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Appetite clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03900130 Active, not recruiting - Behavior Clinical Trials

The Omnibus Satiety Metric: Predicting Satiety in Humans Through Brain, Blood, and Subjective Data

OmniSaM
Start date: October 18, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Designing food and drink that maximizes satiety has long been an ambition of industry and public health. For obvious reasons, foods that fill faster and for longer are desirable to consumers for controlling their weight, and to public health programs that are designed to prevent obesity. Current methods for measuring satiety have weak predictive value, commonly fail to replicate, and are yet to be validated with respect to energy consumption in everyday life. The investigators propose to overcome this deficiency by developing the Omnibus Satiety Metric (OmniSaM). OmniSaM is proposed as a multi-modal metric that targets the full spectrum of processes underlying the satiety cascade, composing brain, blood, mind and behavior of consumers. As a proof-of-concept, subjects (normal BMI) will undergo a preload ad libitum paradigm, with a 2-parameter factorial design comparing milk based products differing in levels of caloric load and protein-to-carbohydrate ratio. The investigators will acquire 1. high-resolution neuroimaging data, whilst 2. simultaneously recording appetitive hormones, 3. blood metabolite composition, 4. subjective sensory indices of appetite and 4. behavioral metrics of consumption.

NCT ID: NCT03866720 Recruiting - Appetite Clinical Trials

Isolating & Exploiting the Mechanisms That Link Breakfast to Human Health - Acute

Start date: February 26, 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Following the establishment of causal links between breakfast consumption, the individual components of energy balance, and health it is now important to examine and target the underlying biological mechanisms involved to maximise potential health benefits. To begin investigating the outlined mechanisms healthy, non-obese participants will be recruited to take part in phase I (acute crossover design) of a wider project.

NCT ID: NCT03701503 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Comparison of PYY, Ghrelin, GLP1, Glucose Level, Level of Satiety, and Ad Libitum Intake in Obese and Non-Obese Patients After Breakfast With Balanced Macronutrient Composition

Start date: October 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obesity can occur due to an imbalance of energy. This energy balance is greatly influenced by hunger and satiety. Obese person cannot resist hunger, while non obese can control hunger. Gut hormones, such as PYY and ghrelin, are associated with appetite and satiety control. This study's objective is to compare the effect of breakfast with balance composition on gut hormones, glucose and ad libitum intake four hours after breakfast between obese and non obese.. The research methodology was used a clinical trial with 18 obese women and 22 non obese women participants. Subjects were given a balance breakfast (protein 12,4%, carbohydrate 68,2%, fat 22,6%). Gut hormones (PYY, Ghrelin, GLP -1) level , Glucose level and satiety level were measured at 0, 15, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after breakfast. Ad libitum meal was given four hours after breakfast and measured after.

NCT ID: NCT03697486 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Effect of Breakfast With Different Macronutrient Composition on PYY, Ghrelin, GLP-1,Glucose Level, VAS for Hunger, VAS for Satiety and Ad Libitum Intake 4 Hours After Breakfast in Obese Women

Start date: October 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Gut hormones, such as PYY and ghrelin, are associated with appetite control and obesity. Protein is thought to be the most satieting nutrient and could affect production of several gut hormones. This study's objective is to find the effect of breakfast with different protein composition on PYY, ghrelin, and ad libitum intake four hours after breakfast. The research methodology was used a clinical trial with 22 obese women participants. Subjects were given three types of breakfast: low protein consumption (12.4% protein), medium protein (23.5% protein), and high protein (40,6% protein). PYY and ghrelin level were measured at 0, 15, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after breakfast. Ad libitum meal was given four hours after breakfast and measured after.

NCT ID: NCT03321227 Recruiting - Nutrition Clinical Trials

Effect of Eggs and Egg Components on Cognitive Performance and Appetite in School-aged Children

Start date: April 9, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of eggs and egg components on cognitive performance and appetite in children aged 9-14 years, as well as to identify the underlying physiological mechanisms in this relationship.

NCT ID: NCT03265392 Not yet recruiting - Appetite Clinical Trials

Impact of Food Combination on Starch Digestion and Gastric Processing

DECOUVRIR-M
Start date: January 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The results of our in vitro studies strengthen the hypothesis that the contribution of salivary alpha-amylase to starch digestion has been underrated and that this enzyme can play an important role in this process. As a result, its inhibition could constitute an opportunity to reduce the glycemic response elicited by starch-rich foods. The main goal of this study is to verify whether inhibition of salivary alpha-amylase, upon the consumption of starchy foods, can have an impact on the postprandial glycemic response, and/or satiety.

NCT ID: NCT03128684 Completed - Appetite Clinical Trials

The Effects of Lentil-containing Food Products on Satiety and Food Intake

Start date: May 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The Lentil Satiety study will examine the effects of replacing wheat and rice with two types of lentils within food products (muffins and chilies) on satiety and food intake in healthy adults.

NCT ID: NCT02957318 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effect of Potato Fiber on Appetite and Fecal Fat Excretion

POFIBA
Start date: September 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Results have indicated that some dietary fibers increase fecal fat excretion and particularly viscous fibers suppress appetite sensation and reduce energy intake. Both these effects may contribute to body weight management. Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate the potential of 3-weeks daily intake of potato pulp (FiberBind), rhamnogalacturonan I isolated potato fiber (RG-I) vs. a low-fiber control (placebo) on satiety and fecal fat excretion in healthy adults. Furthermore, a number of secondary endpoints are investigated.

NCT ID: NCT02793297 Completed - Appetite Clinical Trials

Effects of Sourdough Fermented Rye Crisp Bread on Appetite and Postprandial Metabolic Responses

Start date: January 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The overall objective is to evaluate the impact of sourdough fermented crisp bread on effects on appetite and postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Beneficial effects on appetite and postprandial insulin responses have been observed, particularly for unfermented rye crisp breads in a previous study. In the present study, the investigators evaluated how the intake of sourdough fermented rye crisp breads vs. unfermented rye crisp bread as well as a control refined wheat crisp bread product may affect self-rated appetite and postprandial insulin and glucose responses in healthy men and women in a meal-study. The investigators characterized intervention products with regards to microstructural and chemical features in order to elucidate underlying mechanisms for potential effects observed on appetite and postprandial metabolic responses.

NCT ID: NCT02666586 Completed - Appetite Clinical Trials

Effects of Faba Bean Fractions as Ingredients in Novel Food Products on Glycemia, Appetite and Metabolic Control

Start date: January 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

To describe the effect and mechanisms of action faba bean powder and fractions (protein, starch and fiber) on glucose and insulin homeostasis, food intake, satiety and metabolic regulation in young adults (18 to 30 years).