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Clinical Trial Summary

The motivational-cognitive psychotherapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) will be used to treat amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) addiction.


Clinical Trial Description

The Glutamate and GABA deficits in prefrontal-striatal circuits play a vital role in ATS addiction and relapse, and proposed motivational-cognitive psychotherapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as two novel interventions. Focused on evaluating Glutamate/GABA functions in prefrontal-striatal circuits, neuropsychological tests, biochemical tests, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and functional MRI will be used to investigate the neurobiological mechanism of ATS addiction and relapse. These methods will also be used to evaluate the efficacy of the two novel intervention and investigate the mechanisms. The study will be very helpful to develop novel interventions in clinical practice and decrease ATS-related harm for both the patients and their families. ;


Study Design


Related Conditions & MeSH terms


NCT number NCT02713815
Study type Interventional
Source Shanghai Mental Health Center
Contact Zhao Min, PhD
Phone 021-54252689
Email 18017311005@163.com
Status Recruiting
Phase N/A
Start date July 2016
Completion date December 2019

See also
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