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Appetite clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03701503 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Comparison of PYY, Ghrelin, GLP1, Glucose Level, Level of Satiety, and Ad Libitum Intake in Obese and Non-Obese Patients After Breakfast With Balanced Macronutrient Composition

Start date: October 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Obesity can occur due to an imbalance of energy. This energy balance is greatly influenced by hunger and satiety. Obese person cannot resist hunger, while non obese can control hunger. Gut hormones, such as PYY and ghrelin, are associated with appetite and satiety control. This study's objective is to compare the effect of breakfast with balance composition on gut hormones, glucose and ad libitum intake four hours after breakfast between obese and non obese.. The research methodology was used a clinical trial with 18 obese women and 22 non obese women participants. Subjects were given a balance breakfast (protein 12,4%, carbohydrate 68,2%, fat 22,6%). Gut hormones (PYY, Ghrelin, GLP -1) level , Glucose level and satiety level were measured at 0, 15, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after breakfast. Ad libitum meal was given four hours after breakfast and measured after.

NCT ID: NCT03697486 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

The Effect of Breakfast With Different Macronutrient Composition on PYY, Ghrelin, GLP-1,Glucose Level, VAS for Hunger, VAS for Satiety and Ad Libitum Intake 4 Hours After Breakfast in Obese Women

Start date: October 2010
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Gut hormones, such as PYY and ghrelin, are associated with appetite control and obesity. Protein is thought to be the most satieting nutrient and could affect production of several gut hormones. This study's objective is to find the effect of breakfast with different protein composition on PYY, ghrelin, and ad libitum intake four hours after breakfast. The research methodology was used a clinical trial with 22 obese women participants. Subjects were given three types of breakfast: low protein consumption (12.4% protein), medium protein (23.5% protein), and high protein (40,6% protein). PYY and ghrelin level were measured at 0, 15, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after breakfast. Ad libitum meal was given four hours after breakfast and measured after.

NCT ID: NCT03321227 Recruiting - Nutrition Clinical Trials

Effect of Eggs and Egg Components on Cognitive Performance and Appetite in School-aged Children

Start date: April 9, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of eggs and egg components on cognitive performance and appetite in children aged 9-14 years, as well as to identify the underlying physiological mechanisms in this relationship.

NCT ID: NCT03265392 Not yet recruiting - Appetite Clinical Trials

Impact of Food Combination on Starch Digestion and Gastric Processing

DECOUVRIR-M
Start date: January 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The results of our in vitro studies strengthen the hypothesis that the contribution of salivary alpha-amylase to starch digestion has been underrated and that this enzyme can play an important role in this process. As a result, its inhibition could constitute an opportunity to reduce the glycemic response elicited by starch-rich foods. The main goal of this study is to verify whether inhibition of salivary alpha-amylase, upon the consumption of starchy foods, can have an impact on the postprandial glycemic response, and/or satiety.

NCT ID: NCT03128684 Not yet recruiting - Appetite Clinical Trials

The Effects of Lentil-containing Food Products on Satiety and Food Intake

Start date: May 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The Lentil Satiety study will examine the effects of replacing wheat, rice, and potato with two types of lentils within food products (muffins, chilies, and soups) on satiety and food intake in healthy adults.

NCT ID: NCT02957318 Completed - Obesity Clinical Trials

Effect of Potato Fiber on Appetite and Fecal Fat Excretion

POFIBA
Start date: September 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Results have indicated that some dietary fibers increase fecal fat excretion and particularly viscous fibers suppress appetite sensation and reduce energy intake. Both these effects may contribute to body weight management. Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate the potential of 3-weeks daily intake of potato pulp (FiberBind), rhamnogalacturonan I isolated potato fiber (RG-I) vs. a low-fiber control (placebo) on satiety and fecal fat excretion in healthy adults. Furthermore, a number of secondary endpoints are investigated.

NCT ID: NCT02793297 Completed - Appetite Clinical Trials

Effects of Sourdough Fermented Rye Crisp Bread on Appetite and Postprandial Metabolic Responses

Start date: January 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The overall objective is to evaluate the impact of sourdough fermented crisp bread on effects on appetite and postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Beneficial effects on appetite and postprandial insulin responses have been observed, particularly for unfermented rye crisp breads in a previous study. In the present study, the investigators evaluated how the intake of sourdough fermented rye crisp breads vs. unfermented rye crisp bread as well as a control refined wheat crisp bread product may affect self-rated appetite and postprandial insulin and glucose responses in healthy men and women in a meal-study. The investigators characterized intervention products with regards to microstructural and chemical features in order to elucidate underlying mechanisms for potential effects observed on appetite and postprandial metabolic responses.

NCT ID: NCT02666586 Completed - Appetite Clinical Trials

Effects of Faba Bean Fractions as Ingredients in Novel Food Products on Glycemia, Appetite and Metabolic Control

Start date: January 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

To describe the effect and mechanisms of action faba bean powder and fractions (protein, starch and fiber) on glucose and insulin homeostasis, food intake, satiety and metabolic regulation in young adults (18 to 30 years).

NCT ID: NCT02485743 Completed - Appetite Clinical Trials

A Trial Comparing a Diet Including Products Aimed at Targeting Satiety

SATIN
Start date: January 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This multi-centre, randomised controlled trial will be conducted over 24-weeks to evaluate the effect of a healthy diet supplemented with a product specifically developed (SATIN satiety products) to enhance feelings of satiety and reduce food intake after an initial weight loss period to assess weight maintenance. Participants will either receive the active SATIN product or a matched control product. The products contain ingredients which have been shown to positively affect satiety, satiation and/or body weight and are all accepted food ingredients approved for human consumption in Europe. They will be incorporated into different food matrices, e.g. drinks, shakes and cheeses. Corresponding control products without the active ingredients will be provided to participants allocated to the control group. The participants will be instructed in detail on how and when to consume the test products. Participants will be 300 adults (BMI >27kg/m2; Age>18years) who will be tested at three research sites (University of Liverpool, United Kingdom; University of Copenhagen, Denmark and University Rovira I Virgili, Spain). Recruitment will be divided between sites. Participants will attend assessments at one of the three research sites continually throughout the study period. The primary outcome will be weight maintenance after low calorie diet as assessed by weight, waist circumference, body composition (DXA), energy intake and subjective appetite assessments made at study test sessions. Secondary outcomes include assessing biomarkers of health outcomes (blood and urine indices), changes in physical activity as well as consumer benefits of the trial (assessed in a range of questionnaires) to determine diet efficacy.

NCT ID: NCT02484625 Completed - Appetite Clinical Trials

The Effect of Dairy and Non-dairy Snacks on Food Intake, Subjective Appetite in Children

Start date: November 2011
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Dairy products have a potential to be healthy snack foods for children and are provided in a variety of food matrices. For instance, milk represents a fluid product, yogurt can be classified as a semi-solid food, and finally cheese is the example of the solid food. This experiment is aimed to examine the effect of dairy products with different food matrices on satiety and food intake in children. Dairy products will be compared with other non-dairy snacks popular among children including cookies and potato chips.