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NCT ID: NCT03648411 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Asymptomatic Infections

Drug Resistance Among Asymptomatic Infection

Start date: January 12, 2019
Phase:
Study type: Observational

A cross-sectional study will be conducted in selected 2 sentinel sites for assessment of drug resistance falciparum and vivax among asymptomatic infection in migrant workers in Myanmar.

NCT ID: NCT03584035 Recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

Sensorimotor Integration Exercises on Post-stroke Balance and Fall Efficacy

SMIE
Start date: May 2, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

To study the effect of sensorimotor integration exercises on balance and fall efficacy in sub-acute stroke by performing 18 balance training exercises with three progressive steps.

NCT ID: NCT03579576 Recruiting - HIV Infections Clinical Trials

Simplified Antiviral Treatment Strategy for Hepatitis C in Myanmar

Start date: December 20, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The project will evaluate cost and treatment outcomes of a simplified hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing, treatment and care model integrated with HIV testing and treatment among key affected populations including people who inject drugs (PWID) in Myanmar.

NCT ID: NCT03578133 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Melioidosis Pneumonia

Causes of Pneumonia in Yangon

Start date: July 7, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This study will evaluate a new point of care diagnostic test for the diagnosis of melioidosis pneumonia in patients attending outpatient clinics in Yangon, Myanmar

NCT ID: NCT03511443 Recruiting - Malaria,Falciparum Clinical Trials

Evaluation of the Performance of a hsRDT Versus cRDT in Reactive Case Detection of Malaria Infections

Start date: October 2, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

A systematic review assessing the role, appropriateness and benefits of the active case detection strategy, both proactive and reactive, in low malaria transmission settings. A common indication is that more studies should be carried out to optimize the ACD strategy to the local context, or to provide evidence for the adoption of improved methods. One possible improved method is the use of more accurate diagnostic tools, such as the hsRDT proposed in this study, with an increased capacity to detect lower levels of parasitemia. It can provide a timely and relevant contribution for their development of national Standard Operating Procedures for a screening tool in the reactive case detection strategy.

NCT ID: NCT03483571 Recruiting - Malaria Clinical Trials

Dynamics of Subclinical Malaria: Preliminary Study

Start date: July 26, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This is a short longitudinal preliminary study that aims to describe the dynamics of low-density subclinical malaria to support the final study design of a subsequent matched cohort study. The primary objective is to assess the dynamics of subclinical malaria detected by ultrasensitive PCR over a short duration. The results will be used to guide the design of a matched cohort study of subclinical malaria in Myanmar and along its borders with China and Bangladesh

NCT ID: NCT03436810 Recruiting - Stroke Clinical Trials

Effect of Structured Progressive Task-Oriented Circuit Class Training With Motor Imagery on Gait in Stroke

Start date: January 11, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The objectives of the study will be General Objective is to investigate the effect of TOCCT with MI on gait performance in patients with stroke. Speific Objevtives. Specific Objectives are to compare the effect of TOCCT with MI and TOCCT with education on the spatio-temporal and functional gait variables in patients with stroke, to investigate the spatio-temporal and functional gait variables in patients with stroke after receiving TOCCT with MI and to investigate the spatio-temporal and functional gait variables in patients with stroke after receiving TOCCT with education.

NCT ID: NCT03269266 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for The Prevalence of Scrub Typhus

Scrub Typhus RDT Study

Start date: December 4, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Fever is one of most common presenting complaints in clinics in tropical countries. Rickettsial infections, enteric fever and leptospirosis are common and important causes of undifferentiated fever in Southeast Asia. Scrub typhus is caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi and humans are typically infected by a bite of an infected chigger (trombiculid mite larva). Clinical diagnosis is unreliable for identifying scrub typhus, unless a tick eschar is present which is almost pathognomonic for the disease in Southeast Asia. A combination of culture, paired serology and PCR has been proposed as the gold-standard method for detection. As a result laboratory confirmation is not widely available and the diagnosis is missed frequently in clinical practice. Some progress has been made in developing such a test and one promising candidate is the Scrub Typhus Detect IgM Rapid Test (InBios International Inc). We plan to use to this test in this study to estimate the prevalence of scrub typhus in selected febrile patients presenting to clinics in Myanmar . Patients will be followed up for one week to check for resolution of symptoms.

NCT ID: NCT03259269 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant

Expand New Drugs for TB [endTB]

Start date: February 9, 2016
Phase:
Study type: Observational

This observational study will examine the safety and efficacy of bedaquiline and delamanid used (individually, not together) in routine, multidrug regimens for treatment of MDR-TB. The information gathered in this study will inform doctors how best to use these TB drugs in the future.

NCT ID: NCT03224052 Completed - Sepsis Clinical Trials

Empirical ANtibiotic THErapy in Adults Hospitalised With Malaria

ANTHEM
Start date: May 1, 2016
Phase:
Study type: Observational

While World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend empirical antibacterial therapy as the standard of care in all African children with severe falciparum malaria, there are fewer data to guide the management of adults with the disease in low transmission settings. Presently WHO guidelines do not recommend empirical antibacterial therapy in adults with malaria in low transmission settings, instead antibacterial therapy is only clearly recommended in those patients in whom a serious bacterial co-infection is clinically suspected. However, in a pilot study in Myanmar (High Frequency of Clinically Significant Bacteremia in Adults Hospitalized With Falciparum Malaria PMID: 26989752) we found that 13% of adults hospitalized with falciparum malaria were bacteremic, with bacterial co-infection suspected by clinicians in the minority. Patients with serious bacterial infection are commonly not bacteraemic and so this probably underestimates the frequency of significant bacterial co-infection. In that pilot study, over 75% of patients received empirical antibacterial therapy on admission to hospital, which would not accord with published WHO guidelines as clinicians suspected bacterial co-infection in only 17%. However, the study's 100% survival rate - when over half of the patients were at high risk of death - suggests that the administration of antibacterial therapy may be appropriate until bacterial co-infection is excluded. There is also academic debate about the role of co-morbidities in the presentation of patients severely ill with vivax malaria. Bacterial co-infection has been reported in some - but by no means all - studies of severe vivax infection. It would be useful to determine the relative contribution of bacterial co-infection to the clinical presentation of patients with vivax malaria. By systematically seeking evidence of bacterial co-infection in all patients hospitalized at the study sites, this study aims to determine if the bacterial infection is really as prevalent as was the case in the pilot study. Accordingly it aims to determine the utility of a strategy that includes empirical antibacterial therapy in adults hospitalized with malaria in low transmission settings, until significant bactrila infection has been excluded.