Clinical Trials Logo

Amphetamine Dependence clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Amphetamine Dependence.

Filter by:

NCT ID: NCT02774954 Active, not recruiting - HIV Clinical Trials

Change the Cycle: An RCT to Prevent Injection Initiation

CTC
Start date: June 2016
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The study will test the efficacy of a hour long, one-on-one, active listening counseling session (called Change the Cycle or CTC) aimed at reducing behaviors among active people who inject drugs (PWID) that research has found to facilitate uptake of injection drug use among non-injectors. The study will involve ~1,100 PWID who will be randomized to CTC or an equal attention control intervention on improving nutrition. Participants will be recruited in Los Angeles and San Francisco, California and followed up at 6 and 12 months to determine changes in direct and indirect facilitation of injection initiation among non-injectors.

NCT ID: NCT02541526 Recruiting - Heroin Dependence Clinical Trials

Mirtazapine as a Treatment for Co-Occurring Opioid and ATS Dependence in Malaysia

Start date: May 2013
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate tolerability, acceptability and potential efficacy of 4 months of maintenance treatment with Mirtazapine as compared to placebo for patients with co-occurring amphetamine-type stimulant and opioid dependence (COATS) receiving buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) in Kota Bharu.

NCT ID: NCT02541513 Active, not recruiting - Heroin Dependence Clinical Trials

An Open-label Study of Oral Paliparidone for the Treatment of Patients With Co-occurring Opioid and ATS Dependence

Start date: May 2013
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The proposed study will evaluate the tolerability, acceptability and potential efficacy of paliparidone for the treatment of co-occurring opioid and amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) dependence. In the proposed clinical trial, all patients will first discontinue illicit opioid and ATS and be inducted onto buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) in the inpatient ward at the department of psychiatry before beginning to receive paliparidone. Tolerability and acceptability will be evaluated by assessing the rates of patient retention during treatment, patient satisfaction with treatment and adverse effects during treatment. The potential efficacy of paliparidone will be evaluated with regard to the primary outcome measure: reductions in illicit ATS use, based on urine toxicology testing and self-report. Secondary outcome measures include treatment retention, reduction in HIV risk behaviors and improvements in functional status.

NCT ID: NCT02541500 Recruiting - Heroin Dependence Clinical Trials

An Open Label Study of Oral Minocycline for the Treatment of Patients With Co-occurring Opioid and ATS Dependence

Start date: April 2013
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The proposed study will evaluate the tolerability, acceptability and potential efficacy of minocycline for the treatment of co-occurring opioid and amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) dependence. In the proposed clinical trial, all patients will first discontinue illicit opioid and ATS and be inducted onto buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) in the inpatient ward at the department of psychiatry before beginning to receive minocycline. Tolerability and acceptability will be evaluated by assessing the rates of patient retention during treatment, patient satisfaction with treatment and adverse effects during treatment. The potential efficacy of minocycline will be evaluated with regard to the primary outcome measure: reductions in ATS use , based on urine toxicology testing and self-report. Secondary outcome measures include retention, reduction in HIV risk behaviors and improvements in functional status.

NCT ID: NCT01273701 Not yet recruiting - Clinical trials for Methamphetamine Dependence

Combination of Psychosocial Intervention and Slow Prosecutions for the Treatment of Methamphetamine Abuse/Dependence

Start date: January 2011
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The hospital where this study will be conducted is responsible for the one-year contingency management treatment for methamphetamine drug offenders referred from the Yunlin District Prosecutors Office. Completing the one-year treatment is prerequisite for offenders to get slow prosecutions. It is an open-label, parallel-group trial comparing the combination of psychosocial intervention and slow prosecutions with psychosocial intervention alone in treating subjects with methamphetamine dependence Study Hypothesis 1. Psychosocial interventions in combination with slow prosecutions is more effective than psychosocial interventions alone to achieve abstinence for subjects with methamphetamine abuse/dependance. 2. Inclusion of telephone reminding before each visit will enhance the retention rate and abstinence rate.

NCT ID: NCT01100853 Completed - Clinical trials for Amphetamine Dependence

Extended Release Naltrexone for Treating Amphetamine Dependence in Iceland

Start date: May 2010
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

Until positive results were found with oral naltrexone, no medication has been effective against amphetamine dependence. The primary aim of this pilot study is to replicate the findings of the Swedish team that showed oral Naltrexone prevented relapse to amphetamine addiction and to extend their results by randomizing treatment-seeking amphetamine addicted patients to a 6 month course of VIVITROL (naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension) or VIVITROL placebo. Patients in each group will receive drug counseling. VIVITROL is administered monthly and may be a better test of efficacy than tablets that must be taken daily.

NCT ID: NCT00833443 Completed - Substance Abuse Clinical Trials

Study of Medical Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

BUP PGx
Start date: January 2009
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Currently there are no medications approved for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction. Bupropion is an antidepressant that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of depression and for cigarette smoking cessation but is not approved by the FDA for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction. Preliminary research studies suggest that bupropion may help people receiving treatment for methamphetamine addiction to reduce or to stop their methamphetamine use. But results of these studies also suggest that bupropion may help certain groups of patients more than others, such as men versus women and light versus heavy methamphetamine users, although the reasons for this difference are not known. One possibility is that a person's genetic make up may influence whether or not they respond to treatment with bupropion for methamphetamine addiction. The purpose of the study is to determine if bupropion is can help people reduce or stop their methamphetamine use and to investigate whether genetic variations influence whether people respond to treatment with bupropion for methamphetamine addiction, which may help doctors and patients better decide if treatment with bupropion will be beneficial or not. To identify possible genetic variations that influence response to bupropion, we will perform genetic tests on blood or saliva specimens from participants receiving treatment with either bupropion or placebo (which is a pill that contains no medication) in conjunction with standard cognitive behavioral therapy drug counseling. We will compare methamphetamine use, as assessed with urine drug screens, among participants receiving bupropion versus those receiving placebo to determine if bupropion helps people to reduce or stop their methamphetamine use. We will then compare the results of the genetic tests among participants who respond and who do not respond to bupropion. In addition, since the amount of methamphetamine a person uses was associated with response to bupropion in preliminary studies, we will also compare the results of genetic testing among persons with heavy versus light methamphetamine use before entering treatment. Results of this study have the potential to provide insights into the biology of methamphetamine addiction and help increase the understanding of how bupropion works. This information could be useful to develop effective medications for methamphetamine addiction and to improve the ability of clinicians to provide treatment to patients with methamphetamine addiction.

NCT ID: NCT00630097 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Substance Dependence

A Dose Ranging Study of Modafinil for Methamphetamine Dependence

Start date: December 2009
Phase: Phase 2
Study type: Interventional

Patients treated for methamphetamine dependence have high rates of relapse, and no pharmacotherapy has yet been demonstrated to be efficacious. Modafinil (d, l-2-[(diphenylmethyl)sulfinyl]acetamide) is a novel wake- and vigilance-promoting agent that is chemically and pharmacologically dissimilar to CNS stimulants. It is well tolerated and has low abuse liability compared to CNS stimulants. Modafinil is FDA approved for a variety of sleep disorders, may relieve methamphetamine withdrawal symptoms, improves cognitive function, has been shown to reduce cocaine use in dependent users, and is safe when coadministered with intravenous methamphetamine. We will conduct a randomized dose ranging clinical trial of modafinil to establish its safety and efficacy as a pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine dependence.

NCT ID: NCT00600145 Withdrawn - Clinical trials for Amphetamine Dependence

Dose Response of Mirtazapine to Methamphetamine Induced Interest, Mood Elevation and Reward

Start date: September 2007
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The primary purpose of this study is to determine if Mirtazapine will produce a decrease in interest in the drug, a decrease in mood elevation, and/or a decrease in reward when given before methamphetamine compared to placebo. Participants will be screened with a psychiatric interview, medical history and physical, laboratory tests, drug of abuse screen and, if female, a urine pregnancy test. They will be provided written informed consent. They will be studied in a within-subjects examination of the subjective mood responses of mirtazapine and methamphetamine. Interactions between methamphetamine and mirtazapine will be assessed by pharmacokinetic studies. Each participant will be introduced to rating scales and cognitive tasks described below. Participants will remain in the research unit for 5 hours on each day that they receive study medication or placebo. They will spend five days in total on the research unit, one day separated by at least one day; then in two day blocks separated by at least one day from another two day block. A venous catheter will be placed for blood draws. Blood pressures and heart rates will be recorded and assessed. Participants will be randomized and double blinded to receive either placebo or mirtazapine orally two hours prior to the administration of randomized and double blinded methamphetamine or placebo in order to have the peak effects of the drugs overlap. VAS-mood, ARCI, GRS, POMS and POMS-E, neurocognitive tasks Trails A and B and Symbol digits modalities test will be administered prior to the mirtazapine or placebo dose, and repeated after the administration of methamphetamine or placebo. After the administration of methamphetamine or placebo, vital signs will be assessed every 15 minutes and the measures will be repeated until 120 minutes have passed from the initial dose of methamphetamine or placebo. Blood will be drawn at one, three and four hour marks for pharmacokinetic testing. This will be repeated on each testing day.

NCT ID: NCT00377299 Completed - Clinical trials for Major Depressive Disorder

A Pilot Study of Citicoline add-on Therapy in Patients With Bipolar Disorder or Major Depressive Disorder and Amphetamine Abuse or Dependence

Start date: October 2006
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and severe psychiatric illness. Drug and alcohol abuse are very common in people with BD and other mood disorders and are associated with increased rates of hospitalization, violence towards self and others, medication non-adherence and cognitive impairment. However, few studies have investigated the treatment of dual-diagnosis patients as substance use is frequently an exclusion criterion in clinical trials of patients with BD. To address this need, we have developed a research program that explores the pharmacotherapy of people with BD and substance related-disorders. A potentially very interesting treatment for BD is citicoline. Some data suggest that this supplement may stabilize mood, decrease drug use and craving, and improve memory. We found promising results with citicoline in patients with BD and cocaine dependence. In recent years the use of amphetamine and methamphetamine has become an important public health concern. However, virtually no research has been conducted on the treatment of amphetamine abuse. We propose a double-blind placebo controlled prospective trial of citicoline in a group of 60 depressed outpatients with bipolar disorder, depressed phase or major depressive disorder and amphetamine abuse/dependence, to explore the safety and tolerability of citicoline, and its efficacy for mood symptoms, stimulant use and craving and its impact on cognition. Our goal is to determine which symptoms (e.g. mood, cognition, substance use) citicoline appears to be most effective and estimate effect sizes for future work.