Clinical Trials Logo

Filter by:
NCT ID: NCT03253367 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders

Phenomics and Genomics of Clozapine Pharmacotherapy

CLOZIN
Start date: January 19, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Clozapine (CLZ) is generally prescribed if at least two trials of antipsychotic agents have not led to satisfactory clinical improvement, thereby implying that patients on CLZ generally suffer from more severe and/or persistent symptoms than patients suffering from schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SCZ) on other antipsychotic agents. Unraveling the (functional) genetic variation underlying this severe SCZ phenotype therefore has the potential to deepen the understanding of the biological underpinnings of SCZ beyond the boundaries of DSM-based consensus criteria. Such knowledge in turn has the potential to shape future pharmacotherapeutic research. It is hypothesized that targeting this phenotype in genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing studies will signal genetic risk loci implicated in this severe SCZ phenotype. In the future, this may lead to early detection of severe SCZ, which in turn will enable tailoring of pharmacotherapeutic strategies to such SCZ subtypes. The results of this genetic part of the study will be combined with the results from our other research protocol 'Phenomics and genomic of clozapine pharmacotherapy - New Users'.The overarching goal of both projects is to create a prediction model for clozapine outcome (response (and side effects). This model includes genetic, epigenetic and clinical data.

NCT ID: NCT03251131 Not yet recruiting - Critical Illness Clinical Trials

REVERSE-AKI Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

REVERSE-AKI
Start date: September 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Observational studies among patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) have shown an association with fluid accumulation and increased mortality. Trials among other subgroups of critically ill patients have demonstrated that restricting fluid input after the initial resuscitation appears safe. The objective if this study is to determine whether a fluid restrictive treatment regimen will lead to a lower cumulative fluid balance at 72 hours from randomization in critically ill patients with AKI and whether this approach is safe and feasible.

NCT ID: NCT03250481 Recruiting - Critical Illness Clinical Trials

Responsiveness Index Versus the RASS Based Method for Adjusting Sedation in Critically Ill Patients

Start date: March 2013
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Systematic evaluation of pain, agitation and delirium in ICU-patients is recommended and deep sedation should be avoided. Sedation is still monitored with clinical assessments, like RASS. The Responsiveness Index (RI) is a recently described method for ICU sedation monitoring. It is based on processed frontal EMG and reflects the interaction between a patient's conscious state and the intensity and frequency of stimulations during treatment. RI has not been randomly compared to RASS to titrate sedation to target at a clinically adequate sedation state. In this open randomized controlled pilot study of 32 critically ill, mechanically ventilated adult patients, investigators will evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of RI based sedation compared to standard RASS based titration of sedation. Investigators hypothesize first that RI controlled sedation will be safe and, second that RI controlled sedation will associate with increased number of ventilator free days alive in 30 days without excess adverse events.

NCT ID: NCT03240523 Recruiting - Uterine Fibroids Clinical Trials

Assess Safety and Efficacy of Vilaprisan in Subjects With Uterine Fibroids Compare to Ulipristal

ASTEROID 5
Start date: July 31, 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The primary objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of vilaprisan in subjects with uterine fibroids compared to ulipristal The secondary objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of different treatment regimens of vilaprisan in subjects with uterine fibroids

NCT ID: NCT03238482 Not yet recruiting - Asthma Clinical Trials

Comparing Salmeterol/Fluticasone Easyhaler and Seretide Diskus (SAIMI)

Start date: August 2017
Phase: Phase 1
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to compare absorption of salmeterol and fluticasone from Salmeterol/fluticasone Easyhaler test products to the commercially available product Seretide Diskus

NCT ID: NCT03236961 Recruiting - Acute Appendicitis Clinical Trials

Optimizing the Antibiotic Treatment of Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis

APPACII
Start date: April 3, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Appendicectomy has been the treatment of acute appendicitis for over a hundred years. Appendicectomy, however, includes operative and postoperative risks despite being a routine procedure. Several studies have proved promising results of the safety and efficiency of antibiotics in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. The APPAC study by the investigators, published in 2015 in the Journal of American Medical Association, also proved promising results with 73% of patients with uncomplicated appendicitis treated successfully with antibiotics. None of the patients initially treated with antibiotics that later had appendectomy had major complications. The results of the APPAC trial suggest that CT proven uncomplicated acute appendicitis is not a surgical emergency and antibiotic therapy is a safe first-line treatment option. Reducing unnecessary appendectomies has also been shown to lead to significant economic savings. The aim of this randomized prospective study is to optimize antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated acute appendicitis by comparing different antibiotic regimens; intravenous antibiotic (ertapenem) followed by per oral antibiotic (levofloxacin and metronidazole) with only per oral antibiotics (moxifloxacin). Before randomization, the diagnosis of acute uncomplicated appendicitis is confirmed with a CT scan. The hypothesis is that broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics requiring additional hospital resources are not necessary for the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis and that per oral mono therapy is non-inferior to the combination of intravenous and per oral antibiotic therapy.

NCT ID: NCT03234296 Enrolling by invitation - Acute Appendicitis Clinical Trials

Antibiotics vs. Placebo in Acute Uncomplicated Appendicitis

APPACIII
Start date: August 9, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Appendicectomy has been the treatment of acute appendicitis for over a hundred years. Appendicectomy, however, includes operative and postoperative risks despite being a "routine" operation. At the same time other similar intra-abdominal infections, such as diverticulitis, are treated with antibiotics. Several studies have proved promising results of the safety and efficiency of antibiotics in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. Our previous APPAC study, published in 2015 in the Journal of American Medical Association, also proved promising results with 73% of patients with CT-diagnosed uncomplicated appendicitis treated successfully with antibiotics within one-year follow-up. None of the patients initially treated with antibiotics that later had appendectomy had major complications. The results of the APPAC trial suggest that CT proven uncomplicated acute appendicitis is not a surgical emergency and antibiotic therapy is a safe first-line treatment option. Reducing unnecessary appendectomies has also been shown to lead to significant economic savings. Already in 1886 Fitz noted that 1/3 of patients in a large series of autopsies from the pre-appendicectomy era had evidence of prior appendices inflammation suggesting spontaneous resolution of acute appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is thought to be similar to acute diverticulitis ("left-sided appendicitis") and this similarity has been shown in epidemiological studies. Recent studies have shown no benefit of antibiotic treatment in the treatment of uncomplicated diverticulitis with outpatient management without antibiotics proving safe and well-functioning. The aim of this randomised double-blinded study is to compare antibiotic therapy with placebo to evaluate the role of antibiotic therapy in the resolution of CT-diagnosed uncomplicated acute appendicitis. The hypothesis is that antibiotic therapy is necessary in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis and that antibiotic therapy is superior to spontaneous resolution (placebo) with the primary endpoint evaluated at ten days after the intervention.

NCT ID: NCT03232658 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

The Severity Of Individual Breathing Cessation Events In Diagnostics Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Start date: September 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common nocturnal breathing disorder characterized by complete (apnea) and partial (hypopnea) breathing cessations during sleep. Currently, clinical diagnosis of OSA is based on the clinical symptoms, especially excessive daytime sleepiness, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) providing a limited overview of the breathing cessation event frequency during the night. Longer obstruction events and deeper desaturations have been suggested to be more harmful than shorter and shallower events and these individual characteristics are completely neglected by conventional and currently used AHI. The investigators have previously introduced novel diagnostic parameters incorporating the number, duration and morphology of individual obstruction events and shown that they improve the severity estimation of OSA compared to traditional measures. Even though, the novel diagnostic parameters have so far tackled some of shortcomings of AHI, they need to be refined to further increase the accuracy of the OSA severity estimation. It has been shown that age, body mass index (BMI) and sleeping position are strongly related to the severity OSA. However, it is not thoroughly studied whether the severity of individual obstruction events progress over time (the aging process) and which factors affect to this progression. In addition, AHI has poor correlation with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) albeit both of them are used to estimate the severity of OSA. It is known that OSA patients with similar AHI values, durations of individual breathing cessation events can differ significantly. Longer and deeper events are connected to increased mortality rate in patients with moderate or severe OSA and thus, could be considered to be more detrimental than shorter and shallower ones. However, it has not been thoroughly investigated whether in severe OSA patients with identical AHI values, sleep efficiency or hypertension is related to the severity of individual breathing cessation events. The investigators planned to explore, whether the individual breathing cessation event severity progress over time and how different confounding factors affect this progression. Furthermore, the correlation of EDS with the individual breathing cessation event severity, sleep structure, and frequency and occurrence of cortical arousals will be investigated. Also, the investigators will explore whether the percentage time of disturbed breathing from total sleep time is related to sleep efficiency or hypertension in severe OSA patients having similar AHI. Moreover, Positional therapy (PT) i.e., the avoidance of the supine posture during sleep is the treatment of choice for Positional Patients (PP) having most of their breathing abnormalities while sleeping supine. Since it is known that apneas/hypopneas are more severe while sleeping supine, this time the investigators will assess the therapeutic value of PT for severe Non Positional patients (NPP).

NCT ID: NCT03231826 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Coronary Artery Disease

Arrhythmias in Post-Myocardial Infarction Patients

Start date: June 22, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Patients are screened for significant arrhythmias and other possibly significant ECG-patterns directly after discharge and two weeks after myocardial infarction using wearable devices. The home monitoring data will be linked with extensive data from electronic health records collected before, during hospital stay and after discharge. The purpose of the study is to clarify whether home monitoring of continuous ECG-signals can be used to predict and prevent serious adverse events after myocardial infarction.

NCT ID: NCT03225287 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH)

Extension Study of RA101495 for Patients With PNH Who Have Completed a RA101495 Clinical Study

Start date: July 17, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to enable continued access to RA101495 for patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) after they complete a RA101495 clinical study.