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Anxiety Disorders clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Anxiety Disorders.

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NCT ID: NCT03628989 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Technology-Based Distractions During Minor Procedures

Start date: August 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine if non-invasive distracting devices (Virtual Reality headset, Augmented Reality Headset) are more effective than the standard of care (i.e., no technology-based distraction) for decreasing anxiety and pain scores in pediatric patients undergoing various minor procedures (i.e lumbar punctures and cardiac catheterization). The anticipated primary outcome will be a reduction of overall cumulative medication and secondary outcomes include but are not limited to: physician satisfaction, discharge time, pain scores, anxiety scores, and procedure time.

NCT ID: NCT03621371 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Cognitive-behavioral Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Primary Care

Start date: June 15, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The feasibilty and preliminary comparative effectiveness of two methods of cognitive-behavioral therapy - metacognitive therapy and intolerance of uncertainty therapy - for primary care patients with generalized anxiety disorder is investigated in a pilot study using a randomized controlled design. Purpose of the study is to examine the feasibility of a full-scale randomized controlled trial. Research questions primarily concern recruitment, measurement, and adherence.

NCT ID: NCT03613155 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

Assessment of Anxiety in Patients Treated by SMUR Toulouse and Receiving MEOPA as Part of Their Care

MEOPanx
Start date: September 2018
Phase:
Study type: Observational

The emergency setting, frequently associated with pain and the feeling of loss of control, can cause anxiety in patients. Reaction anxiety may be an appropriate response to an emergency; Nevertheless, attention must be paid to the evaluation and management of the latter especially as anxiety and pain are closely linked.

NCT ID: NCT03610542 Not yet recruiting - Anxiety Clinical Trials

School-based Interventions for Test Anxiety in Adolescents

Start date: September 2019
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study evaluates the clinical and cost effectiveness of face-to-face and computerised delivery of cognitive-behavioural therapy for highly anxious adolescents. Participants will be randomly allocated to face-to-face cognitive behavioural therapy, computerised delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy, or a no treatment control.

NCT ID: NCT03610503 Not yet recruiting - Pain Clinical Trials

The Effect of Preferred Music on EMG Anxiety and Pain

Start date: July 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Patients often report anxiety and pain related to electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS) which are tests used to look for diseases of the nerves and muscles. Unfortunately, for those with very high levels of test related stress, the experience may be very frightening and may impede completion of the study and negatively impact on making a timely and accurate diagnosis. Several studies have shown that music can improve anxiety and pain levels in various situations and procedures. Our study will allow participants to play music of their choice during EMG and NCS in order to determine if the pain and anxiety that they experience is reduced.

NCT ID: NCT03610373 Recruiting - Anxiety Disorders Clinical Trials

Testing Psychosocial Treatment Planning Methods for Youth Anxiety and Depression

Start date: October 4, 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Youth depression and anxiety represent a serious public health concern, with affected youth often experiencing social, familial, and academic impairment. Research evidence supports a growing array of effective treatments for youth depression and anxiety, yet as the collection of evidence-based treatments expands, so do the challenges of utilizing the evidence: clinicians must be able to (1) access, integrate, and apply the available evidence, and (2) engage in a collaborative process with each family to develop a plan that is responsive to each family's unique characteristics, preferences, and goals. Engaging caregivers and youths as active collaborators in the treatment planning process is a patient-centered approach with the potential to improve the process and outcome of youth mental health care by facilitating the personalization of established evidence-based treatment approaches. Such collaboration, frequently referred to as shared decision-making (SDM), is a hallmark of evidence-based practice and a key feature of federal guidelines for health care delivery. However, despite growing rhetorical support for SDM, empirical support is lacking, particularly in the area of youth mental health treatment. The absence of such research is unfortunate, given the potential for SDM to facilitate the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments, and to personalize the use of established treatments to increase acceptability, retention, satisfaction, and overall effectiveness. The present project tests the feasibility and acceptability of SDM through a pilot randomized controlled trial of 40 youths (ages 7-15) meeting diagnostic criteria for an anxiety or depressive disorder. The trial will compare an evidence-based treatment that is planned collaboratively with youths and caregivers using the SDM protocol, to an evidence-based treatment that is planned by the clinician and supervisor using pretreatment assessment data. Eligible youths will received up to 26 treatment sessions at no cost and complete assessments prior to the start of treatment, at the end of treatment, and six months following the end of treatment.

NCT ID: NCT03609450 Not yet recruiting - Depression Clinical Trials

Integrating Mindfulness Into the Patient-Centered Medical Home (Phase 3)

MINDFUL-PC-3
Start date: September 5, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This study compares the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness-based intervention (Mindfulness Training for Primary Care[MTPC]) vs. a low-dose mindfulness comparator on self-regulation targets, specifically the primary outcome of emotion regulation. Secondary outcomes include sustained attention/response inhibition and interoceptive awareness. A secondary analysis will investigate the extent to which these self-regulation targets mediate the impact of MTPC group on action plan initiation.

NCT ID: NCT03608449 Not yet recruiting - Anxiety Disorder Clinical Trials

Doing More With Less": Optimizing Psychotherapeutic Services in the Mental Health System

Start date: September 1, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Psychotherapy is one of the cornerstones of mental health services. It is provided by psychiatrist, psychologists and psychiatric social worker in both hospital and out-patient services, and is assumed to require massive manpower and training inputs. Internationally, the clinical outcomes of routine mental health services are rarely recorded or reported. However, a rough estimation is that half (40-60%) of all psychotherapies have a favorable clinical outcome. Recently (Clark et al, 2017), the English Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) Program, which delivers psychotherapies to more than 537 000 patients in the UK each year, indicated that 44% of the patients recovered, and 62%- improved. Consistent with a causal model, most organizational factors also predicted between-year changes in outcome, together accounting for 33% of variance in reliable improvement and 22% for reliable recovery. The proposed study aims at dramatically improving the yield of psychotherapies in the Mental Health Services by combining monitoring and patient-therapist matching strategies. The first will be achieved by implementing Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM), and the second- by applying a patient-therapist match-re-match procedure during psychotherapy

NCT ID: NCT03607708 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Depression Anxiety Disorder

Alternative Treatments To Prevent Cognitive Decline in Older Adults With Depression and Anxiety

Start date: September 10, 2018
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Major depression and anxiety disorders are leading causes of disability worldwide. These mental disorders deeply impact social functioning and physical health in more than 300,000-600,000 Canadians over the age of 60. Depressed and anxious older adults have a 2-3 times increased risk of developing dementia and cognitive decline. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group meditation intervention that has been beneficial in treating depression and anxiety in younger adults. Our research group has experience conducting clinical trials of MBCT in older adults with depression and anxiety. Meditation therapies may prevent cognitive decline, but no previous study has examined this with MBCT. In this 8-week clinical trial, Investigators are examining whether MBCT can strengthen the structural and functional integrity of brain networks and improve cognitive resilience in vulnerable depressed and anxious older adults. Investigators will also examine whether MBCT can improve depression, anxiety symptoms, disability, and quality of life in patients. Investigators will conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT), comparing Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT; n=15) versus a Health Enhancement Program (HEP; n=15) active control in 30 older patients (>60) with depression or anxiety. Participants will be blinded to the treatment hypothesis while investigators and raters will be additionally blinded to group assignment. Both MBCT and HEP will be taught in weekly sessions over 8 weeks in similar sized groups (4-10 participants). Investigators will measure the effect of these interventions on brain network function and structure using magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and 8-week timepoints. Investigators will also assess cognitive functioning and a range of clinical symptoms/quality of life measures at baseline, 8-week and 6-month follow-up. Investigators anticipate that this project will improve quality of life in depressed and anxious older adults by enhancing brain resilience, cognitive function, and general mental health. This project will provides essential pilot data for a longer-term definitive neuroimaging trial of MBCT to assess the potential of this intervention to prevent cognitive decline and dementia in older adults.

NCT ID: NCT03603873 Completed - Anxiety Clinical Trials

Preoperative Anxiety Level, Premedications and General Anaesthetic Proceedings

Start date: March 3, 2017
Phase:
Study type: Observational

Although it seems obvious that the high level of preoperative anxiety may affect intraoperative anaesthetic requirements and recovery adversely, there are several contradictory studies about this subject. Furthermore, the effects of anxiolytic premedication are actually disputed: sedative premedication is widely administered but little clinical evidence supports its use. We want to evaluate the effects of pre-procedure anxiety for propofol needs in patients receiving general anaesthetic procedure. We also want to know if premedication is useful according to the preoperative anxiety level, in order to determine if a sub-group of patients benefit from it.