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Achilles Tendinopathy clinical trials

View clinical trials related to Achilles Tendinopathy.

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NCT ID: NCT03167554 Recruiting - Ultrasonography Clinical Trials

Ultrasound Guided Therapeutic Percutaneous Electrolysis in Achilles Tendinopathy.

Start date: May 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Achilles tendon is a frequent lower-limb tissue where tendinopathy may arise. Percutaneous Therapeutic Electrolysis (EPTE®) is an electronic device that enables to treat accurately, guided by an ultrasound, the tendon injured area by applying a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. Thus, the first stage of physiological regenerative process may be obtained. Design: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. Objectives: To know the effectiveness of Percutaneous Therapeutic Electrolysis (EPTE®) versus a sham intervention at improving pain and function in patients who undergo Achilles Chronic Tendinopathy and to determine the efficiency of Percutaneous Therapeutic Electrolysis (EPTE®) with monopolar needle versus Percutaneous Therapeutic Electrolysis (EPTE®) with bipolar needle at improving pain and function in patients who undergo Achilles Chronic Tendinopathy. Participants: patients diagnosed with Achilles Chronic Tendinopathy. Setting. Infanta Leonor Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Experimental intervention: Percutaneous Therapeutic Electrolysis (EPTE®) with monopolar needle, 330 microamps, 1 min 20 sec versus bipolar needle. Sham intervention: the guide tube of the needle contacted with the skin and the device remained switched on to simulate its functioning.

NCT ID: NCT03067545 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Do Simple Running Technique Changes Reduce Pain and Change Injury Causing Mechanics

Start date: March 22, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

This project aims to investigate whether an increase in step rate can be used to reduce pain and injury causing movement patterns in runners who are currently experiencing achilles tendonopathy, iliotibial band syndrome, patellofemoral pain syndrome and medial tibial stress syndrome. Many injuries have been reported to share similar injury causing movement patterns. For example iliotibial band syndrome and patellofemoral pain syndrome have been reported to be caused by increased side to side drop of the pelvis and inward movement of the hip. Gait retraining is a method of changing the way people run in order to change movement patterns.Increasing step rate may present a gait retraining method that does not pose further injury risks and can be used across multiple different injury populations. Studies have shown increasing step rate can reduce frontal plane movement patterns at the pelvis, hip and foot as well as reducing sagittal plane joint angles such as ankle dorsiflexion. Based on the changes in movement patterns increasing step rate has been recommended as an intervention for the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome and achilles tendonopathy. Therefore this study aims to investigate whether an increase in step rate can reduce pain and change injury causing mechanics in runners currently running with patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome or achilles tendinopathy. The aim of the project is to use a simple gait intervention, increasing step rate to investigate if this technique change can reduce pain immediately, at short term follow up and long term follow up. The project will also look at whether an increased step rate can be maintained at follow up and whether this changes movement patterns proposed to be the cause of injury. Runners will be recruited from local running clubs and competitions using poster advertisement at running clubs and emailed to running clubs

NCT ID: NCT02580630 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

Achilles Tendinopathy Treated With Training and Injections

Start date: April 2016
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to compare in a randomized double blinded controlled trial the effect of heavy slow resistance exercises combined with ultrasound guided injections with local anesthetic with or without glucocorticosteroid in patients with achilles tendinopathy.

NCT ID: NCT01691716 Completed - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

The Efficacy of Tendoactive, Eccentric Training, and the Combination of Both as a Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy

Tendoactive
Start date: April 2012
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine whether Tendoactive, eccentric training, or the combination or both could be effective in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy.

NCT ID: NCT01583504 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

High Volume Saline Injections for Achilles Tendinopathy

Start date: March 2012
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Hypothesis: High volume saline injections are an effective pain relieving treatment for people with longstanding pain in the achilles tendon which has not improved with a physiotherapy programme. Objective 1: To establish whether high volume saline injections are an effective treatment in decreasing pain for people with achilles tendinopathy Objective 2: To investigate whether high volume saline injections can improve day to day functioning, quality of life and the ultrasound appearances of the tendon for people with achilles tendinopathy Objective 3: To assess the tolerability of the procedure and levels of patient satisfaction using a simple questionnaire. Objective 4: To follow up the cohort of people who have received the injection for 9 months and ascertain whether any benefits persisted, or if the symptoms recurred. Background: Achilles tendon disorders are a common problem for athletes with a lifetime risk of around 50%. They are also common for less active people with a lifetime risk of around 6%. Tendinopathy is a condition which is characterised by pain, difficulty with weight bearing and swelling of the tendon. Symptoms may occur with exercise at first but can progress to occurring at rest and interfering with day to day activities. When the problematic tendon is examined under the microscope, it usually shows signs of degeneration rather than inflammation - especially when symptoms have been persistent. An ultrasound scan will usually show that the tendon is swollen with an increased water content and a disorganised tendon structure. A special type of ultrasound scan which looks at fluid flows, called a doppler ultrasound, often shows areas of increased blood flow around the tendon. Studies have shown that when these areas of increased blood flow are present, the patient tends to be experiencing more pain and stiffness in the tendon. Under the microscope, these blood vessels are often accompanied by nerve fibres and it has been suggested that these newly growing nerve endings are responsible for the persistent pain that patients experience. There is robust evidence that a particular type of exercise programme (eccentric loading) is an effective treatment for achilles tendinopathy. These exercises involve taking weight on the tendon whilst it is being compressed rather than stretched - heel lowering exercises. Nevertheless after completing a 3 month eccentric loading exercise programme, around 24-45% of patients will still have symptoms. There is no clear consensus amongst doctors as to what is the best second line treatment to try for this group of people. A number of different treatments have been described in research literature to try to treat this group of people with persistent symptoms, although no firm conclusion can be reached. There have been 2 small trials of high volume saline injections which showed some promising potential for the treatment. The aim of this injection is to destroy the blood vessels and nerve endings that grow into the swollen tendon to reduce pain and allow people to move and exercise more normally using the tendon. These studies simply looked at before and after injection results and did not compare the injections to a placebo or other treatment. The aim of this project is to conduct a high quality comparison of this new type of injection against a more common steroid and local anaesthetic injection around the tendon sheath. The design of the trial is a double blind, randomised controlled trial. This means that neither the patient, nor the doctor collecting data on pain scores knows which treatment the participant has been given, allowing a fair comparison of the interventions. The main comparisons between the 2 groups will take place at a 6 week follow up appointment. Once outcome measures have been recorded by the blinded assessor, the participant will then be told which arm of the study they are on. If they previously received the control injection (steroid and local anaesthetic only)and they still have symptoms, they will at this stage be offered the high volume saline injection as well. The investigators will then follow all of the study participants up for 9 months to ascertain whether people show a persistent benefit from the treatment, or whether symptoms subsequently return. The full study protocol is available on request from the Principle Investigator, along with information leaflets, ethical approvals etc.

NCT ID: NCT01341509 Recruiting - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

A Randomized Trial to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Transferring the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon

Start date: April 2011
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The optimal surgical treatment for insertional Achilles tendinopathy remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcome of surgical treatment by comparing the patient reported outcomes of Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy; Achilles tendon debridement, excision calcaneal exostosis, Strayer procedure, secondary repair of Achilles with flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer and Achilles tendon debridement, excision calcaneal exostosis, Strayer procedure, secondary repair of Achilles without FHL transfer.

NCT ID: NCT00952042 Completed - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

Resistance Training as Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy

Start date: July 2009
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

The use of eccentric resistance training as management of Achilles tendinopathy is widespread. The investigators have recently demonstrated that heavy slow resistance training was superior in the management of patellar tendinopathy. Hypothesis: heavy slow resistance training is more effective than eccentric resistance training in the clinical management of Achilles tendinopathy.

NCT ID: NCT00835939 Active, not recruiting - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

Treatment for Achilles Tendinopathy

Start date: September 2007
Phase: Phase 2/Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to determine whether sclerotherapy using a 25% dextrose and 1% lidocaine solution is an efficacious treatment for patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy who have failed a home based, heavy load eccentric training program.

NCT ID: NCT00792376 Completed - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

"NSAIDs in Acute Achilles Tendinopathy: Effect on Pain Control, Leg Stiffness and Functional Recovery in Athletes"

Start date: August 2009
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The purpose of this study is to evaluate etoricoxib efficacy in pain control, leg stiffness and functional recovery of patients suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy. It is hypothesized that etoricoxib (120mg orally/day/7 days) efficacy is not inferior to diclofenac (150mg orally /day/7 days) for pain control in subjects suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy.

NCT ID: NCT00761423 Completed - Clinical trials for Achilles Tendinopathy

The Value of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Chronic Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy: a Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

PRICT
Start date: August 2008
Phase: Phase 4
Study type: Interventional

The study will be a double-blind randomized single-center clinical trial comparing 3 treatment groups with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy.