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Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Clinical Trials

Browse current & upcoming clinical research / studies on Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH). There are a total of 18 clinical trials for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) in 4 countries with 3 trials currently in the United States. 4 are either active and/or recruiting patients or have not yet been completed. Click the title of each study to get the complete details on eligibility, location & other facts about the study.

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Definitions
Interventional trials
Determine whether experimental treatments or new ways of using known therapies are safe and effective under controlled environments.
Observational trials
Address health issues in large groups of people or populations in natural settings.
Recruiting
Participants are currently being recruited and enrolled.
Active, not recruiting
Study is ongoing (i.e., patients are being treated or examined), but enrollment has completed.
Not yet recruiting
Participants are not yet being recruited or enrolled.
Enrolling by invitation
Participants are being (or will be) selected from a predetermined population.
Completed
The study has concluded normally; participants are no longer being examined or treated (i.e., last patient's last visit has occurred).
Withdrawn
Study halted prematurely, prior to enrollment of first participant.
Suspended
Recruiting or enrolling participants has halted prematurely but potentially will resume.
Terminated
Recruiting or enrolling participants has halted prematurely and will not resume; participants are no longer being examined or treated.
April 2014 - June 2016
The aim of this study is to support the efficacy of Permixon 160 mg b.i.d. in treating subjects with symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), compared to placebo, using Tamsulosine LP 0.4 mg as a reference treatment.
Sponsor: Pierre Fabre Medicament
Study type: Interventional
January 2014 - January 2020
This is an open-labeled, non-randomized feasibility study to evaluate the safety of prostate artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).
Sponsor: Northwestern University
Study type: Interventional
July 2013 - March 2015
The HistoSonics' Histotripsy BPH Device, the Vortx Rx, is a portable ultrasound therapy device. The purpose of this study is to assess and monitor the performance of the Vortx Rx for initial safety and efficacy for the treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.
Sponsor: HistoSonics, Inc.
Study type: Interventional
June 2013 -
The HistoSonics' Histotripsy BPH Device, the Vortx Rx, is a portable ultrasound therapy device. The purpose of this study is to assess and monitor the performance of the Vortx Rx for initial safety and efficacy for the treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.
Sponsor: HistoSonics, Inc.
Study type: Interventional
June 2012 - October 2013
Inflammation is reported as one of the most recent hypotheses to explain BPH. Recent published works pointed out that urine and serum markers could be used for detection of prostatic inflammation. The aim of the study is to assess the activity on inflammation biomarkers (serum and urine inflammation markers) of Permixon® 160 mg hard capsule and Tamsulosine Arrow LP in the treatment of urinary symptoms related to BPH. The potential links between serum and urinary markers of inflammation and BPH clinical symptoms at baseline and on treatment will be explored.
Sponsor: Pierre Fabre Medicament
Study type: Interventional
January 2012 - February 2012
To compare the relative bioavailability and pharmacokinetic characteristics of a newly single pill combination of finasteride and tamsulosin with a conventional combination of finasteride and tamsulosin in healthy subjects with a single dose, randomized, open-label, 2-sequence -2period crossover study.
Sponsor: Korea University Anam Hospital
Study type: Interventional
December 2011 - December 2013
This is a Phase 4, prospective, open-label, randomized study of Greenlight XPS Laser versus BiVAP Saline Vaporization of the prostate in men with symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH). The study consists of a screening phase, treatment, followed by follow-up visits at 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months.
Sponsor: Brooklyn Urology Research Group
Study type: Interventional
September 2010 - May 2012
To evaluate efficacy of BL33 for mild and moderate benign prostatic hyperplasia(BPH).There are trials showing that electroacupuncture on BL33 for mild and moderate BPH is more effective than terazosin. It could reduce the International Prostate Syndrome Score (IPSS) by 6.68±2.84(39.79%),lower urinary symptoms bother of score(BS) and bladder residual urine, and increase maximum urinary flow rate.But the efficacy of BL33 has not been studied. The objective of this study is to evaluate efficacy of BL32 for mild and moderate BPH by comparison with non-acupoint group.
Sponsor: Guang'anmen Hospital of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences
Study type: Interventional
October 2009 - January 2011
The purpose of this study is to determine whether an experimental drug known as tadalafil given once daily can reduce the symptoms associated with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (straining, urinary frequency, feeling like your bladder is still full etc.)
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Study type: Interventional
September 2009 -
The injection of botulinum neurotoxin A into the prostate represents an alternative, minimal invasive treatment in patient with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of BTA in treating patients with symptomatic BPH and unsatisfactory response to combined medical therapy.
Sponsor: Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
Study type: Interventional
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