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NCT ID: NCT03737058 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Lay Health Worker Led Symptom Assessment Intervention

Start date: November 1, 2015
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Rising costs and poor patient experiences from under-treated symptoms have led to the demand for approaches that improve patients' experiences and lower expenditures. This observational project assigned a lay health worker to concuct proactive symptom assessments intended to achieve these goals among patients with advanced cancer.

NCT ID: NCT03692624 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Use of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) Biofeedback for Cancer Survivors

Start date: May 10, 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-B) is a complementary, non-pharmacologic therapy that is being tested to see if it can help cancer survivors reduce their symptoms of pain, stress, insomnia, fatigue, or depression. HRV-B is an interactive procedure in which participants relax and breathe regularly while watching the a computer screen. The computer screen provides feedback that helps people increase their heart rate variability.

NCT ID: NCT03676257 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Survival Endpoints for Treatment Evaluation in Subjects Treated for Metastatic Breast Cancer: Contribution of Real-life Databases

Start date: September 1, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Overall survival (OS) is considered the most reliable cancer endpoint and used by the Health Rregulatory authorities (HRA). OS presents multiple advantages in cancer randomized controlled trials (RCT): it is universally accepted as a measure of clinical benefit for the patient; it is objectively defined, both in terms of events and date of incidence; it is easily and precisely measured and thus reproducible; it can be exhaustively collected. As such, OS has been validated by HRAs. On the other hand, OS presents some limitations. Observing a benefit on OS may require a large number of patients and/or considerable time for patient follow-up. Costs for trials may be increased, and there might be delays in the introduction of possible beneficial treatments for patients. The development of alternative endpoints that could capture treatment benefit appropriately and be measurable earlier, is central for the evolution of clinical research in oncology. Real world data (RWD) are defined as other sources than clinical trials such as: electronic medical records, registries, insurance claims, pharmacy records, death certificates and other patient-generated data. This research is aimed at (i) describing the existing endpoints of survival in real-life setting, (ii) comparing the correlation at individual level with data to clinical trials for related to anti-HER2 targeted therapies and endocrine therapies in MBC. We will investigate the individual correlation between candidate surrogate endpoints and overall survival in a population-based record-computerized database centralizing data on about 20,000 patients from 2008 to 2017 in France. This work should lead to the estimation of various time-to event endpoints (e.g. OS, PFS, etc), in the real-life setting, for mBC patients. In addition, we will estimate their individual correlation with OS, which should help us highlight potential surrogate endpoints in this setting. We will focuss on three distinct population, accounting for a large population of mBS patients: : patients treated with anti-HER2 targeted agents, patients treated with endocrine therapies and elderly population.

NCT ID: NCT03676218 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Efficacy Endpoints to Assess Treatment Efficacy in Randomized Controlled Trials in Elderly Cancer Patients

Start date: September 1, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Context and hypothesis: In cancer randomized controlled trials (RCT), the validated and most objective criterion to assess treatment efficacy is overall survival (OS). In the elderly population, OS presents limitations as it can be affected by factors other than treatment such as comorbidity or severe toxicity. Although mortality reduction is important for patients of all ages, alternative outcomes such as the ability to live independently or with a better quality of life, may be more important for older patients. Reviews of RCT have highlighted (i) the heterogeneity of such alternative efficacy outcomes and (ii) an absence of standardized definitions for these endpoints. As a result, this may limit the quality of RCT as well as the comparison of results across trials. Our objective is to provide guidelines for standardized definitions of such alternative endpoints to assess treatment efficacy in cancer RCT in elderly populations. The development of guidelines will follow a formal consensus method (questionnaires + in-person meetings). A large panel of international experts will participate. Guidelines are awaited due to the heterogeneity of endpoints and absence of standardized definitions. Standardizing definitions will improve the quality and design of future trials and enhance comparison between trials.

NCT ID: NCT03676010 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer Trials (DATECAN-1)

DATECAN-1
Start date: September 2009
Phase:
Study type: Observational

In randomised phase III cancer clinical trials, the most objectively defined and only validated time-to-event endpoint is overall survival (OS). The appearance of new types of treatments and the multiplication of lines of treatment have resulted in the use of surrogate endpoints for overall survival such as progression-free survival (PFS), or time-to-treatment failure. Their development is strongly influenced by the necessity of reducing clinical trial duration, cost and number of patients. However, while these endpoints are frequently used, they are often poorly defined and definitions can differ between trials which may limit their use as primary endpoints. Moreover, this variability of definitions can impact on the trial's results by affecting estimation of treatments' effects. The aim of the Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials (DATECAN) project is to provide recommendations for standardised definitions of time-to-event endpoints in randomised cancer clinical trials. We will use a formal consensus methodology based on experts' opinions which will be obtained in a systematic manner. Definitions will be independently developed for several cancer sites, including pancreatic, breast, head and neck and colon cancer, as well as sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). The DATECAN project should lead to the elaboration of recommendations that can then be used as guidelines by researchers participating in clinical trials. This process should lead to a standardisation of the definitions of commonly used time-to-event endpoints, enabling appropriate comparisons of future trials' results.

NCT ID: NCT03644498 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Study to Determine if the Flu Vaccine Increases the Risk of Muscle Damage in Participants Taking Drugs That Block Certain Proteins Made by Some Types of Immune System Cells

Start date: May 2, 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

A retrospective, observational study conducted on cancer patients receiving a drug that blocks certain proteins made by some types of immune system cells

NCT ID: NCT03617237 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Registry Study to Evaluate the Clinical Outcome of Cancer Patients and Benign Diseases Treated With Radiation

Start date: July 3, 2012
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Registry database repository for determining clinical outcomes primarily of patients who have received or have been evaluated for radiation treatment in either the definitive or palliative setting for both malignant and benign etiologies. To compare the outcomes with National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of the American College of Surgeon(ACS).

NCT ID: NCT03520959 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Synovate Study for Synovial Sarcoma, Phase 3, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study For Subjects With Locally-advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma

Start date: September 18, 2018
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

To assess if the CMB305 vaccine regimen may help the body's immune system to slow or stop the growth of synovial sarcoma tumor and improve survival.

NCT ID: NCT03492073 Active, not recruiting - Cancer Clinical Trials

Effectiveness of an Individual Mindfulness-based Intervention for Cancer Patients in a Advanced Stage of the Disease and Their Relatives

Start date: November 14, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The importance of emotional regulation interventions in cancer patients and primary caregivers is clearly established, since it helps them manage their emotions. The aim of the study was to analyze the differential effect between two Emotional Support programs, one of them based on Mindfulness, and the other one Emotional Support as usual, on advanced cancer patients (stage III & IV) admitted to a Madrid Community Hospital La Paz and their relatives.

NCT ID: NCT03490747 Active, not recruiting - Obesity Clinical Trials

Evaluation of a Physical Activity Referral Scheme

Start date: March 12, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The study will evaluate the effectiveness of a co-developed exercise referral scheme. Participants will be recruited to one of three groups 1. Co-developed exercise referral scheme, 2. Usual care exercise referral scheme, 3. No treatment control (no intervention). The study will measure effectiveness by observing change in cardiorespiratory fitness at 12 weeks. Intervention cost-effectiveness will also be evaluated at 3 months follow-up using objective physical activity data.