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Heart Failure With Normal Ejection Fraction clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03480633 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction

Biorepository Studying the Relationship Between Biomarkers and Heart Failure

PREFER-HF
Start date: April 7, 2016
Phase:
Study type: Observational [Patient Registry]

This study aims to prospectively evaluate the relationship between serial measurement of several biomarkers, such as insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), bone morphogenic protein 1 (BMP1), and carboxyterminal propeptide of type-I procollagen (PICP), and echocardiographic features of diastolic dysfunction in three groups, including patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), and patients without a history of heart failure (HF). The relationship between these novel biomarkers and one year major cardiovascular adverse events will also be evaluated.

NCT ID: NCT03465072 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Heart Failure With Normal Ejection Fraction

Abnormal Vascular, Metabolic, and Neural Function During Exercise in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

Start date: February 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for approximately half of the heart failure population in the United States. The primary chronic symptom in patients with HFpEF is severe exercise intolerance quantified as reduced peak oxygen uptake during whole body exercise (peak V̇O2). To date, studies have focused almost exclusively on central cardiac limitations of peak V̇O2 in HFpEF. However, in stark contrast to heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), drug therapies targeting central limitations have invariably failed to improve peak V̇O2, quality of life, or survival in HFpEF. Emerging evidence from our lab suggests reduced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity may contribute to exercise intolerance in HFpEF patients. However, the mechanisms responsible for peripheral metabolic inefficiency remain unclear. Reduced blood flow (oxygen delivery), and slowed oxygen uptake kinetics (O2 utilization) may both contribute to reduced peripheral oxidative capacity. Importantly, reduced oxidative capacity may result in increased production of metabolites known to activate muscle afferent nerves and stimulate reflex increases in muscle sympathetic (vasoconstrictor) nervous system activity (MSNA). However, to date there have been no studies specifically investigating the contribution of peripheral metabolic and neural impairments to reduced exercise capacity in HFpEF. The overall aim of this proposal will be 1) to identify impairments in peripheral vascular, metabolic, and sympathetic neural function and 2) to assess the ability of small muscle mass (knee extensor, KE) training, specifically targeting these peripheral skeletal muscle deficiencies, to improve aerobic capacity and exercise tolerance in HFpEF. GLOBAL HYPOTHESIS 1: HFpEF patients will demonstrate reduced skeletal muscle oxygen delivery, slowed oxygen uptake kinetics, and elevated resting and metaboreflex mediated MSNA. Hypothesis 1.1: The vasodilatory response to knee extensor exercise will be impaired in HFpEF patients. Specific Aim 1.1: To measure the immediate rapid onset vasodilatory response to muscle contraction, as well as the dynamic onset, and steady state vasodilatory responses to dynamic KE exercise. Hypothesis 1.2: Skeletal muscle oxygen uptake kinetics will be slowed in HFpEF. Specific Aim 1.2: To measure pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics during isolated KE exercise in order to isolate peripheral impairments in metabolic function independent of any central impairment. Hypothesis 1.3: HFpEF patients will demonstrate elevated MSNA at rest, and exaggerated metaboreflex sensitivity during exercise. Specific Aim 1.3: To test this hypothesis the investigators will measure MSNA from the peroneal nerve at rest, and during post exercise ischemia to directly assess metaboreflex sensitivity in HFpEF. GLOBAL HYPOTHESIS 2: Isolating peripheral adaptations to exercise training using single KE exercise training will improve peripheral vascular, metabolic, and neural function and result in greater functional capacity in HFpEF. Hypothesis 2.1: Isolated KE exercise training will improve the vasodilatory response to exercise, speed oxygen uptake kinetics, and reduce MSNA at rest HFpEF. Specific Aim 2.1: The assessments of vascular, metabolic, and neural function proposed in hypothesis 1 will be repeated after completing 8 weeks of single KE exercise training. Hypothesis 2.2: Single KE exercise training will improve whole body exercise tolerance, peak V̇O2, and functional capacity in HFpEF. Specific Aim 2.2: To test this hypothesis the investigators will measure maximal single KE work rate, V̇O2 kinetics and peak V̇O2 during cycle exercise, as well as distance covered in the six minute walk test.

NCT ID: NCT03387813 Recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

Hemodynamic-GUIDEd Management of Heart Failure

GUIDE-HF
Start date: March 15, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The GUIDE-HF IDE clinical trial is intended to demonstrate the effectiveness of the CardioMEMS™ HF System in an expanded patient population including heart failure (HF) patients outside of the present indication, but at risk for future HF events or mortality.

NCT ID: NCT03345446 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction

Circulating RNAs in Acute Congestive Heart Failure

CRUCiAL
Start date: August 17, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The purpose of this American Heart Association-funded and NIH-funded study is to examine circulating RNAs in the acute CHF setting, how they change with decongestive therapy, and their function in vitro and in vivo. The investigators are testing the hypothesis that ex-RNA levels change significantly during decongestion therapy and can be used as a marker of those individuals who respond to CHF therapy (in terms of cardiac structure or outcome). Additionally, the translational research design allows the investigators to assay the effects of these RNAs on tissue phenotypes in vitro.

NCT ID: NCT03327649 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Heart Failure With Normal Ejection Fraction

Neuromodulation to Treat Patients With Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

Start date: December 12, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a leading cause of mortality in the elderly. Outcomes of patients with HFpEF are poor and so far, no treatment has been shown to decrease morbidity or mortality. Recent animal and human studies suggest that a systemic proinflammatory state, produced by comorbidities, including aging, plays a central role in the development of HFpEF, supporting the notion that attenuating the proinflammatory state is an attractive therapeutic target for HFpEF. We have previously shown that low-level transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (tVNS) suppresses inflammation in patients with atrial fibrillation. The overall objective of this proposal is to examine the effects of tVNS on diastolic dysfunction, exercise capacity and inflammation in patients with HFpEF. Our specific aims include: 1. To examine the effect of intermittent (1 hour daily for 3 months) tVNS on diastolic dysfunction and exercise capacity, relative to sham stimulation, in patients with HFpEF and 2. To examine the effect of intermittent (1 hour daily for 3 months) LLTS on inflammatory cytokines relative to sham stimulation, in patients with HFpEF. The proposed proof-of-concept studies will provide the basis for the design of further human studies using LLTS among populations with HFpEF. In light of the increasing number of elderly patients with HFpEF and the poor success of the currently available treatment options, an alternative and novel approach such as tVNS has the potential to impact clinical practice and improve health outcomes among a large number of patients. It is anticipated that these investigations will contribute to the broader understanding of the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of HFpEF and how its inhibition can be used to provide therapeutic effects. Moreover, it is anticipated that a better understanding of how modulation of inflammation affects one of the hallmarks of HFpEF, diastolic dysfunction, will lead to the development of novel pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches to treat this disease.

NCT ID: NCT03317314 Recruiting - Heart Failure Clinical Trials

Cardiopulmonary Interactions in Patients With Heart Failure

Start date: July 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This study aims to evaluate cardiopulmonary interactions in patients with heat failure

NCT ID: NCT03310099 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Unsaturated Fatty Acids Enriched-diet to Improve Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Metabolic Flexibility and Glucose Tolerance in Obese Patients

Start date: October 23, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The investigators hypothesize that a dietary intervention aimed at increasing unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) consumption is feasible and has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, metabolic flexibility and glucose tolerance in symptomatic obese heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) patients.

NCT ID: NCT03289481 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Heart Failure With Normal Ejection Fraction

Treatment of HFpEF With Nitrate Supplement

Start date: March 20, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The objective of this project is to determine if Neo40, a nitric oxide generating lozenge, when consumed twice daily by subjects with HFpEF, will increase exercise tolerance, decrease symptoms and improve quality of life for patients.

NCT ID: NCT03269630 Recruiting - Healthy Clinical Trials

New Orleans Pulmonary Hypertension Biobank

NO-PH Biobank
Start date: December 29, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious condition characterized by a mean pulmonary artery pressure >=25mmHg on right heart catheterization (RHC). Despite advances in PH care, outcomes are still sub-optimal and further research is required into the pathobiology of the disease and development of biomarkers that can guide clinical care. The investigators are establishing a biobank to collect samples (blood, urine, stool) from patients with pulmonary hypertension, patients at high risk for pulmonary hypertension, healthy controls, and patients undergoing right heart catheterization. Specimens will be stored for future investigations.

NCT ID: NCT03251183 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Heart Failure With Normal Ejection Fraction

Validation of CMR Against Invasive Haemodynamics in Patients With HFpEF

DECIPHER-HFpEF
Start date: September 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Heart failure (HF) currently affects app. 2% of the western population and app. 10% of people >75 years. In about 50% of patients with symptomatic HF ejection fraction (EF) is preserved (HF-PEF). Once patients develop symptoms, the prognosis is poor with 25% mortality at 1 year and 50% mortality at 5 years. HFpEF is one of the major unresolved areas in clinical cardiology. The diagnosis of HFpEF remains a diagnosis of exclusion and currently no non-invasive measure provides a clear diagnosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides non invasive and radiation free evaluation of heart structure and function. New CMR parameters offer the possibility to describe the underlying pathological and physiological changes associated with HFpEF. The investigators propose to undertake the first systematic comparison between a CMR protocol and invasive haemodynamics as the best possible gold standard, as well as define the histopathological drivers in myocardial biopsies. The investigators will also examine the relations with tissue and serological biomarkers implicated in HFpEF and the role with standard and novel parameters by echocardiography. If successful, this study will provide tools for a reliable and accurate non-invasive characterization of patients with HFpEF, supporting the diagnosis and grading the severity of disease. This study will provide a reference basis for future diagnostic algorithms in HFpEF, both, for CMR and echocardiography, but also for their relative value in comparison to blood markers or invasive testing. In addition to a new pathway to acess the effects of current and novel therapeutic interventions, the investigators see the greatest potential in identifying a disease stage where the myocardial injury may be reversible.