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Glucose Metabolism Disorders clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Glucose Metabolism Disorders.

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NCT ID: NCT03577964 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Glucose Metabolism Disorders

Development of Pneumonia Due to Alveolar Glucose Levels in Systemic Hyperglycemia

Start date: September 1, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Incidence of Pneumonia in Patients with high systemic glucose levels.

NCT ID: NCT03566992 Recruiting - Critical Illness Clinical Trials

Effect of Location of Feeding on Glycemic Control in Critically Ill Patients (ELF)

ELF
Start date: May 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of location of feeding on glycemic control in critically ill patients. The investigators hypothesize that glycemic control in critically ill patients who receive enteral nutrition through postpyloric location (beyond stomach) will have better glycemic control compared to critically ill patients fed gastrically.

NCT ID: NCT03566511 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

Use of Functional MRI to Assess Functional Hypothalamic Activation in Response to Diazoxide

Start date: June 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this study is to determine whether metabolic control centers in the brain can be activated in patients with type 2 diabetes as compared to non-diabetic individuals. This is important since people with diabetes have inappropriately high production of glucose, which could be at least in part due to impaired activation of important brain centers.

NCT ID: NCT03550365 Completed - Inflammation Clinical Trials

Grain Fibre and Gut Health

FIBREFECTS
Start date: January 1, 2011
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Wholegrain fibre is known to affect on the gut health, but also may cause intestinal discomfort. Thus, many individuals may avoid the consumption of whole grain cereals in spite of their known health benefits, and may in this regard consume more restricted diets. In the preset study the aim was to technologically modify the cereal fibres to improve its usability and to maintain its health beneficial properties. The objective was to investigate intestinal fermentation of grain dietary fibre and associated effects on gut-mediated metabolic health, such as immunological health and adipose tissue function. The hypothesis was that whole grain products maintain their original beneficial health effects and may be better tolerable when the bran is technologically modified. Additionally, it was hypothesized that gut-mediated bioavailability of plant cell wall compounds and their metabolites affect the metabolic health through their immunomodulatory effects.

NCT ID: NCT03550105 Enrolling by invitation - Diabetes Mellitus Clinical Trials

Effects of Simulated Passive Jogging Device on Glucose Homeostasis, Muscle Strength and Endurance

Start date: June 30, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Physical Inactivity and excessive sedentary behavior are risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Movement is important for overall health. This study will assess the validity and usefulness of low risk, non-invasive wellness device, the Gentle Jogger® (GJ) that passively simulates the physical activities of jogging. The study will evaluate whether or not use of GJ modifies glycemic control and muscle strength in subjects who are known to be diabetic and those who are not. The study volunteers are subjects between the ages of 25-80yr.

NCT ID: NCT03540758 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Regulation of Endogenous Glucose Production by Central KATP Channels

Start date: June 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The goal of this study is to understand how activating control centers of the brain with diazoxide can affect how much glucose (sugar) is produced by the liver. This is particularly important for people with diabetes who have very high production of glucose, since this could be at least in part due to impaired regulation of the liver by the brain.

NCT ID: NCT03512496 Recruiting - Health Behavior Clinical Trials

Metabolic and Genetic Impacts of Energy Drinks in Youth

Start date: December 1, 2014
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Caffeine containing energy drinks (CCED) are beverages that typically contain mixtures of simple sugars, caffeine and may contain vitamin, mineral and/or herbal preparations. In Canada, the consumption of CCEDs among adolescents is a regular occurrence and a common part of the everyday diet. Contributing to the obesity epidemic in youth is the consumption of energy drinks; yet no data on the metabolic responses to CCEDs exists. This study will examine the metabolic implications of CCED consumption in adolescents, aged 13-19 years. The investigators hypothesize that CCEDs will impair glucose tolerance by ~30% in lean adolescents and the primary cause of the insulin resistance will be caffeine. Obese individuals will experience a similar level of glucose impairment, but a greater rise in blood glucose compared to their lean counterparts (i.e. higher starting glucose level). For many, this additional, caffeine-induced rise will expose them to hyperglycemia, putting some individuals in the glucose intolerant or transient diabetic range. It is hypothesized that continued metabolic insult resulting from CCEDs may predispose susceptible individuals to chronic metabolic diseases later in life. The investigators will also examine the genetic basis of caffeine-induced glucose intolerance. This gene-diet interaction could explain why caffeine may be much more metabolically harmful for some individuals compared to others. The study of 'metabolomics' will also be utilized to analyze caffeine and caffeine metabolites such as theobromine, theophylline, and xanthine. This will be accomplished using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Results from this study will have the potential to alter current perceptions that CCED are 'harmless' and will have far reaching implications for both medical professionals and legislators alike.

NCT ID: NCT03503747 Recruiting - Diabetes Mellitus Clinical Trials

Investigating Genetic Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

INGR1D
Start date: April 25, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The objective of this study is to determine the percentage of children with genetic markers putting them at increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, and to offer the opportunity for these children to be enrolled into a phase II b primary prevention trial.

NCT ID: NCT03486223 Recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibition and Insulin Resistance

Start date: May 17, 2018
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to test how soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibition with GSK2256294 affects tissue sEH activity and insulin sensitivity.

NCT ID: NCT03441919 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Diseases

Activation Innate Immune System in Type 1 Diabetes

Start date: January 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Hyperglycemia is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. It has also been shown that episodes of hyperglycemia increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases despite return to normoglycemia, a phenomenon termed 'glycemic or metabolic memory'. The molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. Cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction and stroke are caused by atherosclerosis, which is characterized by low grade inflammation of the vascular wall, including accumulation of innate immune cells such as monocytes and macrophages. The investigators hypothesize that chronic hyperglycemia shifts intracellular metabolism of innate immune cells towards glycolysis and changes the epigenetic state of (progenitors of) innate immune cells (monocytes and macrophages), which reprograms these cells towards a more aggressive, pro-atherogenic phenotype, thereby accelerating atherosclerosis. In this study, the investigators aim to test this hypothesis. This research will reveal whether the innate immune cells of patients with chronic hyperglycemia show a durable shift in intracellular metabolism and epigenetic changes and whether this associates with vascular inflammation.