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Abdomen, Acute clinical trials

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NCT ID: NCT03199495 Recruiting - Acupuncture Clinical Trials

Efficacy of Electroacupuncture on Acute Abdomen Emergency Care

Start date: April 17, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Contrast to conventional Western medicine, traditional Chinese medicine is the most common used therapy of complementary and alternative medicine. Taiwan inherits traditional Chinese culture, and the people popularly accept traditional Chinese medicine for general diseases. However, most patients with acute or critical illness are used to admit to emergency department for medical services, and then transfer to the department of related specialist for further treatment. During the course of staying at emergent observation room, some diseases do not meet the criteria of admission and keep for evaluation. The longer of staying at emergent observation room the more waste medical resources. The Chinese medicine department of Changhua Christian hospital has treated patients, who consulted us at their own dispense, with subjective discomfort but remained at the emergent observation room. Detailed contents of this study include the Chinese and Western medicine, pharmaceutical, nursing cooperation mode, monitoring clinical effect of treating of the patients diagnosed with intestinal obstruction or ileus who complain about nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, abdominal distension or constipation.And the patients were assigned to the control and treatment group. Then we give the treatment group with the electroacupuncture treatment,and the control groupe with the Chinese medicine seeds and the transcutaneous nerve stimulation (no power).The patients were diagnosed with objective analysis of tongue diagnosis, pulse diagnosis, heart rate variability, and questionnaire of pain. Hope that we can assess the efficacy of both two different treatment,and also assess the cost of medical care, and try to complete the syndromes statistical analysis of traditional Chinese medicine for abdominal pain, building the relevance of Chinese medicine physical assessment teaching and clinical efficacy. The most important of this clinical teaching is that, this is a good opportunity for Chinese medicine and Western medicine to cooperate with each other at the emergency department to confirm the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine, not only in the field of chronic or geriatric diseases, but also in the field of emergency with the evidence base. This factually achieves communication and integration of Chinese and Western medicine, and benefits the public.

NCT ID: NCT03198065 Recruiting - Acute Appendicitis Clinical Trials

Single-incision Laparoscopic Surgery in Acute Abdomen

Start date: June 17, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Interventional

Since Semm et.al. reported the first case of laparoscopic appendectomy in 1983, minimally invasive surgery has become the main stay for treating of many surgical diseases. After the booming in the advancement of surgical instrument and breakthrough in surgical skills, the minimally invasive surgery has been widely applied to neurosurgery, spinal surgery, breast, thyroid, hernia surgery, etc. It has been proved that minimally invasive surgery is safe and effective, and further it achieves compatible results and outcomes in oncology and functional diseases. Minimally invasive surgery in alimentary tract, known as laparoscopic surgery, has been performed in gastric surgery (e.g. gastric cancer, tumor, functional disorders and bariatric surgery), hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery (e.g. hepatectomy, cholecystectomy, and pancreatectomy), and colorectal surgery (e.g. colorectal cancer and functional bowel disease). Under a superior heritage of surgical skills from Taiwan university hospital, we introduced laparoscopic surgery in 1996 and currently, laparoscopic surgery becomes the mainstay of surgery in Yunlin branch. In 2015, there were 600 laparoscopic surgery in our hospital, while 150 colorectal laparoscopic surgery in the same year. In recent years, single-incisional laparoscopic surgery has emerged to become one of the focused topic in the world and seemly in our department. Through single-incision surgery, we attempted to minimize the incision wound to achieve better cosmesis and faster recovery. By the valuable clinical experiences gathering in our hospital (Yunlin branch) in recent 10 years, we contemplate two-step plans: first, by retrospective data collection, we can explain the clinical problems based on current statistical results. Second, based on prior (step 1) retrospective findings, a prospective study could be conducted for more evident results.

NCT ID: NCT03096665 Enrolling by invitation - Clinical trials for Cardiovascular Diseases

Effectiveness of Point of Care Blood Analysis Obtained From Skin Puncture Blood

Start date: April 1, 2017
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between the point of care blood analysis obtained from skin puncture blood and conventional blood analysis obtained from venous and arterial blood.

NCT ID: NCT03074084 Recruiting - Abdominal Pain Clinical Trials

Acute Abdomen in Adults- a Prospective Study on Emergency Department Admissions

Start date: June 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

This is a non-randomized, prospective, population-based, single-center study designed to evaluate conditions resulting emergency admission in patients with abdominal pain. Furthermore, we are interested in how many patients are discharged with "non-specific abdominal pain" but later readmitted and diagnosed with a specific diagnosis.

NCT ID: NCT03015233 Recruiting - Renal Colic Clinical Trials

Acute Abdominal Pain: Evaluation of Lactate Value as Predictive Factor of Surgical Issue

GALAC
Start date: June 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for consultation in Emergency Departments (ED) worldwide. The challenge for physicians is to not misdiagnose a surgical emergency. The actual gold standard for diagnosis is computed tomography (CT). However with this procedure there is high radiation exposure and a risk factor of radiation-induced cancers, therefore alternative diagnostic techniques should be considered. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of measuring venous lactate in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in ED. In this single-center, prospective, non-interventional study, the diagnostic accuracy of venous lactate in order to detect surgical emergencies is evaluated. The hypothesis made here is that venous lactatemia is a positive predictive factor of surgical emergencies in patients with acute abdominal pain.

NCT ID: NCT02980081 Completed - Emergencies Clinical Trials

Abdominal Plain X-ray in the Emergency Departement

Start date: November 2016
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

There are only few recognized indications for the realization of plain abdominal X-rays in the emergency departement. The objective of this study is to explore the reasons for abdominal plain X-rays prescription in the Emergency departments (EDs) of two hospitals.

NCT ID: NCT02582307 Recruiting - Children Clinical Trials

Buscopan Versus Acetaminophen for Acute Abdominal Pain in Children

Start date: March 20, 2017
Phase: Phase 3
Study type: Interventional

There is ample evidence that pain in children is under recognized and under treated. This is especially true for acute abdominal pain, a common complaint in the paediatric emergency department. Clinicians often fear that analgesia will obscure the diagnosis of a potentially surgical condition. As a result, acute abdominal pain goes untreated in many children, as there is no standard of care. Hyoscine N-butylbromide (Buscopan) has been used successfully in adults and children for pain associated with urinary tract infections and kidney stones for over 60 years. However, no study has explored its usefulness in relieving acute abdominal pain in children. The objectives of this study are to investigate to what degree Buscopan is effective in relieving abdominal pain in children compared to acetaminophen.

NCT ID: NCT02467959 Recruiting - Acute Appendicitis Clinical Trials

Diagnostic Accuracy of Emergency Physician Performed Bedside Ultrasound in Suspected Acute Appendicitis

Start date: January 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

The aim of the study is to evaluate the diagnostic yield and accuracy of bedside emergency physician performed ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

NCT ID: NCT02399150 Completed - Clinical trials for Acute Abdominal Pain

Biomarkers in Acute Abdomen

BIOMAB
Start date: May 2015
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Background: In the emergency setting, acute abdominal pain is a diagnostic challenge, as pain is a subjective measure, and serious causes needing surgical intervention do not always meet the clinical picture. Biomarkers measuring the individual stress or pain level may aid in identifying surgical emergencies, but there are many influencing factors that have to be taken into account. Objective: To evaluate defined stress biomarkers for their diagnostic and prognostic utility in measuring pain, and to evaluate potential influencing or confounding factors. Design: Prospective observational study in 200 patients presenting to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Estimated duration: May 2015 - May 2016 Location Setting: Emergency Department (ED) of the Hôpital Universitaire Pitié-Salpétrière, Paris, France. Study population: 200 patients presenting to the ED with acute abdomen Eligibility criteria: - Inclusion criteria: Presentation at ED with acute abdominal pain, aged at least 18 years - Exclusion criteria: no informed consent, pregnancy, homeless, no social assurance Procedure: Patients presenting to the ED with acute abdominal pain will be included after informed consent is given. Blood and saliva samples will be drawn initially and after 4 hours, and baseline data assessed. All diagnostic procedures results and diagnosis made by the treating physicians as well as initiated treatment will be recorded Final diagnosis and outcome will be assessed by 2-week-telephone interview. Measurement of candidate biomarkers will be performed in collected material. Copeptin and SAA will be measured as potential biomarkers, as a control value, cortisol will be obtained. Other biomarkers will be in consideration, depending upon availability and financial aspects. Safety evaluations: All recommendations outlined in the ICH Guidelines for Good Clinical Practice will be adhered to throughout this trial. Sample size considerations: The number of patients of this pilote study is based on the estimate of 25 % or 50 of acute abdomen patients to have a surgical emergency. Significance of the study: If a biomarker is found that safely discriminates between surgical urgency and harmless abdominal pain, this will spare radiologic exposure in often young patients and will aid in optimized allocation of health care resources.

NCT ID: NCT02047812 Completed - Abdomen, Acute Clinical Trials

The Hospital Volume Relationship in Emergency Laparotomy Outcomes

Start date: January 2001
Phase: N/A
Study type: Observational

Introduction 'Emergency Laparotomy' is an umbrella term for a set of commonly performed procedures which are known to carry a significant risk of mortality and morbidity. Previous work has shown considerable inter-hospital variation in emergency laparotomy outcomes within the United Kingdom. It is unknown whether there are significant differences in outcomes following laparotomy which may be explained by differences in hospital procedural volume. Aims The aim of this study is to compare emergency laparotomy outcomes in Scotland as they vary by hospital procedural volume. Methods This research study is a retrospective observational enquiry which will utilise administrative data from the Information Services Division (ISD) of NHS National Services Scotland. Patient episodes will be identified by a set of procedure codes for emergency laparotomy. The primary outcome measure will be risk-adjusted 30 day/inpatient mortality, and secondary outcome measures will be 30 day readmission rate, 30 day re-operation rate and length of stay.