy on maternal insulin sensitivity and inflammation, as well offspring gene expression and body composition are examined.

NCT ID: NCT03237624 Not yet recruiting - Gingivitis Clinical Trials

Functional Chewing Gum in Reduction of Gingival Inflammation

Start date: October 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The aim of this prospective randomized 3-month double-blinded single center study is to determine whether a chewing gum device with food additive chitosan, will aid in reducing gingival inflammation by supplementing traditional tooth brushing and flossing measures. Patients with mild to moderate gingivitis will be identified and enrolled in this investigation. All enrolled subjects will receive baseline oral hygiene brushing instructions and a baseline clinical examination of the gingiva. The test group will utilize the test chewing gum three times a day for a minimum 20-30 minutes duration; the control group will receive a placebo gum and use it in a similar manner. We will examine whether daily use of a functional chewing gum enhances improvements to brushing and flossing.

NCT ID: NCT03237078 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Major Depressive Disorder

Lactobacillus Plantarum PS128 in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder and High Level of Inflammation

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Recent studies have suggested that gut-brain axis may be one of the mechanisms of major depression disorder (MDD). In animal studies, alteration of gut microbiota can affect animal's depression or anxiety-like behavior, brain neurochemistry and inflammation. In human studies, the composition of gut microbiota is different between patients with MDD and healthy controls. In addition, supplementation of probiotics can improve mood status in community and clinical participants. Inflammation is one of possible pathway to connect gut and brain. Gut permeability and inflammation level are higher in patients with MDD. Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 in one of bacteria extracted from traditional fermented food, Fu-Tsai. It can alleviate depressive-like behavior reduce inflammation level in maternal separation mice. This study is an 8-week open trial to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 on psychophysiology in patients with MDD and higher level of inflammation. This is a two-phase study. In the first phase, we will recruited patients fulfilling the following inclusion criteria: Age 20-65; fulfill Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth version (DSM-V) criteria of major depressive episode in recent 2 years; Psychotropics including antidepressants, antipsychotics and hypnotics have been kept unchanged for at least 3 months. The exclusion criteria are: comorbid with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or other substance use (except tobacco) disorder; having active suicidal or homicidal ideation; known allergy to probiotics; comorbid with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowl disease, liver cirrhosis, or autoimmune diseases; known active bacterial, fungal, or viral infections in one month; use of antibiotics, steroid, immunosuppressants, probiotics, or synbiotics in the month before collecting blood and fecal samples; pregnant or lactating women; who state to have dietary pattern changed or in diet within previous two months. Those hs-CRP > 3 mg/L in the first screen will be invited into the second phase intervention. In the second phase intervention, we will give eligible patients Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 for 8 weeks, and compare depression symptoms, gut microbiota, gut inflammation and permeability, and serum inflammation level before and after intervention.

NCT ID: NCT03233854 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Start date: August 1, 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

This phase I trial studies the side effects of CD19/CD22 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how well they work in treating patients with CD19 positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. A CAR is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells (T cells) can attack cancer cells by recognizing and responding to the CD19/CD22 proteins. These proteins are commonly found on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CD19/CD22-CAR T cells and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.