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Chronic Pain clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03588806 Recruiting - Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

Use of Xtampza ER to Overcome Difficulties in Swallowing Opioid Pills

Start date: May 1, 2018
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

This study will examine how the use of Xtampza ER, an opioid analgesic packaged in openable microsphere-containing capsules, affects swallowing satisfaction, pain, and physical and mental health outcomes in chronic pain patients.

NCT ID: NCT03584750 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Chronic Pain Syndrome

Floating for Chronic Pain

Float4Pain
Start date: June 12, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In recent years there has been a novel approach for the treatment of chronic pain: Floatation REST (restricted environmental stimulation therapy). Floating is a therapeutic approach, in which patients float in a specialized pool or tank on water that contains high concentrations of Epsom salt (Magnesium sulfate). Water is kept at skin temperature (35-36°C) and the pool or tank is shielded to provide almost complete darkness and silence. This therapeutic approach has proven to be effective in alleviating chronic pain. Due to the difficulties associated with designing a credible placebo control there have been no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with patients blinding so far. Such blinding, however, is crucial, to assess the true therapeutic effect of the intervention. The investigators will conduct the first patient blinded RCT of Floatation REST for chronic pain with a credible placebo control for floating and a no-treatment group.

NCT ID: NCT03582683 Recruiting - Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

A Community-Based Chronic Pain Self-Management Program in West Virginia

Start date: June 18, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Chronic pain (CP) affects 1 in 3 US adults and costs up to $635 billion annually in medical costs and lost work productivity. Use of opioid medications for CP has risen in the US, and opioid overdose deaths have quadrupled, yet with no overall change in pain. Although one-third of US adults have CP, there is a lack of affordable, non-pharmacological, evidence-based, community-delivered interventions for people with CP. One program, the Chronic Pain Self-Management Program (CPSMP), provides short-term improvements in pain but its long-term effects have not been evaluated. This study will examine the long-term effects of CPSMP in the medically underserved state of West Virginia (WV). The objectives of this community-engaged, randomized, wait-list controlled study are to: 1) determine the short- (26 weeks) and long-term (52 weeks) effectiveness of the 6-week CPSMP in adults with CP in WV; 2) evaluate the Reach (number of participants, completers), Effectiveness (outcomes), Adoption (number of sites, leaders, trainings), Implementation (fidelity), and Maintenance (satisfaction, continuation) of CPSMP using the RE-AIM Framework; and 3) disseminate the results to key stakeholders including evidence-based organizations, public health practitioners/researchers, and healthcare providers. The study will enroll 240 participants in 24 workshops at 12 community-based sites in 2 counties in WV, Greenbrier (rural) and Wood (urban). Participants will attend free, 2.5-hour weekly sessions for 6 weeks. Self-reported, performance-based, and physiological data will be collected at baseline and 26, and 52 weeks after the start of the intervention. The primary outcomes are pain (severity, quality, interference, medication use), mental health (mood, anxiety, catastrophizing), function (self-efficacy, coping, health-related quality of life, sleep, fatigue, communication, physical activity), healthcare utilization, missed work days, and gait speed.

NCT ID: NCT03581591 Recruiting - Pain, Chronic Clinical Trials

Open Label Trial Assessing Safety and Efficacy of Burosumab (KRN23), in a Patient With ENS and Hypophosphatemic Rickets

Start date: January 31, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

A 52 week, open label trial to assess the safety and efficacy of KRN23, an investigational antibody to FGF23, in a single pediatric patient with Epidermal Nevus Syndrome(ENS) and associated hypophosphatemic rickets

NCT ID: NCT03578237 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Lower Limb Amputation Below Knee

Cryoanalgesia to Prevent Acute and Chronic Pain Following Mastectomy and Limb Amputation: A Randomized, Double-Masked, Sham-Controlled Study

Start date: July 14, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The ultimate objective of the proposed line of research is to determine if cryoanalgesia is an effective adjunctive treatment for pain in the period immediately following mastectomy or limb amputation; and, if this analgesic modality decreases the risk of persistent postoperative pain, or "chronic" pain. The objective of the proposed pilot study is to optimize the protocol and collect data to power a subsequent, definitive clinical trial. Specific Aim 1: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia decreases the incidence and severity of post-mastectomy pain. Hypothesis 1a (primary): The severity of breast pain will be significantly decreased following mastectomy on postoperative day 2 with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1b: The incidence of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following mastectomy with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 1c: The severity of chronic pain will be significantly decreased one year following mastectomy with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving standard-of-care treatment. Specific Aim 2: To determine if, compared with current and customary analgesia, the addition of cryoanalgesia decreases the incidence and severity of post-amputation pain. Hypothesis 2a: The severity of operative limb pain will be significantly decreased in the week following a surgical limb amputation with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 2b: The incidence of chronic pain will be significantly decreased in the year following a surgical limb amputation with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving standard-of-care treatment. Hypothesis 2c: The severity of chronic pain will be significantly decreased in the year following a surgical limb amputation with the addition of cryoanalgesia as compared with patients receiving standard-of-care treatment.

NCT ID: NCT03576781 Recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Developing rTMS Treatment Strategies for Pain in Opiate Dependence

Start date: February 9, 2017
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to parametically evaluate two different types of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) treatment strategies as a potential treatment for pain in individuals currently taking prescription opiates. Repetitive TMS is a non-invasive tool that uses magnetic pulses to temporarily stimulate specific brain areas. This study will test whether rTMS over different locations of the prefrontal cortex can produce a reduction in an individuals perception of pain and how the brain responds to pain. Participants will be randomized to receive either sham-rTMS, or one of two real rTMS treatments. Brain imaging, behavioral assessments, and pain assessments will be collected both immediately before and after rTMS.

NCT ID: NCT03569865 Not yet recruiting - Osteoarthritis Clinical Trials

Audio-visual Stimulation: Sleep Dose Response

Start date: October 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Osteoarthritis (OA) pain affects 50 percent of older adults, more than half of whom also experience significant sleep disturbance. This study examines the impact of an innovative audiovisual stimulation (AVS) program on human brainwaves, and its usefulness to improve sleep. The AVS intervention, if demonstrated to be efficacious for sleep promotion, could benefit millions of people worldwide.

NCT ID: NCT03563911 Not yet recruiting - Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

Brief Mindfulness and Nutrition-Based Interventions for Opioid-Treated Chronic Pain: Strategies to Ease Pain

STEP
Start date: August 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This pilot randomized clinical trial (RCT) will randomize adults with opioid-treated chronic pain to one, 20-minute session of either: mindfulness training (BMBI) or nutrition education (Control). Following the session, participants will be encouraged to practice a technique associated with their intervention (i.e., practicing mindfulness technique in BMBI, preparing healthy meals in Control) 20 minutes/day for 4 consecutive weeks at home. Quantitative sensory testing (with cold pressor and algometer) will be conducted before and after the session, and self-reported outcome assessments will be conducted before and after the session and at 1-week and 4-week follow-ups.

NCT ID: NCT03563820 Recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Resilience and Well-Being Pilot Study

Start date: June 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

It is common for Veterans with injuries, illnesses, or physical disabilities to experience depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic pain, and other concerns. They may also have goals like becoming happier or better able to cope with challenges that life brings. The purpose of this research study is to learn whether Veterans like and benefit from a 5-week, group-based positive psychology program aimed at improving mental health, resilience, well-being, and quality of life. Participants will be asked to complete several assessments (surveys/interviews) over the course of the study that are not considered part of standard care. Additionally, participants will be asked to participate in a focus group at the end of the study to provide feedback about their experiences in the group.

NCT ID: NCT03561844 Recruiting - Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

Investigate the Efficacy and Effectiveness of Aromatherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain

Start date: November 29, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

In recent decades, following an increased longevity in Hong Kong, there is a drastic increase in the prevalence chronic conditions, including chronic pain, seems to be the main reasons of suffering for many older adults. This condition not only pose a burden to the whole family but also the healthcare system. While conventional treatment of chronic pain using pharmacotherapy and non-pharmacological treatments has been effective for managing symptoms, owing to the adverse side effects caused by anti-psychotic drugs and the short effective period incurred by non-pharmacological interventions, development of alternative and non-pharmacological approaches for the management of pain is of urgent need. Research has shown that aromatherapy (both administered through inhalation and therapeutic massage) has been effective in reducing showing pain-relieving effects. These findings support the premise that aromatherapy and the investigators hope to provide further evidence to support the use of aromatherapy as an evidence-based mainstream intervention for pain relief in older adults with chronic pain. Whilst there is sufficient evidence to support the effectiveness of aromatherapy, few studies compared the effectiveness of the use of aromatherapy by inhalation and/or therapeutic massage. The investigators aim to address the above research gaps on the clinical application of aromatherapy on chronic pain, with a focus on comparing the differential effectiveness between administration by inhalation and administration by therapeutic massage. The proposed research aims to (1) test the efficacy and effectiveness of aromatherapy on the symptom management of chronic pain in older adults; (2) compare the effects of aromatherapy-scent (i.e., inhalation) and aromatherapy-touch (i.e., therapeutic massage) in older adults with chronic pain. This study also explores the benefits of aromatherapy on cognitive functioning, functional performance and social engagement as secondary outcomes. A randomized, controlled, and single blinded trial is proposed. 120 older adults with chronic pain will be randomly assigned to aroma inhalation (intervention), aroma-touch or wait-list (control) treatments. Pain intensity and subjective changes in mood states (primary outcome), cognitive functioning, functional performance and social engagement (secondary outcome) will be assessed three times: pre-treatment, mid-treatment, post-treatment. If the study hypotheses are supported, the findings will provide empirical support for a treatment option that could improve manage the symptoms of patients diagnosed with chronic conditions, and also improve cognitive functioning, functional performance, and social engagement of older adults.